National Healthcare Decisions Day – April 16, 2015

National Healthcare Decisions DayChurchExitIt’s time to get The Conversation started—

How do you feel about discussing your own death??

Do you have religious, spiritual or moral beliefs that may play a part in your views about medical treatments that may extend your life? What are these views?

Does concern about money play a part in making your decisions about medical care? In what way?

Do you worry about being a burden to your loved ones? If so, in what way? How do you think your loved ones would feel about being caregivers?

Would being aware, being free of pain, remaining independent, or other issues about quality of life play a part in your decisions about medical care? How?

How would your loved ones be affected if they had to make decisions about your care? Would they know what you want?

Do you have an Exit Strategy?

Contact your local hospice or Compassion & Choices to get the information you’ll need to have The Conversation with your family and have everyone fill out an Advance Healthcare Directive (state specific) because we never know which day they might become necessary.

If you might be interested in taking part in an online Death Cafe, which is a general conversation about death and dying, please fill out the form below and if enough people are interested, I’ll contact you.

 

Pauline Interviews Near-Death Experiencer Diane Goble

Diane Goble, MS, CCHt

Author, Educator, Spiritual Counselor, Hypnotherapist, Transition Guide

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talks about her near-death experience while drowning and the after-effects

with Pauline (March 2015) in Sisters, Oregon

Part One (14:32)

Part Two (10.03)

Part Three (11:32)

For more information, go to BeyondtheVeil.net

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

Available at amazon.com and bookstores everywhere

The Art of Dying Conference – April 24, 2015

Sisters Sunset 8/21/13The New York Center presents

The Art of Dying Conference

April 24 – 26, 2015

The Art of Dying is a groundbreaking conference that brings together renowned thought-leaders, researchers and practitioners in the area of death and dying,  including the professional fields of palliative and hospice care.

SPEAKERS

Eben Alexander, MD • Leslie Blackhall, MD • Jeanne Denny • Peter Fenwick, MD • Henry Fersko-Weiss, LCSW • Kunchok Gyaltsen, DTM, MPH, PhD • Gary Malkin • Thomas Moore, PhD • Frank Ostaseski • Simcha Raphael, PhD • Stephen Ross, MD • Terese Schroeder-Sheker • Judith Kennedy Schwarz, RN, PhD • Robert A.F. ‘Tenzin’ Thurman, PhD • Pim van Lommel, MD • Michael Gruber, PhD

Near-Death Experiencer Shares Secrets from Beyond the Veil

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Search “Diane Goble” in your device’s ebook store or Google “ebooks by Diane Goble”

or read a sample and purchase directly from publisher (click on title below)

Watch for a New Smashwords Discount Coupon every month

Reincarnation and the Evolution of Consciousness (2013) – 16,000 words – $1.99

Author reading Chapter “The Challenge of Being Fully Human

Author on BlogTalkRadio with Pamela Edmunds’ Bridge Between Two Worlds – 2/12/14

Author on BlogTalkRadio with Pamela Cummins’ The Love Channel Show – 4/15/14

The Path to Peace & Joy (2013) – 15,290 words – $1.99

Author reading Chapter “Chakras

How to Die Consciously: Secrets from Beyond the Veil (2011) – 52,520 words – $2.99

Author reading Chapter “End of Life Conversations

Conversations with a Near-Death Experiencer – Book 1 (2010) – 95,840 words – $3.99

*** MARCH SPECIAL “50% Off” – Use code FJ47W at check out ***

More Conversations with a Near-Death Experiencer – Book 2 (2010) – 70,340 words – $2.99

*** MARCH SPECIAL “50% Off” – Use code ZQ22G at check out ***

Sitting in the Lotus Blossom (2010) – 64,100 words – $2.99

Author reading Chapter “The Wounded Planet

• • • • • • •

The following CDs are suggested in some of Diane’s ebooks

Vocals by Diane Goble • Music by Shapeshifter

Sample and downloads available by clicking on links below

happinessCDHappiness Journey (download) – $1.99

lotusmeditationLotus Meditation (download) – $1.99

Relax1-4Relax2-4Relaxation Exercise 1 & 2 (downloads) – $3.99

ClearingPastCDClearing the Past (download) – $1.99


The Afterlife Awareness Conference – June 4-7, 2015

The 5th Annual Original

AFTERLIFE AWARENESS CONFERENCE

Featuring psychic medium John Holland, Dr. Raymond Moody, Dr. Eben Alexander, out-of-body explorer William Buhlman, authors Anita Moorjani and Annie Kagan (Annie appears via Skype), mediums Suzane Northrop and Hollister Rand, and a stellar lineup of physicians, shamans, scientific researchers, grief counselors, spiritual leaders and more!

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 For information & registration, click link below

The Afterlife Awareness Conference

Thank you for supporting my efforts to raise awareness about end-of life conversations and planning by purchasing your event tickets through this blog 


The Afterlife Education Foundation (AEF) is an Oregon non-profit corporation founded in 2010 in response to the need foran expanded worldwide conversation about the survival of consciousness after death.

 

Physician-assisted suicide addressed in new book by Near-Death Experiencer

Beyond the Veil

Our Journey Home

by Diane Goble

We’re all going to die some day so–

  • shouldn’t we all be looking into this event instead of living in denial and pretending it only happens to other people?

  • shouldn’t we at least have some tools available to us so when it does, however it does, we’re prepared and know what to do next?

  • shouldn’t we prepare ourselves to take care of and comfort a loved one who is terribly ill or elderly and facing their own death?

That’s what I thought when I first began writing this book, which is what I was asked to do when I decided to come back into my body during my near-death experience while drowning during a white water river rafting accident in 1971.

Voilà!

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 The answers to all those questions you have about death, dying and what comes next are between these covers.

The paperback, published by Cosmic Creativity, is now available on amazon.com and at most major book retailers.

Posting reviews or sharing your thoughts about Beyond the Veil on retailer websites, like amazon.com, may contribute to the evolution of human consciousness and are much appreciated by all those who contributed to the publication of this valuable book.


… a way for individuals to consciously prepare for what’s to come, and to better understand the life in their death, and what happens next. Anyone can benefit from this book, so keep it handy. You may use it more often than you think.

~ P.M.H. Atwater, L.H.D., researcher and author of Near-Death Experiences: The Rest of the Story and We Live Forever: The Real Truth About Death

There is no easy way to bring up the conversation of death but Goble’s book shows us why this is one of the most important discussions that we can have.

~ Josie Varga, author of Visits from Heaven and Visits to Heaven

Ultimately learning how to be fully present and conscious for the one who is passing is one of the greatest gifts you can offer someone you love.

~ JoAnn Chambers, Vibrational Sound Healer and co-author of The Sonic Keys: Sound, Light & Frequency; DNA Activation, and The Secret of Abundance


This is a conversation you must have with yourself…

and probably should have with all family members–

not that you need to have all the answers right now, but just to get you started thinking about these important questions before it’s necessary to know the answers so there won’t be any family disagreements in the heat of a crisis. We all need to have these conversations about the end of our lives and what we do want and don’t want as far as treatment options, including invasive procedures, aggressive therapies, prescription drugs, palliative care, hospice,  and when and where we choose to die, depending on the circumstances and based on our own values, traditions and beliefs. Ideally we need to review our choices every 5 years as we get older, if we have health changes, lifestyle changes, because we often make different decisions as our age and circumstances change. We need to think about situations like–

If your heart stopped right now, what is your family’s plan?

Does anyone know where your important papers, passwords, contacts, valuables are kept and what you want done with them and who to contact after you’re gone?

If your persistent headaches led to a diagnosis of an inoperable brain tumor and a diagnosis of 6 months or less to live, would you consider the Death with Dignity option (do you know if it’s available in your state/country, what the requirements are)?

Are you aware that your Emergency Contact is not necessarily your Healthcare Representative unless that person is also designated in your Advance Healthcare Directive/Living Will?

If your spouse had a sudden illness requiring hospitalization, what things would you have to do that you wouldn’t ordinarily do? What if the person had been in an accident and was in a coma?

Do you really know what it means if you say do everything to save me?

Knowing that at some point you will die, how do you hope your death will be? Have you told anyone? Have you contemplated your own death?

Have you considered how you would manage becoming a full-time caregiver for a severely ill child or an elderly parent?

If you are entering your dying process, have you reconciled your life and found peace of mind or do you fear what lies ahead?


Beyond the Veil: Our Journey Home

was written by Diane Goble, a near-death experiencer who became a spiritual teacher, based on what she learned during her journey home and was asked to bring back to share with as many people as she could.
Her primary message is– We Don’t Die!
Her book is a resource manual, chock full of information about the options that are available to us as we are preparing ourselves for transition or being a caregiver for someone who is in the dying process.
It is a training manual based on the author’s professional course to teach caregivers to be Transition Guides for their dying loved ones or patients.
It is a personal workbook with plenty of Notes pages for those soon departing as they are guided through the practice of the Art of Conscious Dying and writing their own Personal Transition Guidebook.
It is printed in large type.

For those of you who need more, go to BeyondtheVeil.net. Diane will be offering classes and webinars with special guests, and private consultations about end-of-life issues and conversations in the near future. If you would like to receive updates, fill out the following form:

“Beyond the Veil: Our Journey Home” by Diane Goble – to be released 1/1/15

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

Beyond the Veil: Our Journey Home

by

Diane Goble

Release Date: January 1, 2015

… a way for individuals to consciously prepare for what’s to come, and to better understand the life in their death, and what happens next. Anyone can benefit from this book, so keep it handy. You may use it more often than you think.

~ P.M.H. Atwater, L.H.D., researcher and author of Near-Death Experiences: The Rest of the Story and We Live Forever: The Real Truth About Death

There is no easy way to bring up the conversation of death but Goble’s book shows us why this is one of the most important discussions that we can have.

~ Josie Varga, author of Visits from Heaven and Visits to Heaven

Ultimately learning how to be fully present and conscious for the one who is passing is one of the greatest gifts you can offer someone you love.

~ JoAnn Chambers, Vibrational Sound Healer and co-author of The Sonic Keys: Sound, Light & Frequency; DNA Activation, and The Secret of Abundance


This is a conversation you must have with yourself and probably should have with all family members–

not that you need to have all the answers right now, but just to get you started thinking about these important questions before it’s necessary to know the answers so there won’t be any arguments in the heat of the moment. We all need to have these conversations about the end of our lives and what we do want and don’t want as far as treatment options, palliative care, hospice care and when and where we choose to die, depending on the circumstances and based on our own values, traditions and beliefs. Ideally we need to reconsider our choices every 5 years as we get older, if we have health changes, lifestyle changes, because we often make different decisions as our age and circumstances change.

If your heart stopped right now, what is your family’s plan?

Does anyone know where your important papers, passwords, contacts, valuables are kept and what you want done with them and who to contact after you’re gone?

If your persistent headaches led to a diagnosis of an inoperable brain tumor and a diagnosis of 6 months or less to live, would you consider the Death with Dignity option (do you know if it’s available in your state/country, what the requirements are)?

Are you aware that your Emergency Contact is not necessarily your Healthcare Representative unless that person is also designated in your Advance Healthcare Directive/Living Will?

If your spouse had a sudden illness requiring hospitalization, what things would you have to do that you wouldn’t ordinarily do? What if the person had been in an accident and was in a coma?

Knowing that at some point you will die, how do you hope your death will be? Have you told anyone? Have you contemplated your own death?

Have you considered how you would manage becoming a full-time caregiver for a severely ill child or an elderly parent?

If you are entering your dying process, have you reconciled your life and found peace of mind or do you fear what lies ahead?


Beyond the Veil: Our Journey Home was written by Diane Goble, a near-death experiencer, based on what she learned during her journey home and was asked to bring back to share with as many people as she could. Her primary message is that We Don’t Die! Her book is a resource manual, chock full of information about the options that are available to us as we are dying or being a caregiver for someone who is in the dying process. It is a training manual to teach caregivers to be Transition Guides for their dying loved ones or patients. It is a personal workbook with plenty of Notes pages for those who are dying as they are guided through the practice of the Art of Conscious Dying and writing their own Personal Transition Guidebook. It is in large print to make it easier to read.


 

Film can start “The Conversation” about end-of-life

I wrote this column which was published in my local newspaper, The Nugget on 12/10/2014, after viewing the beautiful, award-winning documentary “Final Pose,” about a local yoga teacher who developed cancer and in the end decided to use Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act.

I attended the screening of “Final Pose,” an award-winning BendFilm 2014 documentary directed by Karen Mellberg of Bend at The Belfry last week. The film concerns the end-of-life journey of Sisters yogi Myra Lani Fisher through her own voice and was filmed during the last few weeks of her life as she was preparing to use Oregon’s Death with Dignity (DWD) Act.

I didn’t know Myra and only learned about her a few weeks before she transitioned. I wish I could have had a conversation with this very strong woman to learn how she processed her decision to choose this end of life option. Because this is what I do– help people have these conversations about death and dying so they can make informed choices, have discussions among their family members, and fill out the necessary paperwork so their last wishes will be carried out. It probably wouldn’t surprise you that most people find it difficult to even contemplate their own death, much less plan for it.

I spoke with a number of people that night who had no idea this information was available or even that Oregon has had a DWD law since 1997. Very few have talked to their doctor about anything to do with their own death and not many knew about the process one has to go through to request the option. This can be a daunting task for anyone, especially for those who wait until the last possible minute to even try to find information. Just having to make the request twice 15 days apart, much less trying to find a physician who will write a prescription and a pharmacist who will fill it, can take time and perseverance– this where CompassionandChoices.org can help.

It’s certainly not a fit for everybody as one’s dying process isn’t always a terrible ordeal, but for some people, it is… with some diseases, especially certain cancers such as Lani suffered with, it can be excruciatingly painful in spite of the availability of morphine through hospice services. Certainly palliative pain management is helpful for a lot of people, but it’s not universally available, not everybody benefits equally and an individual’s suffering is intangible.

For those who die slowly over a long period of time, especially in their 80s and 90s, continuing to be kept alive only to continue suffering even without pain can be unbearable to some and these patients often beg to die, beg their loved ones to kill them; some take matters into their own hands.

Voluntary Stop Eating and Drinking (VSED) is often the only sanctioned option a person has if they are not terminal (diagnosed with 6 months or less to live), have a degenerative disease or mental problem or are frail elderly. I’ve seen VSED go well for some people and others not so much. We don’t have a perfect system for helping people to die well yet. Medical students are finally starting to receive some training in end of life care and things are slowly beginning to change. Insurance coverage is a whole other issue.

Those who end up in hospitals trying one more resuscitation, one more invasive procedure, one more experimental treatment, often end up on life support beyond what they would have wanted– just because they were too afraid to have the conversation and make some informed decisions about what treatments they would want and not want at the end of their lives. This agony extends to the family and leaves them traumatized for years over whether they did the right thing because they always thought there would be more time and suddenly there is none.

Yes, there are religious objections, and fears of wantonly offing the disabled, the elderly, the vulnerable who are unable to speak for themselves, which is why we need solid laws to prevent coercion and forced extermination. Seventeen years of experience has shown the Oregon DWD Act to be effective and only used by a small percentage of people. And only a small percentage of the people who request their prescription actually fill it, and an even smaller percentage actually end up taking it.

The recent case of Brittany Maynard, a 29-year old woman with incurable brain cancer, a prognosis of a only a few months to live, and the likelihood of an agonizing dying process, has kickstarted the conversation around the country about our right to choose to die on our own terms. She moved to Oregon from California where there is no legal option for aid-in-dying and ended her life last month with the help of Compassion & Choices by self-administering the medication on the day she chose at home in her own bed with her husband and her mother by her side. Isn’t this the way we all want to go?

So now we have this beautiful documentary, a gift from Myra Lani Fisher and Karen Mellberg, about the beauty of life in our own death to give each of us the courage to have those hard conversations we don’t want to have with ourselves or with our families, but which we must… because suddenly there may be no more time.

The boundaries that divide Life and Death are at best shadowy and vague.

Who shall say where the one ends and where the other begins?

~Edgar Allen Poe

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Death with Dignity laws

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The recent death of a 29-year old woman who chose to use the Death with Dignity law in Oregon has invigorated the debate about our right to make choices about our healthcare at the end of our life. Brittany Maynard had a brain tumor that doctors said would end her life in a most undignified manner and she chose not to experience that part of her illness. She completed her Bucket List and enjoyed the last quality time she could with her husband and parents, and died peacefully at the time of her choosing at home in her own bed surrounded by those who loved her.

If you are facing such a decision, whether you are thinking about the Death with Dignity option or not, this book by a Near-Death Experiencer, will help you find acceptance and peace of mind as you navigate medical decisions, care options including palliative and hospice services, conversations with family and providers, filling out Advance Healthcare Directives and making decisions about how your want to die.

Beyond the Veil is for caregivers who will be transition guides for their loved ones, for families to help them have the necessary conversations, and for the dying person who wants desperately to know what is happening to them along their journey home.

Excerpt from Beyond the Veil: our journey home by Diane Goble about Death with Dignity laws:

Reasonable laws can prevent abuse while honoring self-respect, human dignity and compassion. Just as an obstetrician might administer a drug to hasten a birth, a doctor may prescribe a drug that will hasten not death but the rebirth of our spiritual nature. Prepared ahead of time and guided by a transition guide’s voice reading one’s Personal Transition Guidebook, it is a peaceful journey home beyond the veil.

Some people believe it is a slippery slope to allow this at all. They are afraid mentally or physically disabled or senile elderly people will be murdered for convenience. Perhaps in some societies where human life isn’t valued that could be true. It is up to those who believe in death with dignity to make sure laws are in place to prevent forced euthanasia by designating medical professionals and safe procedures to provide humane, compassionate assistance to those who decide of their own free will to exercise this option.

A May 2005 Galllup Poll indicated that 75% of Americans support “euthanasia” for certain patients but only 58% support “doctor-assisted suicide” for the same patients. Use of the term “suicide” was the only difference in the question asked. The Gallup Poll conclusion was that the use of the word caused the apparent conflict in values.

Opponents count on the negative emotional impact of the term. Calling it “suicide” or “murder” conjures up images that clash with religious beliefs and humanitarian values, but have nothing to do with personal choice at the end of life.

This is what Dr. Jack Kervorkian fought for–a patient’s right to choose and the physician’s role at end of life. It’s nobody’s business except the person who is dying, his physician and his family members (and sometimes not the latter). It’s continuing care through the end of life.

Instead of physicians abandoning their patients at the end of their invasive medical treatment options, they could stay with them to provide the medication that will quickly end their suffering if that is their patient’s final request.

Their Hippocratic oath says, firstly, do no harm, but if forcing a person to stay alive while their body  progressively deteriorates for years, whether physically or mentally, isn’t doing harm, I don’t know what is. Seems to me physicians need a better understanding of compassion. Continuing to swear an oath to Greek gods is out of touch with contemporary reality–the earth is not flat and doctors are not gods.

Having “The Conversation” about End of Life Healthcare Planning

The Nugget, Sisters, Oregon – October 15, 2014

Having “The Conversation”

By Diane Goble

Ever since Ben Franklin warned us, “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail,” we’ve been diligently planning for everything — college, career path, marriage, children, home buying, vacations, retirement — everything, that is except our inevitable end of life. We don’t want to think about that so we tend to ignore it or postpone dealing with it, often until it’s too late. We live in the state of denial that keeps us oblivious to the unthinkable fact that this day could be our last on earth.

Hopefully that’s not true for you this day, but statistically, in this country, 1 person dies every 3 seconds, approximately 6800 of us every day, 2,468,435 every year. Most people die from health-related conditions, including (in order) heart disease, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases (COPD) and stroke. Accidents are next down the list. All of these are, to some degree, preventable, treatable, manageable, mitigated by medical care and healthy lifestyle changes, and most of us will survive to live the life we planned to a ripe old age.

And that’s part of the problem. Health care has improved, we’re making progress with many cancers, we’ve recognized the problem of obesity and we’re eating healthier and exercising more so we’re living longer but we’re getting diseases now that people didn’t use to get because they died at earlier ages — Alzheimer’s Disease, in particular, but also emphysema, COPD, Parkinson’s Disease, and diabetes. And with the aging Boomer population, we wonder will there be rationing of medical services.

The health care system has us focused on treatments that almost kill us in order to make us better so we can live longer and get more diseases for them to treat. At the same time there are more people in need of care, there are also fewer doctors and medical services are stretched thin.

And within this maelstrom of activity is the elephant in the room. At some point, we are all going to die — but no one wants to admit it or talk about it and certainly know one wants to plan for it. We always think there will be more time.

This is a quote from this correspondent’s soon to be released book on amazon.com, Beyond the Veil: Our Journey Home, from a woman named Kathy who shared her experience of not planning ahead:

While we had gradually acknowledged to each other that he might not make it, we’d never really accepted it or talked about what it meant. I always thought we’d have a period of time when he was in hospice care when we would talk more and say our goodbyes. While I, and my kids, said lots of goodbyes and I love yous while he was in a coma, he was never able to communicate with us again. I still replay those last few days over and over and wonder how we didn’t know he was so close to the end and wonder if he knew.

There is a lesson in this: to say the things we want to say while we can – and it illustrates why it is so important to plan for the end of our lives, not just for our selves, but for our loved ones as well. We won’t know how we are going to die, where we will be when it happens, who will be with us or if we will be alone, but we can make our choices known about how we want to be treated at that crucial time, which will guide our loved ones to follow our wishes.

We do have some options and they are more likely to be honored if we have discussed them with our family members and doctors, appointed a healthcare representative who supports our wishes through our Advance Healthcare Directive so physicians will know what we want and don’t want if it comes down to that. The biggest hurdle is sitting down to have the conversation.

Realize that this is not a one-time conversation. It may occur in bits and pieces — a question at the dinner table, a comment during a TV program or news story, a shared article from a magazine, a book, a website, a post on Facebook. Over time and with new information or health concerns, you may change your mind several times.

You may have a conversation with your doctor or a clergy member that provides some new insight or clarifies your values. After seeing what another family went through, you may decide you do or don’t want that to happen to you. Visiting a friend in hospice care may change you mind about how soon you would want to bring hospice services into your life or the life of a family member. Advance Healthcare Directives are changeable and should be reviewed every 5 years or as you health changes.

No matter how old you are — and perhaps this is something everyone should do when they first get their driver’s license because those are extremely vulnerable years for accidents — no matter what your health status is, the time to have these important conversations is when you are healthy and mentally competent to make decisions. By the time you are in an ambulance, in the ER, or on your deathbed, it is too late. Leaving it to your distraught family members to decide what you would want during dire circumstances is setting them up for unending grief and trauma over whether they did they right thing — no matter what they did or didn’t do.

Fortunately, right here in Sisters, there are several people, including Kelsey Collins, Sue Stafford, myself and others, who are available to help people sort through the information about Medicare, home health care, palliative care, hospice services, Advance Healthcare Directives, POLST and Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act. Talk to your doctor, talk to your spiritual adviser and by all means, talk with your family about your last wishes — then you don’t have to think about it anymore!

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