R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 8/13/2014)

by

Diane Goble

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, USA)

Fill a glass with water and hold it out in front of you. How heavy would you guess that glass of water is? 8 ounces? 20 ounces? Continue to hold it out at arm’s length while you’re reading this.

The absolute weight doesn’t really matter. It depends on how long you hold it out in front of you. A minute or two is probably not a problem, but hold it out there for an hour, and you’ll likely have an achy arm and shoulder. Hold it all day, and your arm will probably be numb. The weight of the glass of water never changes, but the longer you hold onto it, the heavier it becomes.

The stresses and worries we encounter in our everyday lives are like that glass of water. The longer we hold on to them, the more they hurt us. At some point we can become paralyzed, incapable of functioning at all.

Along with the stressors of everyday living, after what we’ve all been through with the economy collapsing, job losses, foreclosures, budget cuts, political turmoil and wars over the past decade, it seems everybody is filled with fear, anger, anxiety, depression– all symptoms of too much stress.

But here’s the thing– it’s not stress that’s the problem. It’s our reaction to the stressors in our lives that sends us over the edge. The longer we hold onto that glass of water, the heavier it seems to get, the bigger the problem seems to be. We may feel hopeless, helpless, and out of control.

Drugs and alcohol only make matters worse, usually causing more stress within the family, between neighbors, on the roads, at work. They may cover up the problem temporarily, but there’s still the elephant in the room, and until we change our reaction to stress, Dumbo’s not going anywhere.

So how do you change your reaction? By learning to free your mind from its constant stream of repetitive thoughts and restore your stress response system to balance. Get yourself outside, walk around in bare feet, and sit by a river. Close your eyes. Listen to the water rushing downstream.

Pay attention to the sound as your thoughts merge with it and just breathe deeply. When you notice your thoughts intruding, shift your attention back to the sounds from the river. Allow the sounds to fade into the background and listen for the silence between the thoughts. When you become aware of the silence, hold it for as long as you can. With practice, it will teach you better control over your thoughts and reactions when you are under stress.

No river nearby? Go to the labyrinth at Sisters East Portal. Stand at the entrance and pause just to breathe in deeply to calm yourself before you take this journey. Look to the west at the timeless mountains. You are in the now zone. There is nowhere else to be. Nothing else you need to do. You can walk slow or fast, or stop and just breathe.

As you walk, just notice the rocks, the flowers, the insects at your feet; the landscape surrounding you, the blue sky above. Feel the air on your skin; listen to the wind blowing through the trees. Smell the pine-scented air. Become one with your surroundings as you experience a sense of inner peace.

Remember that peaceful state you attained and use your breath to return to it often during your day and whenever issues that trigger your stress response arise.

You can put the glass down now. Notice the feeling of release from stress when you just let go.

Metoilus Meditation


It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been Diane Goble’s life work since her near-death experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 7/16/14)

by

Diane Goble

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon)

My grandfather Frank, my father’s father, popped in to say hello the other day and I was reminded how much I regretted not talking to him more about what life was like for him and Grandma Jo back in the early 1900s.

He used to write me long letters, many pages on both sides, in pencil on yellow legal paper, over the years because after about age 16, I rarely saw them when we moved from Long Island, New York to Miami Beach, Florida. All I remembered hearing as a child, was that they had many adventures traveling across the country from New York to California by train, steamboat, railroad and mule team. I didn’t really appreciate the value of those letters and they got lost along the way as I moved from Miami to Chicago to Los Angels to Tampa to Los Angeles to St. Petersburg and back to Los Angeles leaving many things behind.

Sometime after he and my grandmother died, on a visit to New York with my sister for New Year’s Eve at Times Square, I was going through the attic of their home in the Bronx in the shadow of the Whitestone Bridge, and found a box of those yellow pages he never sent. Again I put that history away and didn’t get around to opening that box until many years later after I moved to Mammoth Lakes, California in 2002.

When I finally opened the box and began reading his words, I dove into a rich history of the opening of the West to civilization. His resume began: “Research, Pioneering, Explorations, and Invasions by a young tenderfoot in and about the realms of the states of New Jersey, New York, California, Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado, Wisconsin, Ohio, and Pennsylvania.”

It began in 1905 at age 16, when he worked construction in the tunnels under Manhattan Island, from the East River to Long Island City for the Pennsylvania Railroad. By 1910 he was a surveyor for New York Central Railroad laying out the track lines around New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Every day after work, he got off the train and was greeted by a plaque quoting Horace Greeley that read: “Go West, young man. Go West and grow up with the country.”

And so he did. He convinced his young bride, Josephine, a young woman with strong religious traditions and a sharpshooter with a 30-ought-six, to accompany him on this adventure. “Boarded the SS Mons SPRR Line. Steamer for New Orleans, Louisiana then via SPRR to El Paso, Texas and the Alamo, Texas and old Mexico– then on via SPRR Flyer to Los Angeles, California. The first sight to see in Los Angeles was the ruins of the Los Angeles Times Bldg. – explosion Sept. 1910.”

Grandma Jo got a job as a switchboard operator in Los Angeles, while Papa G. went off with “a crew of 30 to 35 technical experts to invade and explore the Colorado River from Parker, Arizona to the Grand Canyon” by wagon train and eventually chose the site for and worked on what became Hoover Dam.

They spent their “first Christmas together with the Chemenuevi Indians trading and exchanging cans of tomatoes and evaporated milk for Indian craftsman products while learning to get along with them.” She birthed and nursed my father and his brother between visits as he continued to survey hundreds of miles of interstate highways (I-8 and I-5) and railway lines, and for the construction of 246 miles of 300,000 voltage high-tension transmission lines across the Tehachapi Mountain Range of the Angeles National Forest all the way to Palm Desert. He mentioned the sun shines 365 days a year and temperatures reach 130 degrees by midday.

There’s so much more to tell– Indian encounters, working with Chinese laborers, an infestation of Chuckwallas, floods and snowstorms, Grandma having to fire that 30-ought-six to chase the coyotes out of the campground– but fascinating as it all is, my point in telling this story is that in 1911, he found himself traveling a narrow gauge railroad arriving in the town of Laws, near Bishop, California, in the middle of the water wars when William Mulholland was stealing the water rights from the farmers in Owens Valley to build his aqueduct to bring water to green the desert called Los Angeles. Papa was there with a survey crew to surreptitiously find a good place to build a damn.

That dam created Crowley Lake in the Long Valley Caldera, which resulted from a mega-volcanic eruption 760,000 years ago in the Sierra Nevada Range, south of the Cascades, at the base of Mammoth Mountain, where I sat reading about my grandfather’s adventures… one hundred years later.

Needless to say, my dog Spirit and I retraced his steps through the gorge, from where they put in at Tom’s Place off a dirt road, which is now SR 395 to Casa Diablo, the resurgent dome where the Paiute used to hold sweat lodges and ceremonies, which still boils and heaves, threatening the town of Mammoth Lakes to this day. I walked in his footprints and probably peed on the same rocks that he did.

When I think about it, I experience those regrets about not having read his letters as a teenager and not asking him about his life when he was alive… and I wish my grandchildren would ask me about the history I lived through. Of course they won’t… but I won’t just leave them a box of yellowed papers, I’m writing a book about my adventures through history.

###

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been her life work since her experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 5/21/14)

by

Diane Goble

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon)

You know how you sometimes read an article about some disease and you start thinking you have all the symptoms so you must have that disease? This month is dedicated to Mental Health Awareness and I was just looking at an infographic someone shared on Facebook titled “Facing Mental Illness” and I realized, OMG, we’re all crazy!!

1 in 17 Americans live with a serious mental illness, 6.1 million are bipolar, 15.7 million suffer from depression, 1 in 5 children have had a seriously debilitating mental disorder, 9.6 million adults have ADHD. No wonder the world is in such a mess.

Of course back in the ’60s they turned all the people with mental problems loose for humanitarian reasons leaving them to fend for themselves on the streets. Now they just give people drugs to control their symptoms, which patients then forget to take because of their symptoms and they spiral out of control.

The infographic put out by NIMH and the Mayo Clinic states that “Mental illnesses are medical conditions that disrupt a person’s thinking, feeling, mood, ability to relate to others and daily functions. Mental illnesses affect tens of millions of people each year, only a fraction of whom receive treatment.” Instead, $100 Billion is spent annually in the United States on addiction treatment, incarceration, homeless shelters and other preventable difficulties, like lost productivity at work, road rage, domestic violence, mass shootings.

Ya think that’s because there’s such a stigma about “mental” issues? This is where education comes in. A mental health problem is no different than a physical health problem that needs diagnosis and treatment. It’s all in the same body– what affects your mind affects your body and vice versa.

Mental health issues can occur at any time in life, including in utero. Life happens! It could be biological, caused by a virus; it could be the result of an injury, especially to the head; it could be the result of a traumatic event or extreme fear or mind control or drugs. It could be the result of a trauma suffered in a past life and you need to see a past-life regression therapist to clear the energy.

It isn’t your fault and it isn’t a curse or a spell or the work of the devil. So get over it. If you’re depressed, addicted, obsessive, angry, not thinking right, not functioning in the world, take your bad self in for a check up. Life is too short, and full of fun and interesting things to do and people to meet to waste time worrying about what other people think. That’s just nuts!

Too many people resist treatment because they believe it isn’t serious, that they can treat it themselves with positive affirmations or that it is a personal weakness rather than a serious illness that can be treated with an integrated approach, perhaps a medication and a daily yoga class. We owe it to ourselves and our families to educate ourselves about these bodies we walk around in.

“For 65 years, Mental Health America and our affiliates across the country have led the observance of May is Mental Health Month by reaching millions of people through the media, local events and screenings. The 2014 May is Mental Health Month theme is ‘Mind Your Health.’ Our goals are to build public recognition about the importance of mental health to overall health and wellness; inform people of the ways that the mind and body interact with each other; and provide tips and tools for taking positive actions to protect mental health and promote whole health.

A good place to start your education online is at MentalHealthAmerica.net and look for support groups and mental health experts in your community.

###

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience light bulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been her life work since her experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 4/16/15)

by

Diane Goble

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon)

My best friend just had her second mastectomy last week. In the last two years, she’s had her gall bladder removed, a lumpectomy, a mastectomy and now this one. She says the good news is that she’s lost 20 pounds and can see her toes again!

She has several messages on her cell phone asking her to call another oncologist for follow-up. She’s procrastinating. “It’s not in my lymph nodes so I’m not going for radiation or chemo,” she says. “I’m done with the medical stuff.” She insists she’s going to eat better, exercise more, take up yoga and meditation, and try to be as healthy as possible until she dies. She’s contemplating an artistic tattoo to obscure her now breastless chest.

That’s the rub. You can go through all the treatments and deal with all the side effects of them– sick as a dog and wanting to die most of the time. You maybe get a few good months and then it comes back with a vengeance and you die anyway. The outcome is the same. The difference is the quality of life in between.

This doesn’t have any thing to do with age. My friend is 5 years younger than I am. It can happen to us at any time in our lives. We have jobs to get to, children to raise, relationships to deal with, bills to pay, retirement to plan for, and then suddenly we have to make these decisions about what we want and don’t want because we are diagnosed with a serious illness or have a life-threatening accident.

I had a stage IV melanoma a while back. Had the Moh’s surgery, no problems, no lymph node involvement. That follow-up oncologist wanted to do radiation and possibly chemo, but I said no thanks. I’ve been in remission for almost 8 years. That doesn’t mean it won’t still come back. One or two spots I’d probably have them removed but that with a vengeance thing not so much. I’ll start planning for the end of my days.

I don’t have a problem with dying. I did that once. Drowned. It was a fantastic journey home and back again. I expect it to be the same the next time, only without the back again, so I look forward to moving on to what comes next… because I know there’s a next. Of course I’ll miss my family and friends but I know I’ll see them again soon.

My concern is more about what will happen to me while I’m still in a body. I refuse to put up with Alzheimer’s. Any inkling of that and I’m making my going away party plans before I forget how! I’ve filled out my Advance Healthcare Directive and appointed a non-family member as my healthcare representative so my children don’t have to make any decisions. They don’t want to talk about it so I sent them their copies and included a video of me telling them my decisions about what I want and don’t want. I’d opt for a heart attack over a prolonged illness, but if it were an illness, I’d be working on the paperwork for physician aid-in-dying the moment I got that 6 months to live diagnosis.

So how does one decide what they want at the end of their life? It has to be based on one’s own beliefs and values, not forced on you by someone else’s biases. Talk to your family, your doctor, your spiritual advisor, search your soul, search the Internet… meditate, pray, talk to God or a tree. Educate yourself about the process. There are some good videos out these days about death and dying– “Consider the Conversation,” “How to Die in Oregon,” “The Day I Died: The mind, the brain, and near-death experiences.” The more you know, the better decisions you can make about your own healthcare at the end of life.

Today is April 16th National Healthcare Decisions Day… think about it!

###

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience, “but I’m working on it.”

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience lightbulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been her life work since her experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

 

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 3/12/15)

by

Diane Goble

(This is a monthly column I write for my local weekly newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon, starting from October 2013)

I’m not sure where the line is between clutter and hoarding. I’m reminded of an old George Carlin monologue about “stuff.” We start out in life with nothing but then we start accumulating stuff and when we get new stuff, we don’t throw out the old stuff. We put it up on shelves or in a closet until it gets filled up then we start filling up the rooms, the attic, the garage. Next we need a storage space to hold our old stuff.

The only reason we buy a house is for a place to put our stuff while we go out and get more stuff. A house is just a cover over our stuff. If we didn’t have stuff, we wouldn’t need a house. We’d be free to come and go, just walk around, hang out here, go there. Instead, we keep buying new stuff to replace the old stuff until we have to buy a bigger house with a bigger garage to store all our bigger stuff.

And then we die and leave it to our family to figure out what to do with our stuff. My mother was pretty good about it and had years to work on it. She decluttered so much that she threw out all the family albums so my entire childhood photographic history was wiped out. My father, who suddenly dropped dead at 62, left me with three warehouses full of stuff scattered from southern to central California, two businesses, major debts and IRS problems, an outdated will, and a vengeful estranged wife.

One of my neighbors died recently, 92 years old– almost barricaded into her small apartment by her stuff. It took over a month for family and friends to sort through all she had accumulated. They could have opened a store with all the knicknacks and art supplies, decorations and cat toys; some items never used, never opened. It wasn’t pretty.

Which brings me to the purpose of my column– to suggest that spring is in the air and it’s a good time for cleaning out the old and de-cluttering your living space. Just Google “how to declutter” and you’ll find plenty of helpful tips like: Set a goal– give away 50 things or eliminate one box per month or spend 15 minutes a day sorting through piles. Rotate your clothes/shoes to find out what you don’t wear and get rid of those. Ask your children if there is anything they want and give it to them now while you can see them enjoy it. Re-gift items you’ve never opened. Bring unwanted books and magazines to retirement homes or hospitals. Write a blog with photos to document your decluttering adventure.

You can sell your stuff on Craig’s list or ebay or have a garage sale but it can be gut-wrenching to find out you may only get 10¢ on the dollar for your treasures. You might feel better if you donate your gently used stuff, say to Habitat for Humanity to help them build homes for families in need.

Along with that, get all your paperwork in order, decide what you want done with the remainder of your stuff, gather all your records in one place to make easier on those who have to pull it all together after you kick the bucket.

###

It’s time to have The Conversation

The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork in order so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. It will save them a lot of worry and grief if they know what you would want them to do under certain circumstances if you are unable to speak for yourself.

How will they know unless YOU tell them?

How will they know where to find important papers if YOU don’t tell them?

This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

Nobody wants to talk about death, especially their own… but we are all going to die some day… consider how it would affect your loved ones if you died before your next breath… then don’t put it off out of fear of bringing it on. It doesn’t work that way.

It will give everybody peace of mind and if there is an accident or emergency health crisis, your family will be able to spend time with you instead of rummaging around for paperwork and phone numbers, and all that other stuff we tend to put off.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body behind, in full consciousness, fully alive and aware of everything going on around her then traveling through a void on an amazing journey accompanied by a loving being of light who opened her consciousness to remembering all we forget when we become human beings, including that this is what happens every time the body dies.

We don’t die!

We are not our bodies

Bodies are temporary vehicles that allow us to experience life on this planet

Like astronauts wear space suits, we wear human suits

We are spiritual beings having human experiences as part of our eternal spiritual journey

When our body gives out, we return home

How you want to interpret that, what that means about your religious beliefs or lack of, what that says about God, has nothing to do with this cycle of life. Any of those belief systems can be incorporated into this practice to help you to have a peaceful transition experience with full awareness about what is going on and what comes next.

“Who we really are is all but beyond human understanding,” says author Diane Goble, who has spent the past 44 years since her NDE searching to find the words that describe her experience.

In Beyond the Veil, which is the 5th generation of her writings, including a training course for caregivers as transition guides, she has integrated the knowledge she absorbed during her NDE with her exploration of ancient mystery schools, world religions, and science, and years of meditation practice and spiritual explorations to convey the meaning of the message she was given to share so it makes sense to most people.

This is your opportunity to raise your consciousness and go beyond what you think you know. Each time you read it, you will experience light bulb moments as you realize you too know this but had forgotten. As you practice the exercises, you will come to a deeper understanding of who you really are and the meaning of this life to your soul’s journey.

 

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It has been her life work since her experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now Diane Goble has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious and engaged in their journey home.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… (originally published 2/5/14)

by

Diane Goble

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon)

I had the sad experience of losing my best friend and companion of ten years 15 months ago but I’ve managed to turn that into a positive. Spirit was an Aussie-Chocolate/White Lab with a personality that drew everyone to her. She always carried one of her stuffed animals in her mouth when we walked around Sisters. People would stop their cars or walk across the street to say hello to her. One day she was carrying her Mallard Duck and a man walking by commented, “I see she caught her breakfast! Good dog.” It was her job to put a smile of people’s faces and warm their hearts.

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It got really hard the last six months. A walk around the block became an hour struggle– in bad weather, late at night, a nightmare. She had two ACL surgeries years before and her hip dysplasia was getting really bad. Sometimes she would just collapse and not be able to get up, and, rain or shine, I’d have to sit and wait until she could get up or go get my car. Our walks became shorter and shorter. Then came the day she just couldn’t get up anymore and I couldn’t carry her. I felt like my life was over too.

After a few months of being really distraught, I realized my body was cramping up. This hurt. That hurt. I seemed to be not breathing more than I was breathing. My blood pressure was up. My weight was up. I was depressed. Not going out. This can’t be good. Something had to change.

And so I started walking. Hurt like the dickens! My feet hurt. My knees hurt. My hips hurt. I was out of breath. And I realized I hadn’t been walking for the past year because as Spirit slowed down, I slowed down with her, and when she was gone, I no longer had a reason to walk. But now I felt the spirit of Spirit walking with me and I was able to pick up speed and walk further, and I started feeling better. I got up every morning at the crack of dawn no matter what the weather and stretched my daily walk into three miles in less than an hour.

Unfortunately that only lasted a year because my hips really began to bother me, even occasionally having to use a cane around the house. I was afraid I might fall and not be able to get myself home. Then I tripped one day going up a curb in town and jammed my knee, and that essentially ended my walking.

The good news is I’ve adapted and gotten myself into a modified daily exercise routine and nutrition program that keeps me feeling good. I used to do yoga but hadn’t done it regularly for years. I have to take thyroid medication every morning, and I can’t eat for at least half an hour so my new exercise routine has become: wake up, take pill, do yoga for 45 minutes, then have breakfast before getting on the computer.

I adopted a cat a few months ago… needed another fur person in my life and decided on one that didn’t need to be taken for walks. Coco does yoga with me every morning. Well, at least she entangles herself with my body until I stop and comb her, and then she goes back to sleep. She’s a Tabby-Siamese with beautiful blue eyes, 3 or 4 years old.

cocopuff

So for people who think they can’t change or can’t get themselves to exercise or think life is just too much sometimes, take your spirit for a walk or do yoga or Sweatin’ to the Oldies or Zumba. Just do it every day where it fits into your routine. It can give you a whole new outlook on life and your body stays healthier longer. Message from Spirit– smile :)

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The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork together so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body in full consciousness, traveling through a void on a peaceful journey accompanied by a loving being of light that filled her with unconditional love, to an indescribably beautiful place where she was given a message to return with and share as widely as she could, that… we don’t die!

We are spiritual beings having human experiences and when we leave these human bodies, we continue along our spiritual journeys. We simply return home to the Source, the One, and we retain the essence of who we really are.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been her life work since her experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

ebooks and meditations by Diane Goble

ebooks4blog

Search “Diane Goble” in your device’s ebook store or Google “ebooks by Diane Goble”
or read a sample and purchase directly from publisher (click on title below)

Watch for a New Smashwords Discount Coupon every month

Reincarnation and the Evolution of Consciousness

(2013) 16,000 words – $1.99

Author reading Chapter “The Challenge of Being Fully Human

Author on BlogTalkRadio with Pamela Edmunds’ Bridge Between Two Worlds – 2/12/14

Author on BlogTalkRadio with Pamela Cummins’ The Love Channel Show – 4/15/14

The Path to Peace & Joy

(2013) 15,290 words – $1.99

Author reading Chapter “Chakras

How to Die Consciously: Secrets from Beyond the Veil

(2011) 52,520 words – $2.99

Author reading Chapter “End of Life Conversations

Conversations with a Near-Death Experiencer – Book 1

(2010) 95,840 words – $3.99

More Conversations with a Near-Death Experiencer – Book 2

(2010) 70,340 words – $2.99

*** AUGUST SPECIAL 50% OFF ***

*** Use code LE79Y at check out ***

Sitting in the Lotus Blossom

(2010) 64,100 words – $2.99

Author reading Chapter “The Wounded Planet

• • • • • • •

The following CDs are suggested in some of Diane’s ebooks

Vocals by Diane Goble • Music by Shapeshifter

Sample and downloads available by clicking on links below

happinessCDHappiness Journey (download) – $1.99

lotusmeditationLotus Meditation (download) – $1.99

 

Relax1-4Relax2-4

Relaxation Exercise 1 & 2 (downloads) – $3.99

ClearingPastCDClearing the Past (download) – $1.99


 

Diane Goble’s ebook “How to Die Consciously: Secrets from Beyond the Veil” is now available printed in large type as a workbook to help patients and caregivers work together towards having a peaceful, dignified deathing experience… Beyond the Veil: Our Journey Home… at all major book retailers.

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R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… 01/05/14

by

Diane Goble

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon)

I had surgery last month– relatively minor, a parathyroidectomy– as an outpatient at St. Charles Hospital, but still it was under general anesthesia and the surgeon did have to slit my throat!

At the pre-admission interview I was asked if I had an Advance Healthcare Directive. I said yes, knowing I had filled it out some years ago covering every contingency I could think of indicating no resuscitation, no feeding tubes, no transfusions, no drastic measures.

Then the nice lady passed me a paper to sign waiving anything in my AHD about resuscitation, transfusions, etc. if my heart stops beating or anything goes wrong during surgery. Excuse me? If I didn’t sign it, I couldn’t have the surgery.

I signed because I really wanted to have this surgery and I figured the odds of anything going wrong were slim… and nothing went wrong, I’m fully recovered. Feeling much better, thank you.

Then the other day I read a news story about a 13-year old girl who had a tonsillectomy and is now brain dead. The hospital wants to pull the plug, the parents hold out hope that she’s going to wake up. Who gets to decide when there is no AHD? This could be another Terry Schiavo case.

Many people live in death denial. When it comes up, there’s shock, panic, confusion… there’s guilt, shame, fear. This can’t be happening to me! to my child! to my mother! to my partner!

We pretend it’s never going to happen and try not to think about it– but this doesn’t just happen to others– it can happen to people we love and care about, and can’t bear the thought of losing.

As the year draws to a close and families gather together, it’s a good time to consider your own future healthcare plans and open up The Conversation at the dinner table with all family members present. Age or health is irrelevant because we are all going to kick the bucket one day.

Death is a family affair and it will help everybody to know how you want it to go when your time comes. This isn’t about your money and possessions– that’s a different conversation. In order to know which healthcare options you want and don’t want in an emergency or end of life situation, you have to look at all the possibilities and write them down, otherwise other people, probably strangers, could be making these decisions for you if you are unable to do so yourself.

What if? What if you have a heart attack? get cancer? get hit by a truck? are badly burned? are in a persistent vegetative state? Do you want artificial hydration and nutrition? to be put on a ventilator? for how long? what about quality of life? Help each other make these decisions now to prevent arguments, mistakes, wrongdoings, and guilt during a health crisis.

Get the information and have the conversation– and it’s not just one conversation because circumstances change. Review your Advance Healthcare Directive every 5 years or if your health changes or you change your mind about something. This isn’t just for us of a certain age– include your children as well.

Contact compassionandchoices.com for state-specific forms and theconversationproject.org about having The Conversation… then attend one of my free Future Heathcare Planning sessions (watch Announcements).

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The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork together so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body in full consciousness, traveling through a void on a peaceful journey accompanied by an loving being of light that filled her with unconditional love, to an indescribably beautiful place where she was given a message to return with and share as widely as she could, that… we don’t die!

We are spiritual beings having human experiences and when we leave these human bodies, we continue along our spiritual journeys. We simply return home to the Source, the One, and we retain the essence of who we really are.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been her life work since her experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

R&RonMcKenzie

Of a certain age… 11/27/13

by

Diane Goble

(This is a monthly column I write for my local newspaper, The Nugget, in Sisters, Oregon)

I’m poised on the leading edge of that age group in the U.S. that is increasing by 400,000 people a year. When the first of the Baby Boomers hit 75, it will swell to over a million a year. That’s only 7 years from now.

Seventy-five is about the age many of us will start to need assistance with daily living. It starts with small things– forgetting to pay bills, missing appointments, letting the dishes pile up. Once we have to stop driving, it presents us with new challenges to living on our own. We have to rely more and more on others, and that’s really hard. We become more isolated and spend more time alone sitting in front of the TV.

Just as there comes a time to stop driving, there comes a time when we really shouldn’t live alone anymore. We may be bull-headed enough to put up a fight, insisting we can manage on our own with just a little extra help, until we set the kitchen on fire or walk out the door and forget where we live.

The point I’m trying to make is that we need to be pro-active. We need to do the research, talk to family members, consult with our doctor, and put some plans in writing before the decision is out of our hands.

Let’s take a look at this booming industry out there just waiting to take care of all our needs. You might want to buy stock in assisted living corporations now if you hope to survive because now it can cost between $3,000 and $5,000 a month, $8,000 or more if you have dementia. Imagine what it will cost 7 years from now! And this is just assisted living, not nursing home care. I don’t know about you, but if I asked everybody I know to help, I wouldn’t be able to pay the first month’s rent!

So what does “assisted” mean? Assisted living is not for people who are sill playing golf or hiking the Sisters. It’s not for people who still drive or go south for the winter. And it’s not for people who need continuing medical care or have advanced dementia. It’s for people in between who are still somewhat active, but in declining health, who may need a walker or a wheelchair, who can still take care of most of their personal needs, but who need increasing assistance.

Most of us want to stay in our own homes as long as we can, even die in our own beds, but things don’t always go the way we’d like. Maybe you’re lucky enough to have children or other family members near-by who can visit you at home or who you can stay with for a while, though that can be very stressful all around and may not be a good long-term solution.

Sometimes we lose control over what happens to us and we’re forced into assisted living against our will. It could be the next step following a hospital admittance and 30-days in rehab– a broken hip, stroke, heart attack, auto accident, a fall in the bathtub. Your life changes instantly!

As I begin to think about this possibility for myself, I notice that, except for a couple of board and care homes, there is no assisted living facility in Sisters. What does that say about a community that doesn’t provide for its elders? This means a move to Bend or Redmond, and the likelihood of my children and grandchildren coming to visit me with any regularity, given their busy lives, is slim to none. That’s a lonely thought.

We may not want to go into assisted living but circumstances may force us in and it’s better to have some options for our children to evaluate if something should happen to us and they are forced to make a hasty decision on our behalf. Your preferences and choices should be included with your Advanced Healthcare Directive and other end-of-life paperwork so your family knows what you would want if you are unable to speak for yourself. And, of course, you have all that paperwork taken care of, right?

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The best gift you can give your family is to have all your paperwork together so they can carry out your end of life wishes if it becomes necessary. This workbook will help you and your loved ones have the conversations needed to make the decisions beforehand that they might be called upon to make for you in an emergency situation. Doing everything is not always the best response… and hope is not a plan.

For those who experience fear of death, this near-death experiencer describes leaving her drowning body in full consciousness, traveling through a void on a peaceful journey accompanied by an loving being of light that filled her with unconditional love, to an indescribably beautiful place where she was given a message to return with and share as widely as she could, that… we don’t die!

We are spiritual beings having human experiences and when we leave these human bodies, we continue along our spiritual journeys. We simply return home to the Source, the One, and we retain the essence of who we really are.

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

It has been her life work since her experience in 1971 to share this message and to teach the art of conscious dying, and now she has put her teachings into a workbook to help families talk to each other, their doctors, and their higher consciousness as they prepare to leave this phase of life and transition to the next, fully conscious.

Available everywhere – ISBN 9780963860651

Afterlife Awareness Conference now available live stream

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Click HERE to watch the Afterlife Awareness Conference streaming live through Beyond Words! Purchase it once and watch it as many times as you like, as often as you like, forever!

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