Hitch1

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Cosmic Consciousness: new ebook by near-death experiencer

When Diane Goble began developing her first website in 1996 to talk about her near-death experience by drowning during a white water rafting accident in 1971, she had no idea she would eventually connect with millions of people all over the world with her message from the other side that “We Don’t Die!”

She received emails from thousands of people from 140 different countries, from all religions and the skeptics, all wanting to ask her about her experience, what she learned, her higher perspective on life and God; seekers hoping for answers to questions they’ve never dared ask before; wanting confirmation that there is more to life beyond this life and that we get to see our loved ones again. But even more, these people wanted to share their pain and spiritual angst with someone who understood and wouldn’t judge them. They poured out their hearts and many found their souls.

Now Available on Kindle through Pre-Release at Amazon.com

AmazonCover Release date March 1, 2016 – Order your copy now

For the next 10 years, Diane’s spiritual path became responding to all those emails while meditating and allowing the message to come through her. She expanded her website to include lessons and resources for spiritual seekers, as well as for healers and caregivers. On her online Seekers Open Forum page, she posted many of the emails she received and her responses, and invited others to share in the discussions. There weren’t as many trolls back then but she wasn’t afraid to take them on and had quite a few provocative exchanges.

As it turned out, a lot of people asked similar questions about the same subjects so rather than continue to personally respond to everyone and repeat her answers, she grouped similar questions and put a sampling from various subjects into a book to provide a variety of perspectives about similar topics, such as Near-Death Experiences, Fear of Death, Grief, The Afterlife, Paranormal, Reincarnation, Suicide, and Spiritual but not Religious.

It is her hope that making this information more available at this time will encourage further conversations that will lead to more people on the planet waking up… becoming aware that there is more to “life” than we’ve been led to believe… that we have become mental prisoners of lies forced upon us by those who need to keep us dumb slaves so they can become more wealthy and powerful… that we are brainwashed into becoming warriors willing to die for the military industrial complex as if it were an honorable thing to do. If we realized who we really are, they couldn’t control us.

“If we’re going to save the planet and Humanity,” she says, “those who are awake, need to awaken others to Cosmic Consciousness— We Are One. Open your heart. Expand your Consciousness. Imagine Peace. Do everything with Love.”

Comments from emailers–

Thank you SO much for your kind and thoughtful response. You are a nurturing soul… I am very eager to get a handle on this… I often feel that I am not from around here … or don’t want to be here … not like wanting to be dead, just not wanting to be on earth.        –Molly

What a relief to communicate with someone who understands how I feel. I have just been in the garden contemplating things. You have hit the nail on the head in so many ways.   –Lenny

Thank you Diane for your courage to speak out. I never wanted to say much about it [childhood NDE] because I felt people would think I was crazy. Now I’m grown and live a good life and I treat people like I want to be treated. — Bobbie

I very much enjoy your words and outlook, I think you really are here to calm humanities fear of death. What an awesome life mission to have. –Pete

You have no idea how glad I was receiving your email! Just the thought that you actually took the time to answer me shows what a caring and lovely person you are. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. I continue reading your site and I printed all its contents, which filled a thick binder. It is for me like a Bible and whenever I feel down or scared I consult it giving me comfort. –Maria

I was moved to tears. Some how I wanted to cry with joy for what I was reading. I was so deeply touched by your insights some how you’ve articulated so many things I’ve felt.     –Sonny

I needed focusing into what I was already aware of and you helped. Thank you soooo much!! –Carly

…your site certainly came into my view at the exact time period in which I could not have needed it more. Thank you for your courage in sharing your story, and for the manner in which you decided to share it. –Patricia

Your Q&A approach covers every question that I had before I had thought of them yet. “Nothing on Earth Had Prepared Me For the Reality of Life After Death” (Chapter One) was the most profound, insightful piece of writing I have yet found in all of the NDE books I have read. I know how impossible it is to put NDE subjects in relatable or fresh terms, but I think you succeeded. –RJ

Thank you so much for your reply. It is the BEST explanation I have had. — Laurie

… thank you for responding to my message and, of course, for telling me, a complete stranger, about the life-altering experience you had. –Paul

… please accept A Heartfelt Thank you for your inspirational site! It is encouraging to connect with one who is walking their talk as a living example of truth/god in action! expressing it-self in physical form! –Donna

… you have a wonderful website and your words are most comforting for those of us that fear disease and death. —Bob

Thank you for this site. This site will always benefit people. —Dave

I will also remain very thankful that our paths crossed. You were right when you wrote on your website about the fact that there are no accidents. I was led to the site for a reason, and thanks to your kindness and patience I understand that reason much better today that I thought possible. Thank you again… you are a very kind soul indeed… —Kaleb

I just wanted to say thank you so much for sharing all your experiences and knowledge with the world. You see, you were partly responsible for saving my life. — Shawn

You have articulated my own thoughts much better than I have been able to myself… –Greta

I just found your web site since I just woke up this morning and am gratified to find it. I have been crying a cry of recognition reading the feelings and experiences of your other Emailers. –Mike

I’ve been a confused Christian for 31 years and within a week of reading from your website I feel a newfound joy in wanting to understand the soul’s purpose, journey, etc. in a positive way. –Adam

I appreciate your willingness to respond to people about your experience and what you have learned. Your response put into words a gut feeling I have had for a long time. Thank you! –Scott

When I read your email, it was like a light bulb went off in my head. It’s like I always knew that but was afraid to think it because it’s not what I was brought up to believe. I’m so grateful to you for opening my eyes. –Marianne

Read about my Near-Death Experience Here

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 1/13/16)

by Diane Goble

What does “retirement” mean? It suggests calling it quits, packing it in, withdrawing, falling back. Nothing in there about a new beginning, the realization that there’s more to life than working, that’s there’s a whole world of unexplored territory out there to investigate. Hopefully retirement is the time to do all the things you couldn’t do before because life got in the way.

Social scientists have determined that the most damaging threat to well being later in life is boredom and a loss of life purpose; only rarely is it fear of absolute destitution or poor health. Here’s what a search of the web shows about what retirees are doing to maintain their physical health and mental well-being, and that there are some differences among younger retirees (ages 65 to 74) and senior retirees (ages 75+). It’s certainly true for me as I approach that 75 mark that I’ve slowed down significantly.

Apparently the younger group spends a lot of time in front of the TV for their first ten years, probably just trying to recover from working their butts off for the previous 40 years. They average 4 hours a day watching TV compared to 2.6 for the overall population.

All seniors spend a lot more time reading books than they did before retiring, averaging an hour a day, which is three times as much as younger ages. They go to the library more often, listen to more books on tape, and have adapted quickly to electronic media and reading ebooks.

Senior retirees spend 42 minutes a day thinking and relaxing; younger retirees, a mere 20 minutes. It seems we become more contemplative and reflective as we let go of the little details of life and finally dare to explore higher consciousness. They also tend to consider their life review more conscientiously as they are faced with their own mortality.

Most people over 65 tend to spend more time eating and preparing meals; over an hour and twenty minutes a day. They eat out more often. Many learn to cook new dishes; some learn to cook for the first time. Their health concerns lead them to learn more about their bodies and how to take better care of them so they are healthier and can continue to be active.

Most retirees of all ages send more time shopping than younger folks. They now have the time for comparison shopping, searching for the best deal. They enjoy lingering in stores, chatting with salespeople and people-watching. They are in no hurry; they have no pressing meetings to get to. They may not need anything in particular, but they may come across that thing they can’t live without and are content with browsing.

Time spent volunteering nearly doubles when people reach age 65. Sometimes when we retire we find our true purpose in life because it isn’t about earning a living or saving for retirement any more. All that is in the past and we get to follow our heart or our intuition, express our creativity, pay it forward or give back if we’ve been given a lot— be the change we want to see in the world.

Retirees spend twice as much time as younger people returning phone calls, emails or writing letters that aren’t work related, and more time at social activities. Their calendars are full of birthdays and book clubs and quilting bees or chewing the fat with the boys at Sisters Coffee.

Some younger seniors still tend to spend an hour or two a day “working” but most stop before 75. Those unable to stop often become consultants or chairman of some board or motivational speakers. There are a few diehards who will never give it up preferring to die with their boots on.

Retirees 75+ spend 10 hours per day sleeping or engaged in other personal care activities such as bathing or dressing, which is actually not as much as teens and early 20-somethings who spend less of that same time sleeping and more time primping and changing their minds.

And finally, all seniors spend more time doing exercises for health reasons. Walking is the most common activity but many take up hiking or bicycling or skydiving, join health clubs, fitness centers and do yoga. Meditation is also becoming more popular as we finally begin to realize the stress we’ve been under for decades has taken its toll and we really need to learn to relax, let go of the tension, and just be.

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

Look for New Release from Diane Goble in January 2016

Hitchhiker’s Guide to Cosmic Consciousness


It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

Diane-BtV4x4

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 12/2/15)

by Diane Goble

I haven’t had a TV for years and rarely do I get to watch one for more than a few minutes just in passing so imagine my shock when I was pet/house sitting recently, and decided to turn on the TV and flip through the channels.

It’s all advertising… like a continuous barrage of commercials with a few minutes of jokes or news stories in between! The majority of commercials seem to be for pharmaceuticals to combat all the symptoms and diseases all the people who watch TV apparently have (else why would people continue to watch these repetitive infomercials day in and day out?). It’s like there’s some kind of sick symbiotic relationship that feeds on itself. The more you watch, the sicker you get.

The symptoms these commercials describe are so vague or general that anyone might think they have some disease and must need that medication. Unconsciously, we make doctor’s appointments and insist we must have this amazing new wonder drug. I guess doctors who take kickbacks from Big Pharma could be making a killing writing prescriptions for patients with chronic complaints. Hmmm… drug overdoses caused more deaths than motor vehicle crashes in 2013.

I heard an advertisement for a medication claiming to cure some illness, but in the meantime I may have headaches, nausea, vomiting, seizures, paralysis, rectal bleeding, suicidal feelings or sudden death. Really? Are you insane? And with all the personal products that are being advertised, how does one watch television with their darling grandchild these days when you have to explain why a 4-hour erection is painful for Grandpa?

I was pleased to see commercials with male underwear models strutting their stuff. You’ve come a long way, baby! But the clothing being advertised… really? This whole skinny jeans with 6″ heels is just weird, but then, to me, clean jeans is dressed up. $300 purses with some French guy’s name on it… please. It’s like Barbie and Ken have come to life and are living in McMansions, driving Porsches, and need to change clothes every two hours.

Then I came upon FOX News and it about scared the crap out of me! Where do they find these characters? It’s like a reality show gone haywire. Is it brain damage or a deliberate attempt to incite riots among the populace? I mean just because I don’t have a TV doesn’t mean I don’t keep up with what’s going on around the world, but if I watched that nonsense every day, I’d be digging a well-fortified, heavily-armed underground bunker preparing for any of a dozen different end of the world scenarios.

So another thing about being a certain age… those of us who grew up realizing that duck and cover under our school desks wasn’t going to save us from a nuclear bomb know that fear is a way to control people and TV is being used to do just that. People need to wake up and smell the coffee. This is not real life!

The air raid siren has been replaced by FOX News and it’s just a cover for the struggle for power and control (over our lives) among Big Government, Big Business, the Illuminati, or whatever they call themselves. We’re like mushrooms. They keep us in the dark and feed us manure. They control our minds and we don’t even see it.

Hopefully one day, before we become too senile, we wake up and realize we want off the treadmill. One way to do that is to turn off the TV and get back to real life, including family, friends and community. Go outside and take a walk. Look at that beautiful blue sky. Breathe in that positive, uplifting energy. Thank the flowers. Talk to the trees. Dance like no one is watching. Sing with the birds. Read a book. Shed the old worn skin and stretch your imagination out into the universe. Become one with the source of your being and know that you are loved.

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

Look for New Release from Diane Goble in January 2016

Hitchhiker’s Guide to Cosmic Consciousness


 

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

Diane-BtV4x4

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 11/4/15)

by Diane Goble

A nightmare for any writer is to not be able to find the right word you’re looking for and I seem to be experiencing that more often lately. I don’t even have to be writing to forget my words. I’m in Bi-Mart last week on a mission to find a 9″ disposable deep dish pie pan in which to bake a zucchini pie. First of all, they’ve changed the store all around much to the consternation of us seniors so the first thing is to locate the new house wares section.

A cursory look down several aisles doesn’t reveal anything resembling pie plates. A sales associate stocking shelves asks if she can help me find something and my mind goes blank. I can visualize exactly what I want, I just can’t remember what it’s called. I make vague hand gestures as if it has become a game of charades.

“If you can tell me what you want do with it,” she laughed, “I can usually figure it out.” She’s obviously encountered seniors on the floor before. I managed to convey the pie pan part but next couldn’t remember what it was made out of that made it disposable. “Aluminum foil!” she exclaimed. “Yes!” I sighed. Apparently I need a translator with me just to accomplish a simple shopping trip— or is there an app for that?

A couple of weeks ago I was shopping at Food4Less. Stopping at the end of an aisle, I went to look at my shopping list and realized I no longer had my purse. Just as I turned around to retrace my steps, I saw a clerk walking towards me carrying my purse on her way to the manager’s office. She had found it in the produce section where I apparently set it down to bag some veggies and walked off without it. I’m going to have to go back to a purse with a shoulder strap so that doesn’t happen again. I tell ya, when you get to be a certain age…

A friend of mine and I had this totally serendipitous moment the other day. I was walking home past Clemens Park and noticed a large black poodle-mix dog sniffing around in the grass, but not a person in sight, and I didn’t recognize the dog as being from the neighborhood. I called the dog several times but it wouldn’t come to me so I sat down on the curb and talked to him until he finally came over, and then was very friendly. He had the required tags, but no nametag.

Luckily I had my reading glasses with me and was able to make out a phone number that had been scratched onto the back of his vaccination tag. I called the number and a woman answered with “Hello Diane,” which at the time I didn’t question, and I asked her if she was missing her dog. She said no, that she was shopping in Bi-Mart and her dog was in her car, so I described the dog standing next to me to her. She was half hysterical! How could this even be?

She asked me if I knew whom I was talking to and I said no. Turned out she’s a friend and my name came up on her caller ID, which is how she knew it was me calling, but it was so out of context, we were both completely baffled. We had this weird moment of cognitive dissonance where neither of us could figure out what the heck just happened.

Needless to say, she rushed over to the park having realized she had driven down the street that parallels Clemens Park and stopped at a house for sale to pick up a flyer. She apparently left the car door open, and the dog slipped out without her noticing. She got back in the car and drove to Bi-Mart, never realizing her dog wasn’t in the back of the car.

I’m sure we all have moments when we really wonder if we are losing our minds, maybe even get mad at our selves for not being able to do things or remember things as well as we used to. I was commiserating on the phone with my ex-husband the other night and I said, “I remember when I used to be able to keep 25 or 30 balls in the air at the same time, now I’m lucky to be able to hold onto one.”

I prefer to look at it positively and believe my mature mind resonates at higher frequencies and explores higher dimensions of consciousness… and if the details of every day life inadvertently slip by me, so be it.

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

Diane-BtV4x4

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 10/7/15)

by Diane Goble

“But now the days are short, I’m in the autumn of my years and I think of my life as vintage wine…” I can remember mooning over old blue eyes as he crooned that tune many decades ago (Frank Sinatra, for those too young to remember), but now that I am actually in the autumn of my years, I feel more like an old bottle of muscatel.

I sit here and watch the leaves outside my window gradually turning deeper shades of red and remember all the trails I used to hike through some of the most spectacularly beautiful landscapes from California to Oregon… and all the photographs I took along the way. I especially loved fall for the spectacular display of colors.

For several years before I moved to Sisters, I used to drive up here, just me and my dog, a few times a year from Mammoth Lakes, California to visit my daughter and her family— an 11 to 12-hour drive depending on the number of photo ops I veered off Hwy. 395 to check out a captivating view. I always looked forward to my fall trips either north or south to experience the range of colors. I’d seek out hidden lakes just to catch the reflections and wild rivers to contemplate the variety of colors among the groves of deciduous trees interspersed among the evergreens.

To just sit alone and be present with the quiet beauty of nature, surrounded by a kaleidoscope of colors sparkling in the sunlight, reflected in a mirror pond, brings me to a sense of peace and profound connection with the universe. My beautiful Aussie-Lab, Spirit, was my perfect companion and never failed to amuse me with her antics. She would run into any body of water with reckless abandon, including snow covered icy rivers and lakes then just sit there in the middle of it and look around like she was at the spa. Really! I have the pictures!

Ah, but I said “used to” hike because I don’t hike anymore. Spirit is gone and I can no longer trust my body to make the trip without something going awry. The last few hikes I went on a couple of years ago, my knees ached and my feet felt like they were on fire… I thought they were going to have to carry me out.

I live in town so I do walk as much as I can and I have a friend who motivates me to get out several mornings a week. I can still see the Sisters from a distance but I can only take so may photos from town. One thing on my Bucket List is to go through the tens of thousands of photos I’ve taken and pick out the ones worth saving. When I was doing all that driving and photography, I kept a journal and even did some tape recordings while on the road. I’ve thought about getting back into that material and maybe turning it into a book. It’s also on my List.

Then a few months ago, I was suddenly, for no apparent reason, in so much pain I couldn’t stand upright. I had to stop everything I was doing and just deal with the pain factor. I started to think about what would happen if I could never stand up and walk around on my own again. I started looking online for home health care devices like safety grab bars and raised toilet seats. I got out the home health services brochures I’ve collected from various agencies to figure out what help I could afford.

I started thinking about assisted living. OMG, no! I’m so not ready for assisted living. I’ve been to Helen’s Home several times to interview the Tolles for articles and their adult foster care home concept is great. Anna’s Home is very pleasant and the residents seem quite happy. I have been in many facilities as a hospice volunteer and as nice as some of them are and as great as the people are who work there, I’m far too independent to live within their necessary restrictions. Never was very good at following the rules. I’d have to be in a coma.

Well, my hip is much better, 90% better, since I had the epidural steroid injection a month ago, but I still feel the burn often enough to question whether I dodged the bullet or there’s more to come. Doctor said some people need several shots before they get it under control.

So I can’t end Frank’s song with “It’s been a very good year,” but it has made me look into other options if I needed extra help at home or could no longer drive or manage on my own so it won’t be such an ordeal if it does come up. Bummer, but when you get to be a certain age, these things do come up and we do have to deal with them.

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

 

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

Diane-BtV4x4

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 8/22/15)

by Diane Goble

After attending all the Community Assets Committee meetings this past year because I was interested in observing the process, I can say I was pleasantly surprised at how well-organized it was— everybody participated cooperatively, there was no dissension, no politics, no ego trips, and they accomplished their goal of vetting the top three projects voted on by the people who attended a previous town hall meeting.

Next they offered a follow-up town hall meeting to explain the results and present a survey to get more public input about how to proceed. Only about 10% of those eligible to vote turned in a survey despite intense outreach. Did the other 90% just not want anything to do with it? Did twelve people basically waste their time for a year doing what people asked them to do?

City Council did vote to form a follow-up committee last month, but so far haven’t. With only a 10% response, they might not consider it a priority. Maybe it’s apathy, not toxicity, that’s the problem with Sisters.

A lot of changes have taken place in Sisters since the Vision Statement was written in 2010. Sisters is having an identity crisis and doesn’t know who she is. She’s not just a cozy little western artsy tourist town any more and is poised to come into her own as a full-fledged self-supporting… what? What does Sisters want to be when she grows up?

Vision statement: “We create our future through a strong planning process that protects town character, encourages environmental sustainability, and defines future development including housing options for all citizens.”

That didn’t happen. When this was written, nobody anticipated a recession with loss of jobs, business closings, lower property values; loss of homes, farms, livestock, savings; and many families leaving the area and emptying the schools. A lot of old timers left and new families moved in bringing with them different values and ideas. So the old timers left are ticked off at the new comers, and the new comers don’t really care what the old timers think and see Sisters as a blank slate they can write on.

City management seems intent on grooming Sisters as a mecca for tourists from overcrowded cities along the coast who have certain expectations about amenities and apparently like to drink. Bud growers aren’t welcome in spite of the plant’s medicinal and economic potential.

High tech entrepreneurs hope to make Sisters a hub for small international online businesses. Developers want to make it a destination resort or a health and wellness canter. The arts community, which besides the environment is the biggest draw to Sisters, struggles to find support amidst the changing business models. The City keeps imposing more taxes and fees on businesses and landlords keep raising their rents forcing many small business owners to close. Are they anticipating major boutique chains coming to sell knockoffs made in China?

Those who wrote the vision statement didn’t anticipate there might be working families who couldn’t afford housing. Developers whine there’s not enough profit in it for them to build affordable housing, much less apartments for working families, who would become future homeowners with school students.

There’s the divide between the rich and the poor, the haves and the have-nots; the property owners and the renters; those inside the city limits, those outside. We have those who can afford to own homes outside Sisters and shop in Sisters and those who have to commute to do the jobs required to maintain a tourist economy and service the wealthy homeowners.

Vision statement: “We have a strong tourism economy because of this beauty. But we are also a diversified entrepreneurial economy that includes arts and culture, light industry, natural resource-based businesses, and small retail. This economy especially supports locally conceived and owned businesses that provide a wide variety of year-round family wage jobs.”

Once again, didn’t happen. There are people at the city working on making changes and looking to the public for input so this is your chance to get involved in the new economic development of Sisters.

We’re in a period of everybody having cognitive dissonance. Nobody knows the answer or which direction to go. This is new territory. I’m just putting this out there to generate discussions and encourage people to take their ideas to city council. They say they want solutions, not problems. Bring it!

Vision statement: “Highly developed local leadership and an active and informed citizenry make Sisters a fine example of community self-sufficiency and grassroots democracy.”

That hasn’t happened either. I’d say both sides need improvement— more education about their jobs for city manager, council, committee members and staff; and more citizen education and involvement. It takes a community with a common vision working together to bring about change.

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

Diane-BtV4x4

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 9/2/15)

by Diane Goble

In the U.S., 160,000 children miss school every day out of fear of being bullied and almost half of all students say they have experienced bullying. I can remember being physically sick many mornings before going to elementary school for fear of being bullied. It stayed with me through high school. It affected me in my work life. I still experience anticipatory anxiety in certain situations, but, at least, now, I recognize it… do some deep breathing and put it into perspective.

I had the opportunity to speak to a class at Sisters High School last year and as I wandered down the hallways I was suddenly transported back to my own school experiences 50 plus years ago. All the times I was bullied by classmates and friends flashed through my mind. My worst memories, by far, come from my high school swim coach, who chastised, berated, humiliated, demeaned and threatened his athletes in every way possible to get us to perform, then punished us (100 laps) if we didn’t beat our best time every meet. Winning was all he cared about. It was all about him and his reputation, not us. It still raises my hackles every time I hear about a youth sports coach overstepping the line.

Speaking of coaches, I recently came across an article that listed the highest paid corporate CEOs in the U.S. and they are all ex-college football coaches. Their bullying attitude trickles down the corporate culture. It comes out in the sales and marketing tactics, and the way employees are treated in the workplace. It’s all about getting the sale, the contract, the money, the deal… everything is monetized, not personalized.

These life-long bullies carry their kindergarten mentality through high school to college to career, into their marriages, and get themselves into positions of power where they think they have the right to mess with people’s lives as if others are somehow less human, less deserving, less worthwhile as human beings. They think what they think is more right than what others think and they assume, if nobody stands up to them, that they get to make the rules for everybody else using bullying tactics, if necessary. Little dictators are everywhere.

Inside they may be miserable, sad, unhappy people with early childhood tragedies unconsciously motivating them to seek revenge by doing unto others what was done to them, for which they should be seeking counseling, not revenge. Adult bullies were either bullies as children or were bullied as children. Unfortunately they don’t see themselves as being the common denominator in all the dramas they create as they shift their internalized anger onto others. They get that bewildered “who me?” look on their face when confronted.

There are the self-centered, narcissistic bullies who have no empathy with others and little anxiety about the consequences. In order to feel good about themselves, they have to put other people down. They are not interested in working things out; they are not interested in compromise. They are more interested in power and domination; they need to feel important and preferred.

I used to work for such a man, a wealthy philanthropist who schmoozed with the rich and famous of Hollywood, who gloated over reducing women to tears using as few words as possible. It didn’t work on me (I told him to go f*#k himself early on and he respected that), but his ex-wives, whom I had to comfort over the phone on an almost daily basis, kept coming back for more.

Verbal bullies can be quite damaging and difficult to document. These bullies may start rumors about their victims, talk about them behind their back, stop talking or whisper when they approach. They may use sarcastic or demeaning language to dominate or humiliate someone. Words don’t leave visible scars but the emotional and psychological impacts go deep and can result in reduced job performance and even depression.

Another kind of bully doesn’t initiate the bullying but joins in with the bullying against someone else often to protect themselves from becoming the next victim. This secondary bully may even feel bad she or he is doing it, but is more concerned with self-protection. In the workplace, this can disrupt productivity, create a hostile work environment and reduce morale.

It’s been my experience that many “bosses” rule by intimidation, insinuation, double-speak, sabotage, plying one side against the other, which just drives employees to the brink. It’s a return to the playground mentality when the bully picks on some kid and everybody else gangs up on that kid, except now the bully is on a school board or a city council or is a coach or a CEO or a lawyer.

They get away with it because they don’t leave any marks with their passive-aggressive behavior and, if called out, would adamantly deny what observers can see so clearly. It’s often an unconscious reaction on their part, but the wounds they inflict on others are deep nevertheless. And it’s not just the person and her or his family who are affected by bullying; there is a ripple effect into the community that can take on a life of its own.

It starts at home. Parents who bully their children teach them to get what they want by bullying others, thus perpetuating the pattern. As TVs shrink Dr. Bob Newhart used to advise, “Stop it!” If you’re of a certain age and still struggling with the scars of childhood bullying, get some counseling, take up meditation or yoga to release the negative energy. Search YouTube and find videos that describe this behavior and how to defuse bullies. Sometimes they just need a hug or to know their grievances have been heard.

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

Diane-BtV4x4

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 7/22/15)

by Diane Goble

Sometimes my body just has to quit working to get me to slow down long enough to readjust my compass. A severe bout with sciatica this past month left me barely able to do much of anything but the bare necessities, giving me plenty of rest and time to rethink my priorities.

I am a retired person. Why the heck am I still “working” 8 to 10 hours a day 7 days a week, mostly not for pay? I really can’t afford to give away the time I need to accomplish the few projects I have left on my Bucket List before I am no longer capable of completing them— and I’ll be really ticked off if I die before I do. As I’m writing this, today is the 44th anniversary of the first time I died suddenly so I’m more aware than most how quickly that can happen.

I’ve decided to let go of the things I don’t find fulfilling or that don’t contribute to my well-being and peace of mind or pay my bills. While it’s been a trip exploring the goings on at city hall, I really don’t need that stress or those conflicts in my life. A good stress management technique is to stop doing what causes distress.

The sciatica attack stopped me from attending city meetings because the pain in my hip joint was so excruciating that I couldn’t stand upright, much less walk, after sitting for any amount of time. Just getting around at home was a painful enough struggle. MMJ edibles helped me deal with the pain of just getting through the day and helped me sleep at night. I did have to resort to a week on steroids to get the inflammation down and the wonderful therapists at GreenRidge Physical Therapy have gotten me upright and mobile again. Not quite pain-free yet.

Over the weeks of not attending city meetings, I realized I didn’t miss them and now that we can listen to meeting recordings on the city’s website, if I really feel a need to know who said what about which issue and the other folderol that goes on there, I can do it at my convenience. I’m tired of trying to make the world a better place. You’re on your own.

But now, to keep this sciatica at bay, I can’t sit at my computer for any length of time any more. As a writer and a photographer that’s about all I do, pretty much every day. Just as well… I’ve read headlines lately saying all this sitting at computers is shaving years off our lives. I’m like a canary in the coal mine. I find myself warning my grandsons about their constant gaming. The brain, as well as the butt, needs more frequent breaks— or they breakdown.

Part of getting older is learning to adapt to the changes our bodies and brains go through and how it changes our lifestyle. I thought I was going to have to install a rail in the bathtub because it was tricky getting in and out not being able to put any weight on my right leg. I never knew when it would give out. Sometimes it was fine, other times it would pinch and send a shooting pain down my leg to my foot sending me to my knees. I got a walker from the Habitat ReStore to help me get around inside but it was too difficult to maneuver on the carpet. A cane wasn’t enough support. Finally a friend loaned me her ski poles and they really helped.

While pondering what it means to grow older, I got back to thinking about where I was on my Bucket List. I’ve already been everywhere I care to go and have pretty much seen everything I really wanted to see and done everything I wanted to do. No regrets. Well, except for going to the moon. My father was an entrepreneur in the early days of commercial aviation. I was in high school when space exploration began. I was hoping I would get there in this lifetime, but it looks like I’ll have to wait for my next incarnation.

In this life I’ve been very, very rich and I’ve been homeless and destitute, and everything in between. I’ve moved all over the country, had over 40 different addresses before coming to Sisters, and driven through all but 6 states. I’ve had friends from all over the world of all colors, all genders, all religions, all political parties, many nationalities, all walks of life, both sane and insane. I was married once and realized that wasn’t for me. Like Shirley MacLaine, I had an awful lot of lovers and a lot of awful lovers, and now I’d rather have a funny, loyal dog than a human for a roommate.

So I really haven’t missed much, have done my gratitude and forgiveness work, my end of life paperwork is complete, and I’m at peace with my life so I’m going back into hibernation to concentrate on downloading my memories about my very interesting life journey, which my kids don’t even know the half of— not to publish but to leave to my children as a computer file they, and future generations, can add to and keep the narrative going.

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

Diane-BtV4x4

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 6/17/15)

by Diane Goble

For many years, I’ve helped people deal with advance healthcare planning both as an author and an educator. I currently write a blog and articles encouraging people to have the conversation with their family about their wishes for end of life treatment long before it becomes necessary.

As a hospice volunteer for many years, I witnessed too many feuds among family members who hadn’t openly expressed their values and talked about what treatments they’d want or not want in an emergency scenario. “Do everything” may be one’s first reaction, but it isn’t always the best option and hope isn’t a plan.

I have all my paperwork in order and have discussed my wishes for care and treatment with my healthcare representative in case something happens suddenly rendering me unable to comprehend the situation or communicate my wishes. I have a pre-paid cremation plan in place along with suggestions to my kids for getting together to scatter my ashes off a designated mountaintop while listening to a playlist of my favorite music.

All my financial records and personal information, account numbers, passwords, locations of items, my advance healthcare directive, Last Will & Testament, Powers of Attorney, tax records, titles and so on are listed and in a single location with instructions about who to contact and what to do with what I left behind.

I did all this not because I’m a control freak, but because I don’t want to leave a mess behind for my kids to have to figure out if I should suddenly become incapacitated or die. My father dropped dead of a heart attack. I had no idea where anything was. It took me five years of legal wrangling, dealing with unscrupulous lawyers, the IRS, his creditors, his 4th ex-wife… don’t even get me started about her!

My mother, on the other hand, was much more organized, which made it a lot easier on my sister and I when it came to managing her care and following her end of life wishes. It also helped me decide to be pro-active about my own final wishes.

And then, thinking I was all set, I read an article recently about how seniors don’t plan for, not just long-term care but, how to adapt to the aging process as we begin to lose our abilities and I realized I forgot about that part. I started to wonder should I give up riding my bike because, at this certain age… if I fall and shatter a few bones, there’s a good chance it could be a long time before I return to self-sufficiency. If I have a stroke and end up in rehab under Medicare rules, I could be helpless and homeless by the time I got out.

But this article went on to talk about the concept of community among elders, in this case, a small population within a larger metropolitan area. These seniors were appalled by the prospect of continuation of care facilities where people progress from independent living to assisted living to nursing home in one place— “a place,” they say, “where one enters standing up and leaves in a box.”

A group of these neighbors got together and created a network of like-minded people who were aging but knew they didn’t want to go into a nursing home. They formed a group and started a database, and people volunteered to help each other when someone needed help. They rated and recommended good service providers from plumbers to doctors and home health care aides. Those with cars drove those without. People who loved to cook shared meals and baked cakes. They got out and walked together, and socialized with others as a village.

These senior villages have helped people stay at home for far longer than might have been possible otherwise. A similar concept was talked about a few years ago in Sisters when a project was being considered for progressive senior living but it never got off the ground. Sisters seniors who were no longer able to live alone often had to move to assisted living facilities in Bend, which meant their loved ones had to drive back and forth to provide care. All this cognitive dissonance puts tremendous stress on families, schedules, finances— everyone suffers.

However, in the emerging market in Sisters, we are now hearing about cluster homes, affordable senior housing, assisted living facilities, and more senior services to meet the needs of the growing senior population. These will create perfect “villages” where seniors could be helping seniors remain independent and probably healthier longer by keeping them active and engaged. I hope the people will take the initiative themselves and not wait for the city to make sure our fellow seniors don’t have to choose between safety and independence.

So now I know I have to add to my future healthcare planning process what I would want if I should unexpectedly need care, short-term or long-term… what I can afford if I should need home health care… how to get to doctor appointments, the grocery store, city council meetings… who will take care of Cheech and Chong (my cats) if I need to be hospitalized… who would I call if I fall and I can’t get up? Isn’t it time you should be thinking about it and planning ahead as well?

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

Diane-BtV4x4

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 5/13/15)

by Diane Goble

I know I came into this room for a reason. Let’s see. I got an email from my daughter telling me about… what the heck did she tell me? OK, back to the computer, read the email again. Hmmm…. no, no clue why I felt I had to go into my bedroom to get a… what? Nope, no idea. Also no idea why I’m standing here with the refrigerator door open staring at cold food. I’m not hungry. It’s not time to fix a meal. Did I suddenly need to check expiration dates?

Maybe I should call my daughter. Where’s my phone? After looking everywhere at least three times I have to go over to my neighbor and ask her to call my cell phone. Oh right, there it is, in my bathrobe pocket where I put it last night. Now why was I looking for my phone? Who was I going to call? Maybe a warm bath would help.

I better check my calendar. Oh no, I’m supposed to be at a meeting right now. Where are my notes? My wallet? My car keys? I always forget at least one thing. I start the car to let it warm up while I run back inside to get… ? What did I come back to get? And where did I see it last? Drawing a blank here.

Hello there… I recognize your face but have no idea what your name is. It usually comes to me an hour later but you’re gone so excuse me for not introducing you to my good friend what’s her name.

I came across a healthy brain checklist, which starts out asking if I require assistance remembering appointments, family occasions or taking medications.

Well, if I didn’t keep a calendar I’m sure I would, but even then occasionally I’m so engrossed in writing that I forget to check the clock and suddenly get a call that I forgot to pick up my granddaughter from the elementary school. I found online timer that I can set (when I remember to do so) to give me a heads-up to get ready to go.

Next this brain checklist asks me to check each symptom that is causing me increasing difficulty compared to the past. I’m happy to report most of my problems are symptoms of normal aging, not impending dementia.

However, if I start to notice I’m forgetting important details of things I’ve done recently, forgetting to do things I said I’d do, forgetting recent events or conversations, retelling stories or jokes to the same person, and having trouble completing complex tasks at work or home, such as balancing my checkbook, planning projects, or forgetting a recipe I’ve cooked many times, I might want to mention it to my doctor at my next annual checkup.

Depression can sneak up on us too as we age. If you can’t stop feeling down or blue, that all the pleasure and joy has gone from life; feeling hopeless about the future, that everything is such an effort; feeling low energy or slowing down a lot comparatively speaking, tell your doctor because it could just be your diet, your medications might need to be adjusted, or your body is just telling you to get out of the house and take a short walk every day… and listen to the birds singing just for you.

*****

I wrote this column several weeks ago… before my friend Kelsey Collins ran out of gas, as she put it. Not that my advice above would have refilled her tank and she never asked for my advice anyway. Her way of covering up her pain was to become the opposite… to transmute that energy into compassion for others and she became consumed by that passion until there was nothing left to give and it was time to move on. I saw a determination in her the last week of her life but I didn’t understand why.

The weekend before, she among four of us met and talked about how we could facilitate family conversations about end of life wishes and filling out Advance Healthcare Directives. Kelsey assured us that she had all her paperwork in order and those involved knew her last wishes.

All of us in this group have done that as well, and none of us have any fear of or illusions about death and have already formulated our own exit strategies depending on circumstances. Exit Strategy is the name of Kelsey’s book about her relationship with an elderly woman she cared for through the end of her life.

The Wednesday before, six of us met at our monthly Girls Nite Out dinner at Los Agaves… by far Kelsey’s favorite restaurant. She picked me up because I had had a tooth pulled the day before and was still loopy from pain killers to drive. She came in because she wanted to meet my two new cats, Cheech and Chong, who were finally coming out from under the bed to meet people. We talked about the animals that have gone through our lives and how hard is when we lose them.

At dinner she was Kelsey as usual, loud, vivacious, in your face, sometimes annoyingly so. She didn’t like the wine. She ordered her favorite meal… she ate nothing that had eyelashes! We talked about… nothing important, really.

When she dropped me off, we hugged, said I love you and see you soon. There was no indication that she had already made up her mind to carry out her exit strategy 3 days later— but now I know, she had. Bon voyage, my friend.

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

Diane-BtV4x4

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651