Assisted-Death Debate – blogs and news from around the world – August 2012

End-of-Life discussions about Assisted Dying/Suicide/Euthanasia in news articles, blogs, videos from the left, right and center during the month of August 2012. This is a place to find out what’s being talked about around the world as we sort out this highly emotional and controversial issue.

Become informed, open your mind,  join in the discussions. Don’t be swayed by emotional euphenisms or dysphemisms, or religious dogma. Our leaders need to know what people are thinking and we need to know what our leaders are considering in terms of laws. These are conversations we all need to have! The end result should be reasonable laws that protect the vulnerable yet allow self-determination at the end of life for those who want the option of assistance.

NATIONAL/INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Care Not Killing
Committee Against Physician-Assisted Suicide

Compassion & Choices
Death with Dignity
Dignitas
Dying with Dignity
Euthanasia Prevention Coalition
Final Exit Network
Not Dead Yet
Patient Rights Council

BLOGS

Death with Dignity National Center – Living with Dying – This Week in the Movement
August 3
August 10
August 17
August 24
August 31

Laws Should Reflect Diversity of Opinions by Melissa Barber, Death With Dignity National Center (6/28/12)

Allow doctors to support patient wishes by Melissa Barber, Death With Dignity National Center (8/10/12)

Terminal Cancer and Euthanasia – a conversation

Huge crackdown on fake drug production in China – Assisted-Dying Blog of Derek Humphry (8/6/12) -If you buy drugs from China, please check out this article and exercise caution.

Bad News for anti-euthanasia campaigners – Udo Schuklenk’s Ethx Blog (8/12/12)

New laws allowing physician-assisted suicide opposed by doctors and Catholic Church – Why Evolution Is True (8/12/12)

Unitarian Debate – Issue of the Moment: Assisted Dying – Does the law need to change?

A Theological Look at Suicide – Pastor Zach’s Blog

Death With Dignity: Positive data on why it works… – Jan’s Stinkin Blog

Assisted Suicide, The Courts and the ECHR by Tobias Thienel – Invisible College Blog – School of Human Right, The Netherlands

Euthanasia is a Cultural Addiction – Secondhand Smoke by Wesley J. Smith (8/16/12)

UK Paralyzed Man Loses Euthanasia Court Request – Secondhand Smoke by Wesley J. Smith, (8/16/12)

The case for assisted dying – New Humanist Blog

The Browser: The Case for Assisted Dying by Raymond Tallis (8/17/12)

Crisp: Dr. Kervorkian had it right about assisted suicide (8/20/12)

Crisp: Assisted suicide as an option (8/21/12)

LeisureGuy: Later On – The case for assisted dying (8/21/12)

LeisureGuy: Later On – Assisted Dying (Tony Prachett Video) (8/22/12)

Compassion & Choices – The Psychology of Aging and End-of-Life Planning by Jason E. Schillerstrom,MD – ABC News (8/22/12)

On assisted suicide Free Thought Blogs by Christina (8/22/12)

US, UK medical journals increasingly tout euthanasia – Catholic World News (8/23/12)

Man who fought for his own assisted suicide dies – SNS Post (8/23/12)

Worrying about “Our Neurotic Fear of Suffering” Secondhand Smoke by Wesley J. Smith (8/24/12)

Tony Nicklinson: Can law change on assisted dying and protect vulnerable – One News Page (8/24/12)

Truth and Charity Forum – Do No Harm?: Medical Journals Show increasing Support for Euthanasia by Denise J. Hunnell, MD (8/24/12)

Choice in Dying: Why can’t opponents (or very tentative supporters?) of assisted dying get it right? by Eric MacDonald (8/25/12)

Jack Kervorkian comes to town, Opinion of Tom Keane in boston.com (8/26/12)

Why assisted suicide is the right answer, for some by John M. Grohol, PSYD – PsychCentral.com: World of Psychology (8/27/12)

Shortage of helium worldwide – Assisted-Dying Blog (8/27/12)

Compassion & Choices – The Conversation Project: It’s time to start talking about end of life by Joseph Nowinski (8/29/12)

HuffPost 50 – The Conversation Project: It’s time to start talking about end of life by Joseph Nowinski, PhD (8/29/12)

Physicians’ emotional, institutional barriers propping medical futility at end of life by Sarah Guy, medwireNews Reporter (8/29/12)

Dreaming of Call Bells – Is there such a thing as a “good” death? (8/29/12)

BOOKS

The Amateur’s Guide to Death & Dying by Richard Wagner

In Search of Gentle Death: the Fight for Your Right to Die With Dignity by Richard N. Cote

How to Die Consciously: Secrets from Beyond the Veil by Diane Goble

BROADCASTS

ACLU Podcast: Death with Dignity (8/15/12)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Reason why physicians do not have discussions about poor prognosis, why it matters, and what can be improved by Jennifer W. Mack and Thomas J. Smith in Journal of Clinical Oncology

MAGAZINES

Assisted Suicide: Court Rules That Locked-in Syndrome Sufferer Does Not Have Right to Die – RELEVANTMagazine.com (8/21/12)

VIDEOS

Physician-Assisted Suicide – behavenet.com

Los Angeles Times chat: Columnist Steve Lopez on death with dignity in California

Dying with Dignity: Respecting choices with end of life care – WKBT LaCrosse, Wisconsin

The Last Chapter – End of Life Decisions – West Virginia PBS

Fixing to Die – 60 Minutes

Mark Solock Blog – New laws allowing physician-assisted suicide opposed by doctors and Catholic Church

Edward Tarte, former Catholic priest, now an atheist talks about death with dignity

Choosing Death

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UNITED STATES

(News this month from California, Colorado, Connecticut, DC, Florida, Hawaii, Louisiana, Kansas,  Maine,  Massachusetts, Montana, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina Texas, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin)

CALIFORNIA

Steve Lopez: After a ‘barbaric death,’ a call for change – LA Times (8/6/12 ) – My Sunday column on the “barbaric death” of a terminally ill man near Sacramento, and his wife’s plea for an Oregon-like Death With Dignity law in California, brought responses from those wanting to know how to join such a cause.

As I’ve reported before, there is no current campaign for such a change. The best place to get involved in the greater movement, though, and to check on legal developments around the country that could one day have an impact in California, is to visit www.compassionandchoices.org. The no-profit advocates for more end-of-life options and alternatives to often-futile, budget-busting medical procedures that can end up doing little more than prolonging the dying process.

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Steve Lopez: End of life case in New Mexico may affect California – LA Times (8/14/12) – There’s no way to predict when or if California will offer what’s known in Oregon and Washington as Death with Dignity, or physician-assisted aid in dying, but I’ll keep you posted on a case in New Mexico that could have implications here.

In the New Mexico case, said Kathryn Tucker, legal affairs director for a nonprofit advocacy group called Compassion & Choices, “We hope to clarify … that a vague statute that makes a crime of ‘assisting suicide’ does not reach the conduct of a physician providing aid in dying, because of course the choice of a dying patient for a peaceful death is not, and ought not be conflated with, ‘suicide.'”

Tucker said the case in question involves a woman with advanced uterine cancer who has said she would like to have, as one option, the right to avoid prolonged suffering by obtaining doctor-prescribed medication she could ingest to bring about a peaceful death if she finds her dying process unbearable.

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Husband won’t be charged in wife’s suicide by Tony Perry– LA Times (8/23/12) – Criminal charges will not be filed against an 88-year-old San Marcos man who sat beside his ailing wife as she committed suicide, the San Diego County district attorney’s office announced Wednesday.

After a thorough review, the office decided that it could not meet “the ethical and legal burden” of proving a charge of “assisted suicide” against Alan Purdy, according to a spokesman for Dist. Atty. Bonnie Dumanis.

Purdy, a semiretired engineer, did not try to stop his wife as she swallowed apple sauce mixed with sleeping pills and put a plastic bag over her head.

“Yes, I sat beside her as she died,” Purdy told The Times weeks after the death. “I didn’t want her to feel abandoned. I wanted her to know that I loved her.”

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Assisted suicide: The last frontier of civil rights? by Logan Jenkins UT San Diego (8/28/12) – There’s no courtroom in the country, for example, that would have found Alan Purdy, 88, guilty of a felony for tearfully witnessing the suicide of Jo, his 84-year-old wife who suffered crippling pain from a variety of ailments.

In a sense, it would have been a crime against nature not to stand by her as she ate the sedative-laced apple sauce and placed a plastic bag over her head.

She had informed her husband and children of her decision, a course they opposed. She received counseling from health professionals. After listening to the pro-life argument, “Jo simply told them, after a bit, to buzz off,” Alan told a U-T San Diego reporter.

“Yes, I sat beside her as she died,” Purdy told The Times weeks after the death. “I didn’t want her to feel abandoned. I wanted her to know that I loved her.”

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COLORADO

Physician-Assisted Suicide (PAS) – Sisters of Charity Health System – Physician-Assisted Suicide refers to the unethical practice of physicians providing the means of death at a patient’s request. Usually, this will be by supplying or writing a lethal prescription for medications. The patient, however, and not the physician, ultimately administers these drugs. This differs from Euthanasia, because the physician does not act directly by, for example, actually administering a lethal injection in order to end the patient’s life. Both euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are unethical, and neither can be permitted in a Catholic health care facility. It is never ethical to take the life of an innocent person, even at his or her request, or to help a person take his or her own life.
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CONNECTICUT

UK man who failed to overturn euthanasia law diesby Maria Cheng – The Hour Online (8/23/12) – Tony Nicklinson, paralyzed and unable to speak, found life so unbearable he wanted to die. On Wednesday, the 58-year-old Briton got his wish.

His family said he died of pneumonia at home.

In January, Nicklinson asked the High Court to declare that any doctor who killed him with his consent would not be charged with murder. Last week, the court rejected his request, a decision that Nicklinson said had left him “devastated and heartbroken.”

Experts weren’t sure what impact, if any, his death might have on the ongoing euthanasia debate in Britain.

Penney Lewis, a law professor at King’s College London, said previous deaths of euthanasia advocates didn’t have any effect on changing laws to allow the practice.

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D.C.

Medical journals show increasing support for euthanasia – by Denise Hunnell, MD – LifeNews.com (8/24/12) – The British Medical Journal (BMJ), a publication distributed to the members of the British Medical Association, devoted much of its June 14, 2012, issue to endorsing voluntary euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. Raymond Tallis, emeritus professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Manchester, argues in this issue that respect for patient desires and autonomy renders irrelevant any opinion on the matter by the Royal College of Physicians or the British Medical Association. Therefore, all opposition to euthanasia is merely inappropriate paternalism and should be dropped.

In this same issue, Tess McPherson relates the difficult last days of her mother, Ann McPherson, and uses this painful experience as a call for legalized physician assisted suicide and euthanasia. Rather than seeking better pain control, she argues that death is the best option for those suffering at the end of their lives.

Finally, Fiona Goodlee, editor in chief of the BMJ, rounds out the arguments by declaring that legalization of assisted dying is not a medical decision, but rather a societal question. She argues that the role of the physician is compatible with providing euthanasia or assisted suicide and if society wants it, they should get it.

Amid these scholarly endorsements of euthanasia come the claims of British physician Patrick Pullicino that the National Health Service (NHS) is effectively killing 130,000 patients every year when doctors place these patients on the Liverpool Care Protocol (LCP) and deny them nutrition and hydration.

The medical literature from the United States also shows an increasing acceptance of physician assisted suicide and euthanasia. The July 12, 2012, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) included an article by Dr. Lisa Soleymani Lehmann and Julian Prokopetz that suggested physician opposition to assisted dying was an unreasonable barrier to patients seeking lethal medications. They recommended that all patients who met the legal criteria for assisted suicide as outlined in the state laws of Oregon, Washington, and Montana should be able to obtain the drugs necessary for suicide without a physician’s prescription or approval.

Perhaps the most chilling example is the enthusiastic endorsement in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) for the book Death, Dying, and Organ Transplantation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life, by Drs. Franklin Miller and Robert Truog. This book seeks to do away with two core principles of medical care. The first is that a physician cannot intentionally cause the death of his patient. The second is that donors of vital organs for transplantation must be dead before the organs are harvested.

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FLORIDA

Pro: When he is near death, this man wants the choice to kill himself by Tom O’Hara  – jacksonville.com (8/21/12) – I would much prefer to spend a few weeks getting things organized and saying my goodbyes. Then I want to take control.

It’s my life.

It’s my body.

If I want to spare myself and those I love months of useless pain and sadness, then I should be allowed to kill myself without a lot of legal debate and secrecy.

And I’ll get the satisfaction of knowing that I’ve saved the taxpayers a nice piece of change.

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HAWAII

Join Juggie – My Life. My Death. My Choice. Compassion & Choices – Former State Representative Ernest “Juggie” Heen, cancer patient and aid-in-dying advocate. He believes every Hawai’i citizen with terminal illness should have the legal right to choose a dignified death

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Compassion & Choices – Spotlight: Hawaii -8/13/12) –  We have identified a core group of physicians willing to practice aid in dying and speak out for patient choice. Courageous, skilled and respected medical practitioners lead our growing Physician Advisory Council.

Our Hawaii Executive Council, composed of highly respected caregivers, community leaders and legal experts, will serve as educators and spokespeople for patient choice.

We will prepare a legislative contingency plan and organize constituent visits to educate lawmakers about current law and how patients suffer when their choices go unrecognized. We will also assess lawmakers’ views on end-of-life choice so we can move quickly to mobilize supporters.

In January, Compassion & Choices released a poll of Hawaii voters’ opinions. The results:

77% favor allowing those who are dying of a terminal disease the choice to request and receive medication from their physician to bring about a peaceful death.

90% agree the decision about aid in dying is a personal one between patient and doctor.

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LOUISIANA

Louisiana: Key Pro-Life Bulls on Abortion, Euthanasia Take Effect by Seven Ertelt, LifeNews.com (8/1/12) – Four key pro-life bills take effect today that protect vulnerable people at both the beginning and end of life. The Pain Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, the Hear the Heartbeat Bill, the Criminal Abortion Dismemberment Act, and the Additional Protections Against Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Act took effect at midnight.

“Louisiana is ranked as the top pro-life state in the nation, and I commend our Senators and Representatives, our Governor, and the great citizens of Louisiana for their support in enacting these new pro-life laws,” Clapper said.

Finally, the Additional Protections Against Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Act better protects the disabled and ill from euthanasia and assisted suicide.

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KANSAS

Man dies after losing fight for assisted suicide – KMBZ.com (8/22/12) – “I thought that if the court saw me as I am, utterly miserable with my life, powerless to do anything about it because of my disability, then the judges would accept my reasoning that I do not want to carry on and should be able to have a dignified death,” the former corporate manager from Wiltshire said in a statement issued by his lawyer.

But on Aug. 16, the court upheld the law barring Nicklinson from dying with a doctor’s help.

“It is not for the court to decide whether the law about assisted dying should be changed and, if so, what safeguards should be put in place,” Lord Justice Roger Toulson said in his ruling. “Under our system of government, these are matters for parliament to decide, representing society as a whole, after parliamentary scrutiny, and not for the court on the facts of an individual case or cases.”

A spokesman for British anti-euthanasia group Care Not Killing applauded the ruling, saying, “it confirms the simple truth that the current law exists to protect those without a voice: the disabled, terminally ill and elderly, who might otherwise feel pressured into ending their lives.”

For Nicklinson, the decision was devastating.

“I am saddened that the law wants to condemn me to a life of increasing indignity and misery,” he said in a statement.

Nicklinson planned to appeal the court ruling, but his health quickly deteriorated. He “died peacefully this morning of natural causes,” according to a tweet posted by his wife, Jane, and daughters Lauren and Beth.

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MAINE

Physician-assisted suicide– time to reconsider by Dr. Erik Steele, The Bangor Daily News/Health (8/16/12) – One night several years ago, my terminally ill patient David chose the time of his own death by shooting himself in the chest. I believe he picked that method because he knew I would be angry if he chose to end his life more peacefully by simply taking an overdose of the pills I prescribed him. I have been angry at myself ever since for having given him good reason to think so.

The upshot of that gunshot was that it’s echo has been banging around my head since it rang out, often when I am trying to fall asleep at night. It has led me to rethink what I had always thought about physician-assisted suicide: that the price to be paid for the liberty of some to choose it carefully and appropriately would be others who chose it prematurely and unnecessarily, a price too steep to be paid. Several years later, I think what I thought was wrong, and I figured I owed it to David to say so.

New data — evidence from actual experience delineated in careful medical studies — can be such an element leading to change. In the case of physician-assisted suicide it comes from the growing experience of states such as Oregon and Washington, where it is legal. Evidence from both states suggest that physician-assisted suicide is used less often than was feared, with fewer than 600 in Oregon over 15 years, and only 156 in Washington since it became legal there in 2009.

Both states have found that the liberty can be carefully overseen by the medical profession so patients are not using it for the wrong reasons (depression, lack of support, etc.), and that one in three patients who have their physician’s support for dying that way choose not to use it.

The data suggests much of what I and others feared would result from the legalizing of physician-assisted suicide does not happen when the medical profession works with the political profession to craft, implement and oversee a good law that makes a reasonable liberty available to an intelligent public. Go figure.

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MASSACHUSETTS

Why Assisted Suicide is the Right Choice, for Some by John M. Grohol, PsyD, Founder & Editor in Chief,  World of Psychology – Assisted suicide is a simple, reasonable and dignified choice that individuals at the end of their lives should be allowed greater access to. The only reason to withhold such access is the belief that government knows better than you what’s best for you at the end of your life.

I believe that few of us would agree that government knows what’s best for us in our personal health decisions. With all things being equal at the end of your life, would you rather gain a few weeks of life living in a hospital bed, heavily medicated, with tubes running from you, with machines helping you “live,” or would you rather die in a place and at a time of your own choosing?

Even if you choose, “hospital bed,” shouldn’t that choice be yours, and yours alone?

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“Death With Dignity Act” Ballot Initiative by Rabbi Liberman in Rabbi’s Thoughts (8/16/12)

Priest-physician brings unique perspective to suicide debate by Christopher S. Pineo, PilotCatholicNews.com (8/17/12) – “I think it is very clear, in that, indeed we have a profound responsibility to provide excellent care for those who are facing the end of life, and that to move on to assisted suicide represents a failure for individuals and for our larger society,” he said.

Father Sheehan said fear contributes strongly to attitudes that push people to choose to end their own lives.

“The major thing is that people are very frightened, and they are frightened about facing the end of life, their fear of being in pain or being a burden on others, or being alone when they die. So, as a consequence these fears and worries, maybe driven by the media or perhaps by the experience of someone in their family or a friend, lead them to think that assisted suicide would be a good option,” he said.

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Northampton woman, plagued with terminal illness, supports ‘Death with Dignity’ option on the Massachusetts ballot by Dan Ring, The Repubican (8/20/12) – Myra P. Berzoff said she doesn’t know if she would take life-ending medications, but said she would like the choice.

At 91, she needs oxygen virtually 100 percent of the time, or else she would suffocate. She said she was diagnosed with emphysema three years ago and lives with the fear she could die from breathlessness.

Berzoff said she is a strong supporter of a ballot question on Nov. 6 that if approved by voters would allow adults to self-administer lethal drugs after requesting a prescription.

“I think I should have the right if tomorrow I decide I want to do myself in,” she says bluntly. “I’m using up resources. I feel very strongly about that.”

James F. Driscoll, executive director of the Massachusetts Catholic Conference, the public policy arm for the Roman Catholic bishops in Massachusetts, said the church values life from conception to death. He said the church is a big supporter of hospice and palliative care. McDonnell also emphasizes hospice and palliative care in his upcoming column.

Driscoll said the ballot question would set a dangerous precedent. “The church is against this initiative and thinks it is a dangerous path to take a human life before natural death,” Driscoll said.

Taught by nuns at Catholic school, Myra Berzoff scoffs at the argument that the ballot question is dangerous because it advocates taking a human life before natural death. She said she should have the option offered by the ballot question.

“That’s absurd,” she said. “If you’re suffering, it’s your life. It isn’t the life of the Catholic church. It’s mine.”

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Beware Death with Dignity Bill – LowellSun – Opinion (8/21/12)

Opposing Euthanasia in pro-life (A call to Massachusetts activists!) by Thomas Peters – Live Action News – Opinion (8/21/12)

Majority of Massachusetts Voters Support Death with Dignity by Melissa Barber – Living with Dying: Death with Dignity National Center (8/22/12) – The poll question had the same wording as what will appear on the November ballot:

Question 2 would allow a physician licensed in Massachusetts to prescribe medication, at the request of a terminally ill patient meeting certain conditions, to end that person’s life. If the election was today, would you vote yes or no on Question 2?

Yes…………………………… 58%
No ………………………………….. 24%
Undecided……………………….. 18%

See also:  The major myths about Death With Dignity laws

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UK man who failed to overturn euthanasia law dies by Maria Cheng, boston.com (8/22/12) – Tony Nicklinson, paralyzed and unable to speak, found life so unbearable he wanted to die. On Wednesday, the 58-year-old Briton got his wish.

His family said he died of pneumonia at home.

In January, Nicklinson asked the High Court to declare that any doctor who killed him with his consent would not be charged with murder. Last week, the court rejected his request, a decision that Nicklinson said had left him ‘‘devastated and heartbroken.’’

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Briton who fought for assisted suicide is dead by John F. Burns, The New York Times-Europe (8/22/12) – A 58-year-old British man suffering from so-called locked-in syndrome died Wednesday, six days after a panel of High Court judges rejected his request for help in ending his life. His death is certain to galvanize the already contentious debate about assisted suicide in Britain
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Massachusetts Assisted Suicide Proposal Preys on Seniors by Steven Ertelt – LifeNews.com (8/22/12) – A diverse group of people is fighting the proposal on the November ballot in Massachusetts to legalize assisted suicide. Among them is Margaret Dore, an attorney who is a recognized expert on the subject.Dore points out in a brief column, that appears below, how assisted suicide preys on seniors and how assisted suicide, a practiced in other states, includes significant abuses.
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Tony Nicklinson, Man at Center of UK Euthanasia Case, Diesby Steven Ertelt – LifeNews.com (8/22/12) – Tony Nicklinson, 59 and paralyzed from the neck down after a stroke in 2005 and the man at the center of a controversial euthanasia case in England, has passed away. Nicklinson was arguing for permission that a doctor who performed voluntary euthanasia on him would have an effective defense when prosecuted for murder. However, lost his court quest to be legally euthanized and now he has died of pneumonia.“Everyone could understand and empathize with his anguish and pain.  But the request to be killed didn’t just involve him,” he said. “And as I mentioned in my last post on this very sad case, if death remained his goal, he was not “powerless” toward that end as he feared, having every right to refuse life-sustaining treatment if he became ill. That appears to be what happened.”
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Tony Nicklinson Dies After Losing Fight for Assisted Suicide by Katie Moisse – ABC Good Morning America (8/22/12) – A paralyzed man who fought to overturn Britain’s ban on assisted suicidedied today from pneumonia less than a week after losing his controversial court case.Tony Nicklinson had locked-in syndrome after suffering a stroke in 2005. Trapped inside a paralyzed body and forced to communicate by blinking his eyes, the 58-year-old man asked three of Britain’s High Court judges to grant him the right to end his “dull, miserable, demeaning, undignified and intolerable” life with a doctor-administered lethal injection.”I thought that if the court saw me as I am, utterly miserable with my life, powerless to do anything about it because of my disability, then the judges would accept my reasoning that I do not want to carry on and should be able to have a dignified death,” the former corporate manager from Wiltshire said in a statement issued by his lawyer.
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Jack Kervorkian comes to town by Tom Keane – boston.com (8/26/12) – The late Jack Kevorkian, a saint to some and a demon to others, was the controversial proponent of physician-assisted suicide for the dying and ill. This November, Kevorkian comes to the Commonwealth, or the spirit of the man at least, in the form of Question 2. The ballot measure, neutrally titled “Prescribing Medication to End Life,” would allow doctors to help the terminally ill kill themselves.

Massachusetts is thus somewhat of a test case: Is legalized suicide a trend?

Should we have state-sanctioned suicide? Libertarians argue that your body is your own, to do with as you wish. Some major religions disagree, but nothing in the proposed law requires the faithful to commit suicide. It simply permits it.

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Parishes oppose proposal on doctor-aided death by Tom Dalton – The Salem News (8/27/12) – The Catholic parishes of Salem are campaigning to defeat a question on the November ballot that would allow doctors to assist terminally ill patients who want to end their lives.
“The church is very much opposed to it,” said the Rev. Timothy Murphy, pastor of Immaculate Conception Church.
The so-called “death with dignity” ballot question began with an initiative petition filed with the state attorney general’s office by a group of citizens that included Dr. Paul Spiers of Danvers.
State Rep. John Keenan, whose mother died of lung cancer, said he supports the measure as a way to lessen suffering. Keenan, of Salem, said he believes anyone who has watched a parent or child die from a terminal illness would also support it.
Members of the local pro-life committee, however, are taking a strong stand against a question they say is misunderstood and open to abuse.
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Campaign Aims to Spur End-of-Life Conversations Within Familiesby Kay Lazar – The Boston Globe (8/29/12 ) – Compassion & Choices – “I knew what he wanted,” said his wife, Nancy. “I had had this discussion many times with him, but the kids hadn’t and they weren’t ready to let go.”

With death and dying, most Americans engage in a conspiracy of silence, surveys show, failing to discuss their final wishes until it is too late. A new Massachusetts-based coalition aims to change that.

Called The Conversation Project, the national campaign encourages open and honest discussions among families and friends about how they want to live life at the end, so that their wishes will be followed.

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Death with Dignity: Doctor-prescribed suicide for terminally ill may soon be a way to die in Massachusetts – AllVoices.com (8/31/12) – Living — and dying — according to one’s own desires and personal beliefs is possibly the greatest freedom a human being can have. But what happens when the autonomy and, potentially, the peace of mind of choosing one’s time and place of death conflicts with qualms about a physician’s role as a healer and, ultimately, the value of human life?

Massachusetts residents will contemplate those questions in November, when the Bay State will become the third in the nation to consider a ballot initiative that would allow terminally ill people to end their lives through the self-administration of medications prescribed for that purpose.

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MONTANA

Assisted Suicide: “Whose Choice?” – Montanans Against Assisted Suicide and for Living With Dignity (8/12/12) – Have you been solicited to engage in “aid-in-dying?”  Were you told that “aid-in-dying” is legal?  Did something about what you were told seem not quite right?

“Aid-in-dying” is a euphemism for assisted suicide and euthanasia.

“Aid-in-dying” is, regardless, not legal in Montana.  Baxter did not legalize the practice.  Moreover, a bill that would have legalized the practice was defeated in the last legislative session.

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Assisted suicide is not legal in Montana – Mass Against Assisted Suicide (8/31/12) – I am a Montana State Senator.  I disagree with your article, “Redefining Physicians’ Role in Assisted Dying,” claiming that assisted suicide is legal in Montana.  At the very least, Montana law is unclear.

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NEW YORK

At the end of life, talk helps bridge a racial divide by Joseph Sacco, MD (8/6/12) – The New York Times – Our findings, published on July 9 in The American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, upend the conventional view of preferences for care among blacks. Sixty-five percent of black patients who were given palliative care consultation elected DNR, and 32 percent chose hospice — rates significantly higher than those previously demonstrated.

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Richard Wesley: Ill doctor sheds light on who chooses physician-assisted suicide– The Inquisitor (8/12/12) – When Dr. Richard Wesley voted to approve Washington State’s Death With Dignity Act in 2009, he had no idea that just one month later he would be diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis — or Lou Gehrig’s Disease — just one month later.

Despite the prospect of living, and dying, with an incurable disease that eats muscles, yet leaves the mind intact, Dr. Wesley is at peace knowing there is a prescription of barbiturates waiting at the pharmacy should he choose to end his life on his own terms. (video)

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Dr. Kervorkian had it right about assisted suicide by John M. Crisp – Newsday.com (8/20/12) – My uncle got a lucky break last week — literally. He got up in the middle of the night and, enfeebled at 81 years of age, he fell, hitting his head on a desk and breaking his skull. Later the next night he died, having never regained consciousness.

Why am I calling this gruesome mishap lucky? Because a few months earlier he had been diagnosed with lung cancer, and a couple of days before he died he had gone into hospice care. He was facing several months of increasing discomfort, disability and undignified decline, and then real pain and finally a smothering death. With a misstep in the middle of the night, he managed to avoid all of that.

Barbara Wise wasn’t quite so “lucky.” She suffered a stroke recently and was bedridden in a Cleveland hospital, unable to move or speak. John Wise, her husband of 45 years, smuggled a pistol into her hospital room and fired a single round into her head. She died the next day. Even though Wise and his wife had agreed long ago that neither of them wished to live in a bedridden, disabled state, prosecutors have charged the 66-year-old Wise with aggravated murder.

(m0re)

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Tony Nicklinson, who lost “assisted-suicide” case, dies by Victoria Cavaliere – NY Daily News (8/22/12) – A paralyzed man who lost a landmark assisted suicide case in England died Wednesday from natural causes.

Tony Nicklinson died at his home in Melksham after suffering complications from pneumonia, his family said on Twitter. He was 58.

Nicklinson had described his life as “a living nightmare” since suffering a stroke in 2005 that left him with locked-in syndrome, a total paralysis of all the muscles.

The former corporate manager and rugby player was unable to speak or move, but his mind remained intact and he was not terminally ill.

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Overtreatment is taking a harmful toll by Tara Parker-Pope – NYTimes.com (8/27/12) – When it comes to medical care, many patients and doctors believe more is better.

But an epidemic of overtreatment — too many scans, too many blood tests, too many procedures — is costing the nation’s health care system at least $210 billion a year, according to the Institute of Medicine, and taking a human toll in pain, emotional suffering, severe complications and even death.

“Sometimes the test leads you down a path, a therapeutic cascade, where you start to tumble downstream to more and more testing, and more and more invasive testing, and possibly even treatment for things that should be left well enough alone.”

Some complained that when they switch doctors they are required to undergo duplicate blood work, scans or other tests that their previous doctor had only recently ordered. Others told of being caught in a unending maze of testing and specialists who seem to forget the patient’s original complaint. I heard from doctors and nurses, too — health professionals frustrated by a system that encourages these excesses.

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OHIO

Hospital shooting fuels euthanasia debate – news24.com (8/13/12) – The shooting leaves authorities in a dilemma some experts say will happen with greater frequency in coming years as the baby boom generation ages — what is the appropriate punishment when a relative kills a loved one to end their suffering?
More often than not, a husband who kills an ailing wife never goes to trial and lands a plea deal with a sentence that carries no more than a few years in prison, research has shown. In some instances, there are no charges.

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OREGON

Assisted suicide most often chosen by affluent white by Katie Hafner – bendbulletin.com (8/12/12) – Washington followed Oregon in allowing terminally ill patients to get a prescription for drugs that will hasten death. Critics of such laws feared that poor people would be pressured to kill themselves because they or their families could not afford end-of-life care. But the demographics of patients who have gotten the prescriptions are surprisingly different than expected, according to data collected by Oregon and Washington through 2011.

They are overwhelmingly white, well-educated and financially comfortable. And they are making the choice not because they are in pain but because they want to have the same control over their deaths that they have had over their lives.

While preparing advance medical directives and choosing hospice and palliative care over aggressive treatment have become mainstream options, physician-assisted dying remains taboo for many people. Voters in Massachusetts will consider a ballot initiative in November on a law nearly identical to those in the Pacific Northwest, but high-profile legalization efforts have failed in California, Hawaii and Maine.

Oregon put its Death With Dignity Act in place in 1997, and Washington’s law went into effect in 2009. Some officials worried that thousands of people would migrate to both states for the drugs.

“There was a lot of fear that the elderly would be lined up in their RVs at the Oregon border,” said Barbara Glidewell, an assistant professor at Oregon Health & Science University.

That has not happened, although the number of people who have taken advantage of the law has risen over time. In the first years, Oregon residents who died using drugs they received under the law accounted for one in 1,000 deaths. The number is now roughly one in 500 deaths. At least 596 Oregonians have died that way since 1997. In Washington, 157 such deaths have been reported, roughly one in 1,000.

In Oregon, the number of men and women who have died that way is roughly equal, and their median age is 71. Eighty-one percent have had cancer, and 7 percent ALS, which is also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The rest have had a variety of illnesses, including lung and heart disease. The statistics are similar in Washington.

There were fears of a “slippery slope” — that the law would gradually expand to include those with nonterminal illnesses or that it would permit physicians to take a more active role in the dying process itself. But those worries have not been borne out, experts say.

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BackyardChickens.com – What do you all think about Euthanasia? – opinions

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Oregon Death with Dignity – More Educated About Issues More You Understand About End of Life Care by Anthony Cirillo – about.com Assisted Living (8/20/12) –  The data show Death with Dignity is a rarely used option for a small number of terminally ill Oregonians. The report indicates the process was implemented, in every instance, under the strict guidelines written into Oregon law and the established medical standard of care that has evolved since implementation.

During the 13 months covered by the report, 114 qualified patients received a prescription under the provisions of the law. Approximately 62%, or 71 terminally ill individuals, died as a result of ingesting medication prescribed under the Oregon Death with Dignity Act. Sixty-two different physicians wrote prescriptions under the law. According to the Health Division’s report, in the 14 year history of implementation, 935 prescriptions have been written and 596 individuals have ingested medication and died using the standards spelled out in Oregon law.

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Assisted suicide in Oregon – Questions & Answers

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PENNSYLVANIA

British man’s death adds fuel to fire in assisted suicide debateby John F. Burns – post-gazette.com (8/23/12) – A 58-year-old British man suffering from so-called locked-in syndrome died Wednesday, six days after the nation’s High Court rejected his request for help in ending his life.

His death is certain to galvanize already-contentious debate about assisted suicide in Britain.

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SOUTH CAROLINA

Are our lives our own? The ethics of ‘elective death’ by Bill Thompson 8/5/12 – Given the choice, few would want to end their lives in nursing homes, hospices or in hospitals, however caring the professionals, but rather in their own home in the embrace of family and friends.

Yet many who are terminally ill and/or suffering excruciating pain that palliative care cannot balm spend their last days in clinical settings hooked to life support equipment they do not want. Others are compelled to go on living in ruined bodies or in advanced old age when they have no wish to do so, often beset with emotional or psychological pain that has become unbearable.

When all medical and counseling measures have been taken, and proven unsuccessful, should an individual have the right to end his or her own life? It is a debate with profound ethical, religious and human rights implications.

“Life should not be a sentence. The freedom to die in the manner of our own choosing is the ultimate civil liberty,” argues Mount Pleasant social historian Richard N. Cote, author of “In Search of Gentle Death.” “There is rising criticism that keeping dying people alive against their will is a violation of their civil rights.”

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TEXAS

We should reconsider assisted suicide laws by John Crisp San Angelo Standard Times (8/22/12) – My uncle got a lucky break last week — literally. He got up in the middle of the night and, enfeebled at 81 years of age, he fell, hitting his head on a desk and breaking his skull. Later the next night he died, having never regained consciousness.

Why am I calling this gruesome mishap lucky? Because a few months earlier he had been diagnosed with lung cancer, and a couple of days before he died he had gone into hospice care. He was facing several months of increasing discomfort, disability and undignified decline, and then real pain and finally a smothering death.

With a misstep in the middle of the night, he managed to avoid all of that.

Barbara Wise wasn’t quite so “lucky.” She suffered a stroke recently and was bedridden in a Cleveland hospital, unable to move or speak. John Wise, her husband of 45 years, smuggled a pistol into her hospital room and fired a single round into her head. She died the next day.

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VIRGINIA

Hospice: Celebrating the end of lifeby William C. Boinest and SR. Victoria Segura – Richmond Times-Dispatch (8/30/12) – No one likes to talk about the end of life. It seems more natural to celebrate its beginning. But, death is a part of life, and when it comes, most of us want to be at home, at peace, surrounded by our loved ones.

For some, that’s not possible. For some, a higher level of medical care is needed. Many families think they can handle caregiving duties at home, but most find they are overwhelmed and unable to spend precious, focused time with their loved one.

Most communities the size of Richmond have an answer to this problem, a place where patients can receive a higher level of medical care in a home-like environment, and families can be present for their loved ones, unencumbered by caregiving duties.

Richmond does not. Surprisingly, freestanding palliative and hospice care is not available within a 55-mile radius of our city.

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WASHINGTON

Death with Dignity Act ensures control, not pain – The Seattle Times – Letters (8/18/12)

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Who chooses assisted suicide? Data reveal surprising answersby Katie Harner in The Seattle Times (8/12/12) – Dr. Richard Wesley has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the incurable disease that lays waste to muscles while leaving the mind intact. He lives with the knowledge that an untimely death is chasing him down, but takes solace in knowing that he can decide exactly when, where and how he will die.

Under Washington state’s Death With Dignity Act, his physician has given him a prescription for a lethal dose of barbiturates. He would prefer to die naturally, but if dying becomes protracted and difficult, he plans to take the drugs and die peacefully within minutes.

“It’s like the definition of pornography,” Wesley, 67, said at his home here in Seattle, with Mount Rainier in the distance. “I’ll know it’s time to go when I see it.”

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Physician-assisted suicide: A chance for dignity in death by John Culver– The Gonzaga Online Bulletin (8/22/12) – In 1997, Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act came into effect, hearkening in a new era of end of life care in the United States. The bill was created in response to the suffering of individuals experiencing end-stage terminal illnesses in which physical deterioration and pain coupled to bring about an unacceptably low quality of life. The law signaled a growing recognition that palliative care could not always prevent dying individuals from reaching a state of existence that they found degrading and unacceptable. Rather than suffer for days, weeks or months during an inevitable decline toward death, terminally ill patients could request that their physician prescribe them a lethal dose of barbiturates. They would bring about a merciful, dignified death.

Since its inception, the law has allowed more than 600 terminally ill Oregonians to die on their own terms, rather than suffer through the natural progression of their diseases. The law’s utility extends far beyond its potential to directly alleviate physical suffering; it provides tremendous mental comfort to terminally ill Oregonians.

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WISCONSIN

Seeing death in a new light by Bruce Wilson, The Journal Sentinel (8/13/12) – Death has become a taboo subject, but it hasn’t always been so. It seems to be feared mostly because as a society we have become so unfamiliar with death. Medical science has evolved very rapidly, and over the past 50 years we have become so good at treating illnesses that we somehow have come to view death as an option. Before heart surgery and angioplasty and antibiotics and chemotherapy, people often died when they got sick.

In earlier agrarian times, Grandpa dropped over of a heart attack while harvesting the corn or milking the cows. Doctors couldn’t get to the patients and had little to offer when they did. The family called the undertaker, who helped get Grandpa into his dark suit and they laid him out on the dining room table. Friends and family were summoned, everyone drank some whiskey and they buried him. Children and adults alike saw this cycle of life over and over. There was sadness, but it was familiar, and a fact of life.

In more modern times, Grandpa is in the ICU at the hospital. Children are frequently not allowed to visit.

Physicians have spent years learning how to fight off almost any condition, and have become unfamiliar with death themselves, so much so that internally they may have a sense of failure when death finally comes, often after a long siege of warfare against nature.

In addition, there has been almost no training for doctors in how to speak about death or prepare patients and families for this when the picture becomes clear.

This is almost a uniquely American phenomenon. The reason is simple: Most other countries do not have enough money to spend on “health care” at the end of life, when many of the measures that we view as routine are often futile.

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INTERNATIONAL

(News updates from Australia, Canada, Fiji, Germany, India, Japan, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, Scotland, Switzerland, United Kingdom)

AUSTRALIA

Euthanasia: tackling the ‘wicked’ policy problem by Scott Prasser – onlineopinion.com.au (8/7/12) – There are three basic requirements for dealing with ‘wicked’ policy problems like euthanasia.

First, there needs to be time to engage the public in open, depoliticised, iterative discussion of the many dimensions of the problem. This is an absolute necessity for complex social issues with a strong moral dimension like euthanasia, in order to make different perspectives understood and create a shared understanding of the issue to address.

Second, there needs to be reliable evidence and data so as to inform the debate and avoid distortion of the facts, but this alone it is not sufficient when conflicting values and perspectives are at stake. Euthanasia is not an issue where ‘evidence’ based policy development alone can resolve the matter, but we certainly need to clarify the ‘evidence.’

Third, it is essential to have appropriate mechanisms (more than one) for public engagement in informed debate, to explore the range of arguments and to encourage the consideration of wider social implications if an agreed policy solution for the common good is to emerge.

Engaging the public in this kind of policy process would be a welcome new feature in the Australian political process.

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Mother wins six-year fight for right to let brain-dead son die by Jordanna Schriever, The Herald Sun (8/10/12) – Mrs Dunn will meet doctors on August 22 to seek a decision that he no longer be fed.

Mr Leigep, 37, has been unresponsive and in a vegetative state since March 2006 after a car crash in Adelaide’s north.

Ms Dunn would prefer her son die in a more humane way and be euthanased with drugs. She said the laws must be changed to allow families in her position to have access to euthanasia.

“I’m starving my son to death, and I’ve got no other choice but to leave him as he is,” she said.

“If I starved my dog, I would be locked up. But I’m allowed to starve my son.

“I can’t let him suffer any more. I wish there was another choice. I’m so devastated. It’s not just about euthanasia, we want him to die with respect … families have got to have that right.”

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Philip Nitschke says Exit International has seen a surge in demand for help to die peacefully by Steve Rice, heraldsun.com.au (8/16/12) – Dr Nitschke says the $690 kit allows for a peaceful death.

HIs voluntary euthanasia group, Exit International, has sold 50 of the kits and ordered another 100 – most of which have already been pre-ordered – at a cost of about $345.

He said there had been a surge in demand from people wanting the gas.

“If people really want an anonymous death, that is one that will never be detected, (this) is really your only option,” he said.

“It’s the only undetectable method of death.

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Euthanasia Campaigner Philip Nitschke Meets His Match in Debate by Paul Russell, a leading campaigner against euthanasia  (8/17/12) – Here’s the text of my talk:

Unless you’re posing a serious and present threat to my life, I can’t kill you. That’s a good thing. We all enjoy this protection in law equally, every one of us.
But, now we’re saying that it’s okay for someone else to kill you.
That is the fundamental issue: we will be making an exception to the Criminal Code that changes the laws on homicide. That is serious stuff.
We’d be creating a right for someone else to kill us or, to put it another way, a right to be killed.
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St Vincent offers peace to dying by Hamish Broome (8/20/12) – The team at St Vincent’s Hospital palliative care unit have been recognised as one of the best in the country, with a recent report ranking their services as second in NSW and fifth in Australia.

As part of a national program to benchmark patient outcomes, St Vincent’s unit was found to provide exceptional care in clinical outcomes and symptoms relief.

“Dying is one of the most critical things that happens to us,” said clinical nurse specialist Alan Hickey, who’s spent more than a decade in palliative care.

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Only person ever convicted in Qld for assisting suicide, Merin Nielsen, released from jail  – Herald Sun (8/20/12) – Merin Nielsen, 50, was freed last week after serving six months of a three-year jail sentence for assisting the suicide of an elderly man in 2009.

Euthanasia campaigner Philip Nitschke on Monday said he’d spoken to Mr Nielsen, who was utterly relieved to be out of jail and hoped the laws around euthanasia would change.

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Euthanasia decision – 4BC.com.au (broadcast) (8/23/12) – South Australian mother, Joanne Dunn, yesterday made the heartbreaking decision to ask doctors to stop feeding her 37-year-old son, Mark, who has been in a vegetative state since 2006 after a car crash.

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Australian euthanasia advocate wants Fiji death clinic– Google News (8/23/12) – Prominent Australian right-to-die campaigner Philip Nitschke said Friday he wants to set up an assisted suicide clinic in Fiji, but the government in Suva downplayed the idea.

Nitschke, a doctor who has campaigned on euthanasia issues for more than a decade, wants it to operate like the Dignitas centre in Switzerland, where 144 people ended their lives in 2011, virtually all of them foreigners.

Nitschke, head of Exit International, told the Sydney Morning Herald it would make it easier for people from the Asia-Pacific who wanted to end their lives to do so, rather than having to travel to Europe.

“Given the logistical problems faced by those in the Asia-Pacific travelling to Europe when seriously ill, Exit would suggest that a mirror clinic is well warranted in this region of the world,” he said.

He said he had written to Fiji’s attorney-general who had asked for more details, and hopes his organisation can go to the Pacific nation to discuss the idea.

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Fiji eyes proposal for assisted suicide by Julia Medew – The Syndey Morning Herald (8/24/12) – A 58-year-old British man suffering from so-called locked-in syndrome died Wednesday, six days after the nation’s High Court rejected his request for help in ending his life.

His death is certain to galvanize already-contentious debate about assisted suicide in Britain.

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Nitschke’s death clinic on agenda for Fiji

by Julia Medew The Canberra Times (8/24/12) – THE Fijian government is considering a proposal to open an assisted-suicide clinic where seriously ill Australians and others could go to die.

The Australian euthanasia advocate Dr Philip Nitschke has proposed a ”hastened death service” in Nandi which would operate like the Dignitas clinic in Switzerland, where about 1000 foreigners have died since 1998.

While a handful of European countries and two US states have legalised euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, the Dignitas clinic is the only one in the world that allows foreigners to use its service.

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Fiji says No to suicide clinic – BioEdge.org (8/24/12) – Australian euthanasia activist Dr Philip Nitschke seems to have jumped the gun by telling the media that the South Pacific island of Fiji was considering his plans for establishing a suicide clinic in the city of Nadi.

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Tony Nicklinson: Can law change on assisted dying and protect vulnerable? by Isra Black – International Business Times (8/24/12) – In this post, I attempt to clarify what the vulnerability objection is, that is, what concerns it raises against the legalisation of assisted dying, and who the ‘vulnerable’ are. This post also presents an overview of the safeguards designed to ensure that assisted dying is implemented without diluting the protections afforded to certain members of society. It ends by challenging the basis for assisted dying chosen by campaigners for a change in the law.

A detailed study of the safeguards present in the laws and practices of jurisdictions where assisted dying is lawful can be found in the briefing paper Professor Penney Lewis and I wrote for Demos and the Commission on Assisted Dying.

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Australians must have death with dignity – Herald Sun (8/28/12) – A Herald Sun investigation has found thousands of terminally ill people are unable to make their lives easier because of unduly restrictive regulations.

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CANADA

Suggestions for slipping a mortal coil: The important questions make dying livableby Gordon Sinclair Jr. – winnepegfreepress.com (8/4/12) – “But nobody had actually gone to dying patients and asked them what dignity was about,” Chochinov recalled. “What it meant to them.”

So he began asking palliative care patients in Winnipeg the dignity questions.

What Chochinov discovered was dignity for those who needed it most had more to do with emotional well-being, than physical requirements.

He found people lost their sense of dignity when they felt their life had lost meaning and purpose in its final stages.

Or, as Chochinov told me: “We looked at pain, we looked at physical symptoms, spiritual issues, psychological issues. The single most important predictor of people’s dignity was, in fact, how people perceived they were seen. How people saw themselves to be appreciated or seen by others.”

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DWD newsletter accuses the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition of lying by Alex Schadenberg, LifeSiteNews.com (8/6/12) – In the June 2012 edition of the Dying with Dignity newsletter (p.10), Wanda Morris, the executive director of Dying with Dignity states that EPC bases its arguments on Lies, Damn Lies and fear mongering.

Morris ought to look in the mirror when she accuses EPC of lying or fear mongering.

I knew that I was doing well in the debate when Morris stated that I lacked compassion because I opposed euthanasia and assisted suicide in all circumstances. Low blow Wanda, too bad it proved to the audience that you were getting desperate.

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Ottawa appeals B.C. assisted suicide ruling by Paul Tuns, TheInterim.com (8/7/12) – Waiting until the second-last business day to file, Canada’s federal government appealed the June 15 decision of B.C. Supreme Court Justice Lynn Smith overturning Canada’s ban on euthanasia and assisted suicide. Smith claimed that Canada’s Criminal Code prohibiting euthanasia and assisted suicide violated the Charter rights of those seeking assistance killing themselves and those who help them carry out their lethal wishes. The justice also argued the Criminal Code provisions violated disabled persons Section 7 rights of life, liberty, and security of the person.

On July 13, the Friday before the July 16 deadline to appeal Smith’s decision, federal Justice Minister Rob Nicholson announced the Conservative government sought to stay the ruling which urges Parliament to change the law to allow euthanasia and assisted suicide within the next 12 months and gives an immediate exemption to Gloria Taylor, an ALS sufferer who is challenging the assisted suicide law.

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‘One-sided and misleading’: Anti-euthanasia leader slams upcoming Canadian ‘expert panel’ event by Peter Baklinski – LifeSiteNews.com (8/7/12) – A pro-euthanasia group has teamed up with an atheist group to present what they call an “expert panel” to inform Canadians about recent legal developments in the country regarding medically assisted suicide.

Meanwhile, the country’s top advocate for the right-to-life of the elderly has slammed the expert panel event, calling it “one-sided and misleading”.

“Canada does not need anybody promoting laws that allow one person to kill another person, whether they are terminally ill or not,” said Alex Schadenberg, director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, to LifeSiteNews.

The UK Care Not Killing Alliance is honoured to host this first European symposium, which builds on several successful meetings in North America organised by the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition.

First European Symposium on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide

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Canadian attitudes skewed in favor of physician-assisted suicide by Michael Swan, The Catholic Register (8/9/12) – Canadians and Britons are more open to physician-assisted suicide than Americans, a recent poll by Angus Reid Public Opinion has found.

Eighty per cent of Canadians and 77 per cent of the English said that doctors should be allowed to assist terminally ill, fully informed and competent patients to kill themselves. But only 56 per cent of Americans agreed.

The poll found 10 per cent of Canadians and nine per cent of Britons firmly opposed to physician-assisted suicide no matter who asks for it. Nearly one third — 29 per cent — of Americans said it should never be allowed. On the flip side, three-quarters of Canadians and Britons said physician-assisted suicide should always be allowed under specific circumstances, whereas only half of Americans thought so.

“So far as the UK is concerned, in terms of opinion surveys this doesn’t surprise me,” he said. “What we’re seeing here to a degree is an instinctive, compassionate response from a society that prizes individual autonomy very highly.”

The Angus-Reid survey found 86 per cent of Canadians, 84 per cent of Britons and 69 per cent of Americans agree with the statement that “Legalizing doctor-assisted suicide would give people who are suffering an opportunity to ease their pain.”

People who believe laws against assisted suicide protect the vulnerable from social, economic and medical pressure to commit suicide face a major education challenge, said Wookey.

“It means there’s a very, very clear job for the Church to do, particularly in secular society,” he said.

British bishops have teamed up with disability rights organizations and palliative care professionals to form an alliance called Care Not Killing — a purely secular platform to engage the public policy debate.

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Gloria Taylor regains right to die in peace  by Cathryn Wellner (8/13/12) – Unless the federal government intervenes yet again, Gloria Taylor can decide in peace when her life with ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or Lou Gehrig’s disease) has become unbearable. At that point she can ask a physician to ease her death. British Columbia’s highest court has granted Taylor a personal exemption.

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Canadian Judge upholds decision giving woman “right” to die by euthanasia or assisted suicide by Dave Andrusko, National Right to Life News Today (8/10/12) – The Euthanasia Prevention Coalition (EPC) said today that it is troubled by the decision of  the British Columbia court not to stay the constitutional exemption granted to Gloria Taylor to die by euthanasia or assisted suicide. Alex Schadenberg, executive director, said EPC urges the Government to appeal the court order issued by Justice Jo-Ann Prowse.

“EPC is concerned that this court order may prompt other people with similar conditions to apply for a constitutional exemption to die by euthanasia before the Supreme Court and Parliament have ruled on the matter,” he said.

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New lease on life for assisted suicide debate– Sun News (8/11/12) – An appeals court ruling Friday that would let Gloria Taylor get help from a doctor to commit suicide doesn’t pass muster with the federal justice minister.

The B.C. woman is suffering from Lou Gehrig’s disease, has lost the ability to walk and is confined to a power chair.

“We are disappointed with this decision and are currently reviewing it,” said Julie DiMambro, a spokeswoman for Justice Minister Rob Nicholson.

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Ill Doctor Puts Spotlight on Euthanasia by Marcel Simmer, Akgulian.com (8/13/12) – Dr. Richard Wesley suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis an incurable disease that ruins the body’s muscles while allowing the mind to remain intact. However, he know that he can make the decision when, where and by what form he can die.

He lives in Washington, which has the Death With Dignity Act and his physician has prescribed for him a dose of barbiturates that is lethal. Wesley would prefer if he could die naturally, but because of his condition, it could become both difficult and protracted. His plan is to take the drugs and within minutes, die peacefully.

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Assisted suicide ruling right move by Charlie Hodge, kelownacapnews.com (8/17/12) – Until one has truly faced death in the face, it is hard to judge, or even begin to comprehend, how complex such a decision is.

Until one has truly come to grips with a debilitating, cruel, lingering, fatal illness, it really is impossible to comprehend the emotions and desires of someone in such a situation.

With death, theory is easy. Grasping it by the throat and actually dealing with it is a whole other ball game.

When one truly comprehends that their life form (as we know it) is dwindling due to a cruel terminal illness, all the theory goes out the window.

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Right-to-Die debate rages on – The Oxbow Herald (8/24/12) – This debate is contentious on both sides. People in support of assisted suicide argue the laws must be changed to allow terminally ill patients to die with dignity. When illness makes it impossible to support any quality of life, and the inevitable end is a slow and painful death, people should have the right to choose when to end their lives.

Opponents argue assisted suicide is wrong.

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Fighting for the right to die by Pam Frampton – The Weekend Telegram (8/25/12) – In Canada, assisted suicide is still illegal, but gains are being made in the fight by those who argue we should have that right.

In British Columbia in June, that province’s Supreme Court declared invalid a section of the Criminal Code that prohibits physician-assisted suicide.

That doesn’t mean the service is immediately available in B.C., but as The Globe and Mail’s Sunny Dhillon reported on June 15, according to Queen’s University research fellow and lawyer Ricardo Smalling, “if the government does not do something about (the court ruling), or if the B.C. Court of Appeal or the Supreme Court of Canada does not grant an injunction to stay the implementation of the decision, then assisted suicide will automatically become legal.”

The article also noted that a panel of experts of the Royal Society of Canada that studied end-of-life decision-making said “in a report released last year, that informed Canadians should have the right to choose death within a regulated system, even if they have not been diagnosed with a terminal illness.”

On March 22 in Quebec, a Select Committee on Dying with Dignity released a report which found similarly, recommending, among other things, “that relevant legislation be amended to recognize medical aid in dying as appropriate end-of-life care if the request made by the person meets (certain criteria) as assessed by the physician. …”

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Physician-assisted suicide poisons the mission of medicine by J. Donald Boudreau – The Globe and Mail (8/28/12) – Nothing would prevent society from mandating responsibilities to a new profession; I have called it euthanatrics.

Its practitioners – euthanologists – could ensure that society-sanctioned suicides are carried out expertly, with transparency and accountability. It would provide a mechanism to meet new legislative demands while protecting the medical profession so that it can continue to fulfill its ancient mandate of healing.

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Euthanasia discussion event will be one-sided, opponent says by Jessica Smith– MetroNews.ca (8/29/12) – The head of a group opposed to euthanasia says an upcoming panel discussion on “medically assisted death” in Ottawa won’t reflect the views of people opposed to the idea.

Executive Director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition Alex Schadenberg said he was invited to the panel discussion, but will be out of the county and the organizers did not find someone to fill his anti-decriminalization position.

Two Eastern Ontario professors and a Quebec politician will be speaking in Ottawa about legalizing euthanasia in a panel dubbed “Medically Assisted Death Coming to Canada: How, Why, When??”

“It’s a one-sided event,” Schadenberg said. “I would say this is not really a panel of information it’s a pro-euthanasia event promoting the legalization.”

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Dying with Dignity chapter formed on Salt Spring by Elizabeth Nolan -GulfIslandsDriftwood.com (8/29/12) – Salt Springers concerned about having the same ability to make personal choices while dying as they enjoy in everyday life have created the first local chapter of an organization dedicated to the right to die.

The group’s aim is to change Canadian law to allow people in palliative care to end their lives, with a doctor’s assistance, at the time of their own choosing. The issue has been likened to the debate on abortion: although the ethical question can be thorny,  advocates aren’t trying to make a universal case.

One of the participants at the meeting said his interest in dying with dignity began many years ago, when someone he knew of tried to end his own life before his debilitating disease did.

“But he did it with a shotgun and he didn’t do it right. It was terrible for the family,” he said.

Starvation has been suggested as an easy and mostly painless method: a person in care can simply refuse to take in any more food or water. But two other participants at the meeting recalled how their mother had done that very thing, and took 10 days to pass away.

Hoarding medication is also not advised, as overdoses often lead to brain damage and other lost functions, but may not be enough to end a life.

A Forum Research survey conducted in December 2011 found that 67 per cent of Canadian polled favoured legalizing doctor-assisted death for terminally ill patients. Hogan believes it’s now time for Canadians to make their beliefs known to ease the way toward legal changes. Joining groups such as Dying with Dignity and writing letters to political representatives will be key.

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Death without dignity by Barb Ritchie – Calgary Herald (8/29/12) – I thank God that she has reached the point of oblivion now, so she has some measure of peace in her life. Those who oppose the right-to-die legislation should be sitting on this bed next to me.

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FIJI

Legalise enthanasia– The Fiji Times Online (8/15/12) – CALLS have been made to legalise euthanasia in Fiji to be included in the next constitution.

Doctor Etika Vuniyabola highlighted this as part of his submissions to the Constitution Commission.

Euthanasia refers to the practice of intentionally ending a life in order to relieve pain and suffering.

In his submission, Dr Vuniyabola proposed that this subject be earnestly considered and accepted for the sake of the people in need of its role as a solution to their silent sufferings and helplessness when mental and physical incapacitation had no available cure and solution.

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State rejects death clinic by Nasik Swami – The Fiji Times (8/25/12) – A PROPOSAL sent to the government to open an euthanasia clinic in the country by Australian euthanasia advocate Dr Philip Nitschke has been rejected.

Confirming this to The Fiji Times, Ministry for Information permanent secretary Sharon Smith-Johns said the Attorney-General’s Chambers received a submission from Dr Nitschke in August last year.

“As with all submissions received by the chambers, details of the proposals were requested but there is no plan to establish such a facility,” Ms Smith-Johns said.

However, The Sydney Morning Herald reported that Dr Nitschke had proposed a “hastened death service” in Nadi which would operate like the Dignitas clinic in Switzerland, where about 1000 foreigners have died since 1998.

Dr Nitschke is the owner of Exit International, a leading end-of-life choices (voluntary euthanasia/ assisted suicide) information and advocacy organisation.

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Fiji eyes proposal for assisted suicide by Richard Dawkins, Foundation for Reason and Science (8/26/12) – Australian euthanasia advocate Dr Philip Nitschke has proposed a “hastened death service” in Nadi which would operate like the Dignitas clinic in Switzerland, where about 1000 foreigners have died since 1998.

While a handful of European countries and two US states have legalised euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, the Dignitas clinic is the only one in the world that allows foreigners to use its service.

In a proposal sent to Fiji’s Attorney-General, Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum last year, Dr Nitschke said the developing country could generate “considerable income” from a similar clinic with demand expected to come from people in Australia, New Zealand, Asia and India who do not have access to physician-assisted suicide.

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Church welcomes rejection of euthanasia clinic in FIJI– Radio Australia (8/27/12) – One man that’s welcomed the news is Reverend Tevita Banivanua, the deputy general secretary of Fiji’s Methodist Church, who’s speaking to correspondent Bruce Hill

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GERMANY

Assisted suicide law split government – TheLocal.de (8/1/12) – A row has blown up within the government about possible changes to German assisted suicide laws, after the justice minister said she wanted to enable not just relatives but also doctors and friends to help people to die.

All sides say commercial assisted suicide should be banned, as set out in the government’s coalition agreement – but disagreement has arisen over where the line should be drawn.

Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger wants to restrict the ban to organisations with commercial interests – leaving those who offer profit-free suicide advice to terminally ill people free to do so without fear of prosecution.

The Neue Osnabrücker Zeitung newspaper reported on Tuesday that Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger had drafted a law which would lift the threat of prosecution friends and long-term housemates, as well as doctors and carers – if during treatment “a close personal relationship”.

Health spokesman for Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union, Jens Spahn told the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung newspaper on Wednesday, it was not acceptable that commercial operations should be threatened with up to three years in jail, while relatives and friends would excepted.

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Central Council of Muslims criticizes draft law on euthanasia – Euro-Islan.info (8/3/12) – The Central Council of Muslims has issued a press release relatively to a new draft law on euthanasia. The draft law, proposed by Minister of Justice Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger (FDP), would legalize private euthanasia also when disposed by close relatives, allowing them to do so without legal consequences. The Council expressed the message that Muslims in Germany should not be abiding by this law. The medical doctor Dr. Houaida Taraji said that “Life is worth to be protected at any stage and no side doors should be opened for murder”.

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Half of Germans approve of euthanasia businesses – TheLocal.de (8/6/12) – Nearly half of Germans are in favour of legalising euthanasia businesses, a recent survey revealed. The German parliament is still divided over proposed changes to assisted suicide laws.

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Germany seeks to clarify euthanasia laws – DW-World.de  (8/8/12) – Many in Germany are unhappy with current euthanasia legislation, according to a study conducted by pollsters Emnid. The poll found that almost 50 percent of Germans say they want professionals to be able to help people who wish to die.

But that’s not what Berlin wants. The Justice Ministry has warned in a paper of a scenario where professional companies would be permitted to offer assistance in “a quick and efficient form of suicide.” Means in which companies could do this would be offering medication or a room for the suicide to take place. Under a planned bill though, this though would be punished by a fine or a prison sentence.

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INDIA

Court says woman’s life cannot be ended– UPI.com – India’s Supreme Court Monday declined a plea to end the life of a woman in a “vegetative state” for 37 years after a sexual assault.

The plea by activist Pinki Virani sought to stop the feeding of Aruna Shanbaug, a former nurse at Mumbai’s KEM Hospital and a victim of a sexual attack by a hospital janitor.

The petition said the victim can no longer see or speak properly and keeping her alive in this “persistent vegetative state” violates her right to life with dignity, The Times of India reported.

The case of Shanbaug, 60, has become a huge controversy with opinions widely divided.

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JAPAN

Death with Dignity bills heading toward Diet by Natsuko Fukue – The Japan Times Online (8/25/12) – “We’ve been holding discussions for seven years already. We shouldn’t rush, but I think it’s time to get our thoughts into shape,” the group’s chairman, Teruhiko Mashiko of the Democratic Party of Japan, told The Japan Times. “It’ll be great if the public starts discussing the issue as we submit the bills.”

The group drafted two versions and plans to let Diet members vote based on their own judgement. One version stipulates that doctors can’t start life-prolonging treatment on patients in a terminal stage, defined as “a condition in which patients have no possibility of recovery even with appropriate medical care,” and the other states that cancellation of such treatment would also be allowed.

Under both bills, more than two doctors would have to decide whether a patient is in a terminal stage and they would not be “held liable under the criminal, civil and administrative codes.”

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THE NETHERLANDS

Dutch would have stopped treating Prince Friso– Radio Netherlands Worldwide (8/3/12) – An influential Dutch ethicist has said that if Queen Beatrix’s son, Prince Johan Friso, had been hospitalised in the Netherlands after his ski accident, doctors would have already stopped his treatment.

Heleen Dupuis, who is a member of the Dutch Upper House for the ruling Liberal Party (VVD), said, “it’s questionable whether the prince will ever have a normal life again. I understand that the chances are extremely small.” According to the ethicist, “had the prince been sent to a Dutch hospital, doctors would have probably turned off the life support system because there is such a slim possibility that he will ever recover.”

Prince Friso suffered severe brain damage after he was trapped in an avalanche, while skiing in Austria in February. He is in a coma at Wellington Hospital in London. Doctors say the chances he will recover are minimal.

There’s a growing debate in the Netherlands about how far doctors should go in treating patients. Health care is becoming unaffordable for two reasons. On the one hand, people are ageing and need more medical care, and on the other extremely expensive drugs are being developed for very rare diseases that used to be fatal. The Dutch are asking whether society should pay 50,000 euros to extend a cancer patient’s life by six months. The discussion is likely to play a role in the political campaigns for the general elections on September 12.

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Controversy over assisted suicide in The Netherlands by Wim Jansen, Radio Netherlands Worldwide (8/15/12) – A special website has been launched in the Netherlands for people who assist family or friends to commit suicide and want to tell their stories anonymously, or simply ask questions. Assisted suicide carried out by lay people is currently punishable by law.

In the Netherlands, only doctors can carry out assisted suicides, and they can do so only if they follow strict protocols. According to Right-to-Die-Netherlands (NVVE), physicians frequently refuse requests for assisted suicide, leaving patients unable to carry out their wishes in a humane way. One case recently made headlines: a man who helped his 99-year-old mother to die by giving her the lethal medication she requested. The Ministry of Justice is considering bringing charges against the man.

The NVVE says people are often unwilling to help their friends and loved ones because they fear prosecution. So they’re left witnessing their loved ones dying or committing suicide and have to live with those memories. The organisation hopes that the anonymous testimonies will provoke discussion in the Netherlands and ultimately to the scrapping of the law against lay people helping in cases of assisted suicide.

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Doctors and chemists agree joint euthanasia guidelines  – DutchNews.nl (8/28/12) – Doctors and dispensing chemists have agreed a joint guideline on euthanasia, doctors’ federation KNMG and dispensing chemists’ organisation KNMP said on Tuesday.

The new guidelines will replace those drawn up five years ago by dispensing chemists and underline the cooperation between the two sets of medical professionals on the subject.

‘The guidelines not only contain technical information about, for instance, the amount of a drug to be administered, but also explain for the first time why a certain method has been chosen,’ a KNMG spokesman told website nu.nl.

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Euthanasia guides adopted in Netherlands– UPI.com (8/29/12) – An agreement on joint guidelines on euthanasia was reached between the associations representing doctors and pharmacists in the Netherlands, officials said.

The new guidelines, agreed to Tuesday, replace those developed five years ago by the pharmacists, DutchNews.nl reported.

Euthanasia is legal in the Netherlands under strict conditions, such as a patient “suffering unbearably” and the attending doctor must be convinced the patient is making an informed choice. A second opinion also is required.

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NEW ZEALAND

The peace of assisted dying by Sean Davidson – peoplemagazine.co.za (8/3/12) – If your loved one was dying a long, painful death, would you wish there was some other way out? Soon there might be.

Davison founded an organisation called DignitySA which seeks to legalise assisted dying of the terminally ill under precisely defined circumstances. DignitySA proposes a legal procedure in which those wanting to be euthanised will apply to an independent panel that would look at each case individually.

“It will be a kind, compassionate process with a panel that includes doctors, legal advisers and counsellors,” Davison explained.Opponents of assisted dying suggest that should a system be introduced in which death can be legalised, then that system would be open to abuse. The other common reason given for not legalising euthansia would be the appeal to the ‘sanctity of life’, in which opponents claim that life itself is too precious to be ended, under any circumstances.

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Hospice organising public meeting on euthanasia by Lindsay Shelton – Wellington.Scoop.co.nz (8/6/12) – Hospice New Zealand is pleased to announce a public meeting on euthanasia to be held in Wellington on Thursday, August 16, titled “Euthanasia, an ethical and legal crossroad”.

“Dying is a fact of life and should be discussed openly and often,” says Hospice New Zealand CEO, Mary Schumacher. “We have organized this public meeting to enable discussion on euthanasia outside of any individual case. It’s a subject that needs more understanding in many parts of the world and New Zealand is no different. We want to provoke discussion among New Zealanders and we hope the public meeting will generate questions that will allow people to form their own opinions.”

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Australian & NZ Society of Palliative Medicine on Euthanasia– Scoop.co.nz (8/6/12) – “We should focus on excellence of hospice and palliative care not euthanasia”

The Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine Inc., (ANZSPM), believes that the practice of euthanasia and assisted suicide are outside the discipline of Palliative Medicine. The Society endorses the New Zealand Medical Association’s Position Statement on Euthanasia, and similarly the World Medial Association’s which state that euthanasia and doctor-assisted suicide are unethical. This position is not dependent on euthanasia and doctor-assisted suicide remaining unlawful. Even if they were to become legal, or decriminalised, the NZMA would continue to regard them as unethical.

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Dangers of euthanasia spelt out by John Gibb, Otago Daily Times (8/15/12) – Many older people could be subjected to subtle pressures to end their lives prematurely if voluntary euthanasia was made lawful in this country, Baroness Prof Ilora Finlay warned in Dunedin yesterday.

Prof Finlay, a Welsh palliative care specialist, said legalising medically assisted euthanasia and assisted suicide was likely to have significant unintended consequences.

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Maggie Barry: Euthanasia not the answer by Issac Davison, nzherald.co.nz (8/16/12) – National Party MP Maggie Barry says the standard of healthcare for New Zealanders with terminal and chronic illnesses is so high euthanasia should not be considered as an alternative.

Ms Barry’s All Party Parliamentary Group on Palliative Care will meet for the first time today and aims to improve MPs’ understanding of the care available.

Palliative care focuses on relieving the suffering of patients with chronic or life-threatening illnesses.

Ms Barry was partly inspired to form the group after witnessing the high-quality care her parents received before their deaths.

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Palliative care vs assisted dying: A false dichotomy – frogblog by Kevin Hague (8/16/12) – When I arrived at the meeting today it was to a room full of perhaps 70 people from outside Parliament and the full range of parliamentary media. We were given several different presentations, compered by Maggie. While there was some content on palliative care, the absolute focus of the meeting was on mounting arguments against voluntary euthanasia and assisted dying.

Now I believe there should be a very active public debate about Maryan Street’s Bill. I will both participate and listen with considerable interest, but I believe this needs to occur independent of debate over palliative care. It is just nonsensical to present palliative care and assisted dying as some sort of dichotomy between which society must choose. I personally believe in really great palliative care services. I also believe in assisted dying services. I resent the conflation of the two issues.

I also resent very considerably being lured to a harangue against assisted dying (not even a discussion) under false pretences. I believe it was deceitful of Maggie to invite MPs to a meeting about palliative care, but then to have different agenda, particularly in an environment where challenging or leaving would appear churlish and destructive.

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Euthanasia debate starts up again by Adrien Taylor, 3news.co.nz (8/16/12) – The debate on whether euthanasia should be legalised in New Zealand is once again heating up as local and international campaigners gather in Wellington for a conference on the issue.

It’s an argument that provokes strong reactions and is bound to create fault lines in Parliament if Labour MP Maryan Street has her Private Member’s Bill to legalise drawn from the ballot.

“I think there are more people who want to be as self-determining at their end point as they have been during their life and I for one, don’t think they can be told they can’t be,” she says.

She says her End-of-Life Choice Bill would make it legal for those who are terminally ill, or have an irreversible medical condition, but are still mentally fit, the right to choose to die, and for assisting clinicians or family members to be protected from liability.

And she’s confident she’ll have the support of other MPs, if the bill gets drawn.

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Barry denies undercover bid to derail suicide bill by Issac Davison, nzherald.co.nz (8/17/12) – National MP Maggie Barry has defended her new cross-party parliamentary group against accusations it was created solely to kill off a Labour MP’s bill to legalise assisted suicide.

Opposition MPs were furious that Ms Barry’s discussion group for palliative care focused only on arguments against euthanasia at its first meeting yesterday.

She was accused of using the all-parliamentary group on palliative care to derail Labour Party MP Maryan Street’s End of Life Choice Bill.

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Palliative Care and Euthanasia – Kiwiblog (8/17/12) – So palliative care is not an alternative to euthanasia in all cases. And where it is an alternative – it should be a choice for the dying person. I do not think it is the role of the state to tell people they can not end their lives if they are in agony. The role of the state should be to put in place rigorous safeguards around those decisions.

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Comfort in the option of a dignified death by Kathryn Powley and Susan Edmunds – nzherald.co.nz (8/19/12) – As the country debates the rights and wrongs of assisted suicide, Kathryn Powley remembers the death of her mother – and asks how it might have been different – while Susan Edmunds looks at the proposed euthanasia bill.

I stroked him as he lay there calmly. I held his little paw as the needle went in, and I kept holding it as he closed his eyes for the last time. And that was that.
I felt relief and was surprised that Huckle seemed to feel nothing. He just went to sleep.
There was no dying gasp. No nothing. Just there one minute, gone the next. It was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made, and whenever I think of that moment I wonder why my lovely Mum couldn’t have had the luxury of such a calm, peaceful passing.

Mum died in North Haven Hospice, in Whangarei, 3 months after a sudden, out-of-the-blue diagnosis of terminal bowel cancer. It had spread to her liver and nothing could be done.
She had so much to do, so many plans, so many trips overseas she had yet to take. She’d worked and saved so hard. Now this? “Just knock me on the head,” she’d say. And she meant it. “I could drive the car off a cliff,” she’d say. And she meant that, too.
Although she hated what she’d been reduced to, she never made peace with the fact she was dying. She simply didn’t want to leave us. Her will to stay was battling with her desire to go.
Mum breathed her final, laboured breath on January 11, 2005, in the wee hours in North Haven Hospice with me, Sarah and Andrew beside her.
It was sad, but it was a relief. But I will always wish that her passing, with her blessing, could have been as peaceful and dignified as her beloved Huckle’s.

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Editorial: Euthanasia bill under fire – Waikato Times (8/20/12) – The group would have created no fuss (and might have attracted little attention) except that Ms Barry’s primary motivation was reported to be opposition to assisted suicide as an alternative for seriously ill patients. Euthanasia should not be considered as an alternative, she said, because the standard of healthcare for New Zealanders with terminal and chronic illnesses is so high.
Ms Barry, too, denounced Ms Street’s measure as a terrible bill that failed to protect vulnerable patients.

Perhaps it is. But euthanasia is not being promoted to replace palliative care. The purpose is to allow a dying person to make that choice under strict conditions. That’s consistent with National Party principles. Among them, National aims to build a society based on values that include individual freedom and choice and personal responsibility. Ms Barry should brush up on them.

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Bigmouth Maggie strikes again: An Auckland minute by Richard Boock – AucklandNow (8/21/12) – May I just say I’m pleased Maggie Barry’s parents received top-class palliative care before their deaths. That’s a good outcome. But for the National Party MP to use the experience as the basis for her stand against voluntary euthanasia inflates an already well-established sense of conceit to startling new levels. According to Barry, since her folks escaped a nightmarish end to their lives, there’s no reason why everyone else can’t as well.

Or, in other words, there’s no need for euthanasia.

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Euthanasia already happening in hospitals– PM by Michael Forbes – stuff.co.nz (8/21/12) – Prime Minister John Key says euthanasia already happens in our hospitals – and if he was terminally ill, he would consider it.

Doctors disagreed with him last night, saying his view of the situation was too simplistic.

Mr Key said yesterday that he could understand the argument that legalising euthanasia might put pressure on the elderly to end their lives early, in the face of “rapacious grandkids”, but “I don’t really buy that argument”.

“I think there’s a lot of euthanasia that effectively happens in our hospitals,” he told Newstalk ZB.

“. . . If I had terminal cancer, I had a few weeks to live, I was in tremendous amount of pain – if they just effectively wanted to turn off the switch and legalise that by legalising euthanasia, I’d want that.”

Labour MP Maryan Street is drafting a member’s bill to legalise euthanasia – and the emotive subject is already sparking debate even before it is in the ballot.

Mr Key signalled his broad support for euthanasia, but said he was not sure if he could support Ms Street’s bill, which looked likely to have some “quirks” that he did not agree with.

“So I may or may not vote for that bill, [but] the broader principle I support.”

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Patient’s wishes paramount– Opinion: Otago Daily Times (8/21/12) – As admirable as palliative care practitioners are, I find there is something disturbing in their zealous obsession that a patient whose life philosophy is different from their own, needs re-education on their deathbed.

Such a patient must, according to Prof Ilora Finlay, be a “control freak” or they must have been subtly coerced by family and society to consider themselves “burdensome”.

They now need to learn that they are valued – as proven by disregarding their wishes. If only palliative care practitioners could accept their patients as they are, they could do even more good than the considerable good they already do.

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John Key ‘broadly supports’ voluntary euthanasia by John Key (8/23/12) – …director of the Association of Salaried Medical Specialists, Ian Powell, did not think euthanasia was occurring the way Mr Key made out.

“The situation is much more complex than that,” he told local media.

“Sometimes continuing a treatment can prolong the agony for a patient, and not even keep the patient alive.

“By not prolonging the agony . . . even though the intent is not for the patient to die, it is sometimes a consequence.”

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PM’s ‘misguided’ euthanasia views anger palliative care specialists by Claire Trevett – nzherald.co.nz (8/24/12) -The comments have angered hospice and palliative care specialists. Sinead Donnelly, New Zealand chairwoman of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine, said Mr Key had misrepresented the care of terminal patients.

“His personal opinion given as Prime Minister has serious negative consequences in the trust people have in hospital care of the seriously ill.”

She said it was not considered euthanasia to abide by a patient’s right to refuse treatment or if treatment to alleviate symptoms had the unintended consequence of hastening death.

She said the society agreed with the Medical Association’s position on euthanasia, which was that doctor-assisted suicide or euthanasia was unethical – and even if it was legalised it would continue to be unethical.

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Euthanasia claim sparks anger by Bronwyn Torrie (8/24/12) – Angry doctors are appalled at Prime Minister John Key’s claims that euthanasia already happens in hospitals.

“We never practise euthanasia; euthanasia is the deliberate ending of life, and is illegal and unethical,” Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine chairwoman Sinead Donnelly said.

Mr Key’s comments could seriously damage the trust people had in hospital care of the seriously ill, the Wellington doctor said.

Mr Key signalled his broad support for euthanasia – medical assistance to die – during a stint on Newstalk ZB this week.

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Euthanasia clinic touted for Fiji by Michael Field – stuff.co.nz (8/24/12) – Fiji is considering opening a euthanasia clinic where seriously ill Australians and New Zealanders can fly to for assisted suicides, Australian euthanasia advocate Dr Philip Nitschke says.

He has told the Age in Melbourne that the centre he proposes in the tourist city of Nadi would be like a similar clinic in Switzerland, where about 1000 foreigners have died since 1998.

In a proposal sent to military regime appointed attorney-general, Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum, Dr Nitschke said Fiji could generate “considerable income” with demand expected to come from people in Australia, New Zealand, Asia and India, who do not have access to physician-assisted suicide.

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Key euthanasia claim ‘wrong’  by Alexia Johnston – stuff.co.nz (8/24/12) – Ms Ligtenberg, who is also a Green Party spokesperson, said her comments were based on her own views, not those of her nursing colleagues.

She said she understood that, in some palliative care cases, it was possible that patients were given extra pain medication “to make them less aware” of how ill they were in their final days. However, she did not regard that practice to be euthanasia.

“Euthanasia … is not happening because it’s illegal, but what goes on when you look at palliative care is that possibly people are getting [an increase in pain] medication, so they don’t feel the pain.

“You increase the medication – it’s not the medication as such that causes death.”

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Key’s euthanasia view ill-informed: doctor by Eileen Goodwin – Otago Daily times (8/26/12) – Those wishing to shorten their lives with euthanasia are trying to control what should be a natural process, Otago Community Hospice palliative care registrar Dr Louise Bremer says.

She said Prime Minister John Key’s view aired this week was “simplistic” and “ill-informed”.

Dr Bremer, who also works at Dunedin Hospital as a physician in medical oncology, said euthanasia was not performed in either hospices or hospitals in New Zealand.

Doctors never caused or hastened death, she said.

Through working closely with the patient, clinicians did not extend life unduly, which did not constitute any form of hastened death, she said.

Communication with the patient was critical.

While some patients requested an end to their pain and suffering, this generally was a call for some form of relief, rather than death itself.

She believed people had become used to controlling every aspect of their lives, and this was behind calls for legalising euthanasia.

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Key admits euthanasia comments ‘sloppy’ by Danya Levy – TheDominion Post (8/27/12) – Prime Minister John Key has backed away from his comments about euthanasia, saying his language on the sensitive issue was “a bit sloppy”.

Key last week said euthanasia already happened in our hospitals – and if he was terminally ill, he would consider it.

The comment angered doctors who said euthanasia was never practised as it was the deliberate ending of life, and was illegal and unethical.

The suggestion could seriously damage the trust people had in hospital care of the terminally ill, doctors said.

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Rodney on Euthanasia – Kiwiblog (8/27/12) – Up until reading this account some years ago, I had been slightly anti-euthanasia. Coming from a medical family I did not like the idea of doctors ever having a role in ending life rather than preserving it. But I realised how selfish that preference was, when I read the awful choice the current law forced on people like Martin. No one should ever have been forced into having to make the choice he did.

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Skill levels better in palliative care by Teuila Fuatai – Bay of Plenty Times (8/29/12) – Legalising euthanasia could cut short people’s lives who may be unaware of advances in palliative care, a Tauranga doctor warns.

Waipuna Hospice chief executive Dr Richard Thurlow told the Bay of Plenty Times patients sometimes wished they had the option of physician-assisted suicide. But that was before they realised the options available with palliative care.

“The level of palliative care in the last seven years alone has developed hugely.

“The skills of the medics and the understanding and the knowledge of all the associated disciplines … has meant the level of care has improved dramatically.”

Dr Thurlow’s comments follow remarks by prime minister John Key on Newstalk ZB last week.

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Debate clouding hospice role by Imran Ali – The Northern Advocate (8/31/12) – The importance of easing the suffering of dying Northlanders is being lost in the debate on euthanasia, Northland hospice staff say.

Their comments followed remarks by Prime Minister John Key that a lot of euthanasia happened in hospitals and that if he was terminally ill he would want euthanasia legalised so doctors could “turn off the switch”.

Palliative care, for those affected by a life-limiting condition, can be provided by specialists or non-specialist staff such as GPs and community health teams.

Peter Bassett, general manager of Whangarei’s North Haven Hospice, said euthanasia was not happening in New Zealand hospitals but good palliative care was.

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RUSSIA

Euthanasia – luxury for the wealthy– pravada.ru (8/18/12) – The topic of euthanasia does not leave anyone indifferent. Voluntary withdrawal from life due to serious illness for some people is a grievous sin, for others – the only escape from suffering.

It should be noted that many critics of the law referred to its social injustice. Euthanasia is not cheap, which means that patients from poor families will not be able to die quickly and painlessly. However, it became clear that less wealthy Americans are not particularly inclined to interrupt their tortures with drugs. Euthanasia, according to recent studies in the U.S., attracts financially sound white people with good education.

According to The New York Times, the supporters of euthanasia do not choose it because of the pain, but because they want to control their death as well as they can control their lives.

“Likely, the practice of euthanasia in some form will be implemented in the world.  In Russia euthanasia is illegal, and I now fully agree with that, and not on logistical grounds, but because the meaning of medical practice is to provide life and the patient’s health, and the killing as a way to treat the pain may not be acceptable. There is no pain that cannot be managed. This practice may cause psychological pressure on the elderly, for example, because of financial reasons.

But since there is an issue, and the question arises about its implementation, it should not be the issue of the medical community. This may be a special procedure performed by some social workers. Of course, I would caution to call euthanasia of a seriously ill person a murder, because there is no offense if all procedures are followed.”

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SCOTLAND

It is time for politicians to take a more enlightened view of assisted dying– heraldscotland.com (8/25/12) – In June 2012, a significant development took place in Vancouver, when the Supreme Court ruled that the Canadian criminal code, which prohibits physician-assisted death, violated fundamental rights of equality, life and liberty. The wisdom lying behind that judgment is profound. Terminally ill individuals who experience intolerable suffering now have the opportunity to bring that legally and humanely to an end. The court was satisfied that commonly-advanced reasons for denying them relief, including the protection of the vulnerable and damage to the trust patients invest in doctors, could be properly answered, if that was allowed in highly constrained circumstances.

While it is widely recognised that Switzerland permits doctors to practise euthanasia and extends this to foreign nationals with the financial means (about £10,000) to avail themselves of that option, it is less well known that other jurisdictions, including Oregon and Washington in the US and the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg in Europe, also take a more enlightened view of assisted dying than we do.

In 2011 MSPs in Holyrood rejected any change to the law concerning assistance at the end of life. However, in the near future Margo MacDonald will introduce a Bill again seeking to amend the legislation.

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SWITZERLAND

Assisted suicide firm Dignitas to sue Swiss police for reviving terminally ill woman who fell asleep during procedure by Martin Robinson in MailOnline (8/16/12) – The world’s foremost euthanasia clinic, Dignitas, is to sue the Swiss police after their officers tried to revive a terminally ill woman who fell asleep during an assisted suicide.

Police stopped the procedure near Zurich after the patient lost consciousness after only consuming half the drugs meant to kill her, and therefore officers assumed that her suicide attempt had failed.

The unnamed woman was meant to finish the lethal cocktail of barbiturates and police say their rules state that if a patient is still alive two hours after taking the drugs they will call an ambulance.

Following the intervention the woman in her 60s, who was suffering from a genetic disease and weighed only five stone, was rushed to hospital were she later died.

Under Swiss law, a state official – usually a police officer – must be present to monitor proceedings when an assisted suicide is being conducted.

And Dignitas now want the police to be prosecuted for ‘interfering in a legal assisted suicide’ and ‘abducting a patient’ during the incident on August 2.

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UNITED KINGDOM

Euthanasia and the Death Penalty: a dilemma by Andre Langlois – HuffPost Lifestyle UK (8/1/12) – I don’t believe the dilemma is inescapable. A similar argument can be made against other laws, such as motoring laws, and assisted dying is certainly about facilitating individual freedom. But when it comes to the state facilitating death, my opposition to the death penalty strikes an uneasy contrast with my support for assisted dying.

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Assisted dying debate: promoting patient choice – Kennedy-law.com article (8/8/12) – On 3 July 2012 the All Party Parliamentary Group on Choice at the End of Life (the APPG) in partnership with the charity, Dignity in Dying, published a consultation on a draft Bill entitled “Safeguarding Choice: A draft Assisted Dying Bill”. Whilst this draft Bill is not written (or sponsored) by a government department and is, therefore, unlikely to be taken forward as draft legislation in the near future, its publication provides the opportunity to engage in the assisted dying debate.

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There’ll be no happy ending for us… please just let my father die in peace by Sophie Goodchild, London Evening Standard (8/15/12) – The daughter of a man with “locked in” syndrome today made an emotional final plea for him to end his life peacefully.

Lauren Nicklinson, 25, said her severely disabled father Tony will have to starve himself to death unless doctors are allowed to help him die.

The High Court will reveal tomorrow whether the stroke victim, 58, has won his bid to challenge Britain’s euthanasia laws. He wants doctors to be able to end his life without fear of being sent to jail.

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Assisted suicide comment: euthanasia puts vulnerable at risk, argues Rev Dr Brendan McCarthy in The Telegraph (8/16/12) – It is a tragedy that Mr Nicklinson has suffered a stroke, resulting in ‘locked in syndrome’, but it would also be a tragedy if, in a desire to address his needs, others were placed at unjustifiable risk. Sometimes, even with a heavy heart, it is necessary to make a tough decision in order to protect those who most need protection.

That is, in part, the role of the state and the role of the law.

Rev Dr Brendan McCarthy is the National Adviser on medical ethics and health and social care policy to the Church of England’s Archbishops’ Council.

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Assisted suicide comment: the dying should have advice from professionals – The Telegraph (8/16/12) – Two cases of patients with locked-in syndrome, AM and Tony Nicklinson, were heard in the High Court in June, and the court will rule on both today. While these cases may appear similar on the surface; they are actually very different, and in fact challenge different laws.

Should AM succeed, doctors and patients will be clearer about what discussions they can and can’t have about end of life choices, and should Nicklinson win his case the current inflexibility of murder law will have to be addressed.

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UK denies right-to-die legal challenge by Maria Cheng, HuffPost Tech (8/16/12) – Britain’s High Court on Thursday rejected an attempt by a man who has locked-in syndrome to overturn the country’s euthanasia law by refusing to legally allow doctors to end his life.

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“Locked-in” sufferer’s challenge to ban on voluntary euthanasia fails in high court by Rosalind English, UK Human Rights Blog (8/16/12) – Lord Justice Toulson, sitting with Mrs Justice Royce and Mrs Justice Macur, has  handed down judgment in the case of Tony Nicklinson and that of another “locked-in” syndrome sufferer, “Martin”. On all the issues, they have deferred to parliament to take the necessary steps to address the problems created by the current law of murder and assisted suicide.

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U.K. court denies euthanasia requests from two men with locked-in syndrome,CBS News (8/16/12) – Tony Nicklinson, a man with “locked-in syndrome,” has been denied by a British court his wish to die from physician-assisted euthanasia.

Britain’s High Court on Thursday rejected Nicklinson’s and another man’s attempts to overturn the country’s euthanasia law by refusing to legally allow doctors to end his life.

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UK doctors ‘perform euthanasia’– top Dutch medic by Anna Holligan, BBC News Europe (8/16/12) – In the Netherlands euthanasia has been legal for a decade. Some Dutch medical experts say Tony Nicklinson’s case is a “textbook example” of why people should be given the right to decide when they die.

According to Dr Kruseman, “if the only possibility is death by euthanasia it’s the responsibility you have for your patient when they are experiencing unbearable suffering”.

Commenting on the doctor’s claim, a spokesperson for the British Medical Association (BMA) said: “We are opposed to the legalisation of assisted dying and we are not lobbying for any change in the law in the UK.

“Assisted dying is illegal in the UK, so doctors are not permitted to carry out euthanasia.”

The Royal Dutch Medical Association (KNMG) says that in the absence of an open debate the practice will go on, but in a covert and unregulated manner.

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RCP comment on assisted dying case (8/16/12) – Commenting on today’s judgment in the Tony Nicklinson assisted dying case, Professor John Saunders, Chair of the RCP’s Ethics Committee, said:

‘The Royal College of Physicians does not support a change in the law on assisted dying. It remains illegal for doctors to intentionally and deliberately terminate the life of someone who is not terminally ill. A survey of RCP fellows and members in 2006 showed that doctors were not in favour of a change in the law to allow them to do this.

‘A change in the law would also have severe implications for the way society views disabled people.’

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Assisted dying: the harm in helping by Sarah Wollaston, guardian.co.uk (8/17/12) – t isn’t just the religious lobby that is opposed to a change in the law to allow assisted suicide. I have no faith banner to raise, and as a former doctor I know there are conditions for which I might at some point wish to end my life. Despite this, I don’t believe I should have a right to make a doctor complicit in that decision.

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Allow medically assisted dying on the grounds of mercy, and soon it will be driven by convenience or greedby Steve Doughty, Mail Online (8/17/12) – One of the peculiar horrors of learning about the life of Mr Nicklinson is imagining what it would be like yourself to be entirely helpless for six hours every evening until a carer comes to wash you. Or to eat only soft mashed up food, and to drink only through a tube inserted into your stomach.And to know it could happen to any one of us, anytime.That gives Mr Nicklinson’s plea to die a universal relevance.
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Dying with dignity debate: Should doctors be allowed to help Tony Nicklinson end his life? Mirror News (8/17/12) – Below are the arguments for and against allowing doctors to end his life without fear of prosecution:
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I would help a relative on the final journey by Vickie Woods – The Telegraph (8/17/12) – We need to have a conversation about assisted suicide,” one of my oldest friends told me last year. Oh, crikey. It was dark and filthy weather and I was driving her to an appointment with her GP, so I was furious with myself for mounting the pavement in shock at what she’d said. After which she clung silently to the car door and I drove very, very concentratedly.

I wasn’t shocked that thoughts of assisted suicide had floated into her mind. Because it floats into my mind every time there’s another heartbreak landmark legal battle trumpeting through the newspaper. Nor was I shocked that she’d addressed her thoughts to me. We are both of an age where assisted suicide is something you have to take a view on, like early retirement or selling up and trading down.

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Analysis: Britain’s options for legalizing euthanasia by Louise Bazalgette, politics.co.uk (8/20/12) – In their ruling, the judges were clear that: “It is not for the court to decide whether the law about assisted dying should be changed and, if so, what safeguards should be put in place. Under our system of government these are matters for parliament to decide, representing society as a whole, after parliamentary scrutiny, and not for the court on the facts of an individual case or cases.”

This is not surprising as previous legal precedents, such as Diane Pretty’s case at the European court of human rights (ECHR) in 2002, have confirmed that the legal position of assisted dying is a matter for national law and cannot simply be overturned on the basis that it infringes an individual’s human rights.

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Locked-in man devastated at ruling– Cambridge-news.co.uk (8/20/12) – Lord Justice Toulson, Mr Justice Royce and Mrs Justice Macur, while expressing deep sympathy for their plight, unanimously agreed that it would be wrong for the court to depart from the long-established legal position that “voluntary euthanasia is murder, however understandable the motives may be”.

Refusing the stricken men judicial review, they agreed that the current law did not breach human rights and it was for Parliament, not the courts, to decide whether it should be changed. Any changes would need “the most carefully structured safeguards which only Parliament can deliver”.

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Assisted dying: simple, neat – and wrong – spked-online.com (8/20/12) – At first, Tony Nicklinson’s case seems obvious. Having suffered a massive stroke in 2005, Nicklinson – a former civil engineer who once enjoyed an active lifestyle – was left almost completely paralysed, in a state referred to as ‘locked-in syndrome’. He can only communicate by blinking or using limited head movement. He refers to his life now as ‘dull, miserable, demeaning, undignified and intolerable’. Nicklinson would like the courts to offer immunity from prosecution if, in the future, he asked a doctor to kill him. Last week, the High Court in London ruled against his request.

As many observers agreed, it is his life and who are we – or the courts or parliament – to tell him what to do with it? We all have the right to commit suicide but those with locked-in syndrome need assistance. Nicklinson is quite visibly suffering and has been consistent in his wish to die, so why not allow him to do so?

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Sympathy for one man must not change Britain’s law on assisted dying by Sameer Mallick – opendemocracy.net (8/20/12) – Assisted dying is illegal in the UK – a stance supported by the majority of the medical profession. In the face of harrowing cases such as that of Tony Nicklinson, it is important to remember that unwillingness to deviate from this law is not the symptom of a narrow prejudice but the result of a long and informed debate.

Perhaps a good starting point is to clarify the jargon, as the terms assisted dying, euthanasia and assisted suicide seem to be used interchangeably by mainstream media. The term assisted suicide describes the participation of an individual (usually a healthcare professional) helping a patient end their life. However the onus is on the patient to perform the final act of killing, such as self administering a lethal injection. This differs from euthanasia in which the ‘assistant’ performs the final act which ends a patient’s life. Both actions come under the overarching term known as assisted dying. Whilst the focus of lobby groups has been to legalise assisted suicide in the UK,[6] the case of Tony Nicklinson is one in which, if successful, would have gone one step further and legalised euthanasia.

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Coffee House Chat (UK) – Assisted suicide – your thoughts –  thoughts from everyday people

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Practical Ethics – Euthanasia and Human Rights – University of Oxford (8/21/12)

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Locked in to euthanasia – mercatornet.com (8/21/12) – There can be no more difficult case for dispassionate discussion than the fate of Tony Nicklinson, a totally paralysed British man who wants to end his life. Last week the UK High Court denied his request for euthanasia. (video)

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In Britain, ongoing struggles over laws regarding euthanasia by Simon Caldwell, Catholic News Service (8/22/12) – The Catholic Church, not wishing to see the debate presented as a struggle between faith and “progress,” is generally taking a back seat, but is listed as one among dozens of medical, disabled rights and religious charities that form the broad coalition of the Care Not Killing alliance.

Catholic doctors are more outspoken than church leaders, however, and in recent months some have taken huge risks with their careers to warn the public that a system designed to care for people in their final hours is operating effectively as a euthanasia pathway.

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Paralyzed UK man dies after losing assisted-suicide case(8/22/12) – (video) A British man suffering from “locked-in syndrome” who fought a long legal battle over assisted suicide died Wednesday, his family said.Tony Nicklinson, 58, had been refusing food since last week, contracted pneumonia over the weekend, and “went downhill rapidly,” said his lawyer, Saimo Chahal.”Before he died, he asked us to tweet: ‘Goodbye world the time has come, I had some fun,'” his Twitter account said.
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Melksham locked in syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson dies at home after contracting pneumonia by Will Frampton – Wiltshire Times (8/22/12) – Locked in syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson has died, his family have said.They said the 58-year-old died at his home in Melksham of natural causes at 10am.His wife Jane said on Twitter: “I have lost the love of my life but he suffers no more.”Last week he learnt he had lost his appeal against a decision to forbid him from assisted suicide.He was left paralysed by a catastrophic stroke while on a business trip to Athens in 2005.Mr Nicklinson’s lawyer Saimo Chahal Family said: “I am extremely sad to tell you that I received a call at 10.45am from Jane Nicklinson to inform me that her husband Tony died peacefully at home at about 10am this morning.
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Tony Nicklinson: fight to die with dignity “will not be forgotten” by Sarah Boseley – guardian.co.uk (8/22/12) – At 10am on Wednesday, Tony Nicklinsonfinally got what he wanted. In his Wiltshire home, surrounded by those he loved, he slipped into a peaceful death.Less than a week before, millions had seen him outside the high court in his wheelchair, racked with sobs. His wife, Jane, spoke to the TV cameras on his behalf, quietly explaining his distress at the refusal of the court to give him the assurance he had requested: that anyone who helped him to kill himself would not be charged with murder.Once she paused, to wipe away his tears. Even those who disagreed with him, including the judges, were deeply moved.
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BHA mourns Tony Nicklinson, campaigner for assisted dying – British Humanist Assn. (8/22/12) – Andrew Copson, BHA Chief Executive, commented, ‘Tony Nicklinson’s campaign was inspirational and his fight for the right of mentally competent adults to choose to end their lives woth medical assistance was a fight that we at the BHA very much supported. We will continue to campaign for the legalisation of assisred suicide, as will many others – their determination renewed by his example.’
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We need the right to a dignified death. But we need to acknowledge the risks involved, as well. by Tom Chivers – The Telegraph (8/22/12) – The trouble with us as a species is that we’re not very good at complexity and nuance. If we think something’s bad, we think it’s all bad; if we think something’s good, we think it’s all good. It’s been demonstrated that if we think something has plenty of benefits, we tend to subconsciously downplay its risks; likewise, if we think it’s risky, we’ll tend to assume it’s got no benefits.
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Paralyzed UK man dies after losing assisted-suicide case – CNN (8/23/12) – A British man suffering from “locked-in syndrome” who fought a long legal battle over assisted suicide died Wednesday, his family said.Tony Nicklinson, 58, had been refusing food since last week, contracted pneumonia over the weekend, and “went downhill rapidly,” said his lawyer, Saimo Chahal.”Before he died, he asked us to tweet: ‘Goodbye world the time has come, I had some fun,'” his Twitter account said.
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Widow backs assisted suicide campaign after husband’s death– Maidenhead Advertiser (8/23/12) – A widow whose husband died alone because he feared the consequences for her if she helped end his life has backed calls to legalise assisted suicide.Sheila King has added her voice to the campaign to change the law as she believes her husband Stephen would still be alive today if he had been granted the right to decide when to end his life.Instead she faced the heartbreak of finding his body hanging in the garage of their home in Bedford Close, Maidenhead, in April.”Had my husband been able to choose when to end his life he would have enjoyed a longer and happier one,” she said.”I just want to do something to help other people so they don’t have to be in that situation.”
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Pro-lifers to host European euthanasia meeting in Scotland– The Christian Institute (8/23/12) – Pro-life experts from around the world are gathering in Edinburgh next month for a symposium on euthanasia and assisted suicide.The Care Not Killing Alliance, which campaigns against attempts to weaken end-of-life laws across the UK, is hosting the meeting.The group says anyone who is “committed to opposing euthanasia and assisted suicide” is welcome.
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How an extraordinary day with Tony Nicklinson changed my views on right-to-die by Peter Stanford – The Telegraph (8/24/12) – There aren’t many meetings that change your instinctive notions of what is right and wrong, but the day I spent with Tony and Jane Nicklinson was one. It may be because I am a lifelong Catholic, for better or worse, and my Church is so unbending in insisting that God gives and takes away life. Or that I have spent 20 years as chairman of a disability charity and have seen too often the casual mistreatment of those whom society once labelled “in-valid”. Or simply that I had never previously had the debate about the right-to-die spelt out so uncompromisingly for me by someone in the midst of the issue.

But if I went into the Nicklinsons’ specially adapted bungalow in the Wiltshire town of Melksham fundamentally opposed to any concessions on euthanasia, I emerged with my arguments demolished. And this by a man who had lost the power of speech.

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Tony Nicklinson’s legacy: his case will save lives by Joan Smith – The Independent (8/26/12) – When Tony Nicklinson died on Wednesday, there was widespread sympathy for a man who had been paralysed from the neck down. The previous week he had wept in front of TV cameras, devastated by the High Court’s refusal to give him an assurance that anyone who helped him to die would not face a charge of murder. Photographs of Mr Nicklinson before his illness, looking healthy and tanned, offered a painful contrast with the helplessness he endured after a massive stroke in 2005. The case has redoubled calls for a change in the law on assisted dying.
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The ban on euthanasia is to protect us from ourselves by Peter Mullen – The Telegraph (8/28/12) – The debate about euthanasia is being obscured by the use of pernicious euphemisms. Let’s come clean and speak plainly. “The doctor’s right to end a life” means the doctor has the right to kill someone. Whichever way you look at this, it means a licence to murder. Those who campaign for euthanasia want a change in the law so that this sort of killing – for that’s what it is – should no longer be against the law. This has far-reaching consequences, for it means that, in some cases, murder will no longer be murder.
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Tony Nicklinson’s widow in campaign pledge– guardian.co.uk (8/28/12) – Jane Nicklinson, who, along with daughters Lauren and Beth, had backed her husband’s legal bid, echoed other right-to-die campaigners’ calls for Mr Nicklinson’s memory to live on through a continued battle to change the law that prevented doctors ending his life.Speaking to the BBC, Mrs Nicklinson said: “This is certainly not the end of the campaign. I do hope that someone takes it up. Even though we didn’t win, all the hard work for the case has been done. I hope at some point someone will come forward and carry on with what Tony started.”I think we always knew the chances of winning at this stage were slim – possible but slim – and we’d never been told anything different so we were prepared for it.”
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Tony Nicklinson Right-to-Die: Locked-in Sufferer’s Widow Urges Change in Law– The Huffington Post-UK (8/28/12) – Tony Nicklinson’s widow has said she hopes people will continue to campaign for a change in the law on assisted dying following her husband’s death.58-year-old Mr Nicklinson suffered from locked-in syndrome and died last week after losing a landmark High Court right-to-die case. He had been refusing food in the days leading up to his death and had contracted pneumonia.Following the decision he was visibly distressed, sobbing in front of cameras while Jane Nicklinson told reporters the ruling had left him “heartbroken.”
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Bishop urges caution after Nicklinson assisted dying case– Christian Concern (8/29/12) – Bishop Michael Nazir-Ali has warned that “moral chaos” will ensue if the Christian basis for the laws protecting life in the UK is rejected.He made the comments after a controversial article by former Catholic Herald editor, Peter Stanford, was published in the Telegraph last week (24 August).Stanford said that a visit to Tony Nicklinson’s home “changed his views” on the right-to-die issue.
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I hope Tony’s death will not end the fight– This is Bath (8/29/12) – The widow of ‘right-to-die’ campaigner Tony Nicklinson has said she hopes the battle to change the law on assisted dying will continue even without the brave Melksham man being around to fight it.Jane Nicklinson said she hoped ‘someone will come forward’ to continue the challenge to British law to allow those with ‘locked-in syndrome’, which left her husband reliant on others for everything, to be legally killed to end their suffering.
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Unitarians launch consultation on assisted dying– ekklesia.co.uk (8/30/12) – British Unitarians have begun a six-month consultation on the issue of assisted dying. By exploring a range of views on the issue, they say they are bucking the trend of faith groups, many of whom have taken a strong stand against assisted dying.The General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches will conduct the consultation in the run-up to their next annual meeting in April. A discussion pack is being sent out to congregations to assist them in their deliberations.
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Bristol to host Green Party’s right-to-die debate– Bristol247.com (8/31/12) – A debate on changing the law to allow people such as right-to-die campaigner Tony Nicklinson to seek help to end their lives will take place next weekend in Bristol at the Green Party’s autumn conference.The party said it aimed to “provide the right to an assisted death within a rigorous framework of regulation, and in the context of the availability of the highest level of palliative care”.After looking at how assisted dying laws are formulated in the Netherlands, Switzerland and the USA, the debate will focus on presenting a solution that could gain the support of the public.
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Melksham man: Tony has shown law must change by Will Frampton – Wiltshire Times(8/31/12) –

Tony Nicklinson with wife Jane and daughters Beth and Lauren after the court decision Tony Nicklinson with wife Jane and daughters Beth and Lauren after the court decision.

Labour peer Lord Joel Joffe has joined other assisted dying campaigners in praising Melksham locked-in syndrome sufferer Tony Nicklinson.

Lord Joffe said his ‘incredible courage’ would eventually lead to a change in the law, under which those who help people end their lives currently face prosecution for murder.

“I think Tony Nicklinson’s incredible courage and determination has persuaded society the law must be changed to prevent terrible suffering,” said the peer.

“Tony correctly felt there needed to be a change in the law to permit him to end his life, and it is clear we do need a change in the law – the law must seek to find such a solution.

“MPs are not listening to society, their job is to take account of the views of their constituents and 80 per cent of the public is in favour of a change in the law.”

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Assisted Death Debate – News from July 2012

End-of-Life discussions about Assisted Dying/Suicide/Euthanasia in news articles, blogs, videos from the left, right and center during the month of July 2012. This is a place to find out what’s being talked about around the world as we sort out this highly emotional and controversial issue.

Become informed, open your mind,  join in the discussions. Our leaders need to know what people are thinking and we need to know what our leaders are considering in terms of laws. These are conversations we all need to have!

BLOGS

What is your opinion of assisted suicide for the terminally ill? Live Poll

Living with Dying: Major Myths about Death With Dignity by Melissa Barber (2/27/12)

the Front Door to Healthcare – Coming to a hospital near you: physician-assisted suicide  (7/2/12)

Salon – Where’s our right to die? by Santiago Wills (7/3/12)

HuffPost-Religion – A Scientific Honoring of Death by Rev. Michael Dowd (7/8/12)

Medical Talk – Ethics: Physician Assisted Suicide (7/9/12)

Secondhand Smoke – Swiss proves no brakes assisted suicide by Wesley J. Smith (7/9/12)

MedPageToday.com – Take Docs Out of Assisted Suicide Equation? by Emily P. Walker (7/11/12)

National Right to Life News Today – Pro-Euthanasia Forces at Work at Home and Abroad: The latest in the battle over assisting suicide by Jennifer Popik, J.D. (7/11/12)

The Economist – Time to Die (7/12/12)

White Coat Notes – Chelsea Conaboy: Assisted dying, without the doctor? Ethicist says physicians can help without prescribing lethal dose (7/12/12)

New Europe Post online – Dying in Court by Peter Singer (7/12/12)

The Economist – The quality of death: Grim reapings (7/15/12)

Compassion & Choices – The Evolving State of Physician-Assisted Suicide by Jamie Joyce, The Atlantic 7/16/12

David C. Stolinsky Blog – Coming Soon: A “Central Mechanism” for Assisted Dying (7/16/12)

Girl with a Cane – Changes to laws in Canada Regarding Physician-Assisted Suicide (7/19/12)

Playing the Devil’s Advocate – An Intriguing Objection to Euthanasia for Old White People (7/19/12)

BioEthics @ TIU – Physicians’ role in assisted dying by Steve Phillips (7/19/12)

Death with Dignity National Center – The Need for Carefully Crafted Death with Dignity Laws by Melissa Barber (7/19/12)

Secondhand Smoke – EU court won’t impose euthanasia by Wesley J. Smith (7/19/12)

LifeNews – 14% of all Dutch deaths involve euthanasia, assisted suicide by Wesley J. Smith (7/19/12)

Secondhand Smoke – Nitschke doubles down in Death-on-Demand by Wesley J. Smith 7/20/12

National Right to Life News Today – Right-to-Die movement has split into two warring camps, says Nitschke by Michael Cook (7/20/12)

LifeNews.com – Pro-Euthanasia movement splitting into two warring factions by Dr. Peter Saunders 7/20/12

emtcity.com – Physician Assisted Suicide (7/22/12)

National Right to Life News Today – EU court refuses to impose euthanasia by Paul Russell (7/23/12)

Policymic – Assisted suicide debate: Canada raises controversy after striking down ban by Lowell McDonald (7/25/12)

Not Dead Yet – Assisted suicide laws violate the ADA by Diane Coleman (7/25/12)

The Daily Caller – Death Panels on Steroids by Rita L. Marker & Wesley J. Smith of The Patients Rights Council (7/25/12)

The Tea Party Economist – Assisted Dying: The Death Panels Are Coming  by Gary North (7/26/12)

Secondhand Smoke – The Dutch Cook the Euthanasia Books by Wesley J. Smith (7/26/12)

LifeNews.com – Euthanasia backers now want assisted suicide without doctors by Wesley J.Smith (7/26/12)

Fr. Z’s Blog – Obamacare = Euthanasia (7/27/12)

White Coat Notes – Dr. Barbara Rockett: Physician-assisted suicide ‘in direct conflict’ with doctor’s role (7/31/12)

White Coat Notes – Dr. Marcia Angell: Ballot question to allow physician aid in dying respects patient wishes (7/31/12)

Sociology Lens – Physician-assisted suicide: A topic of growing importance by Candace Smith (7/31/12)

Euthanasia Prevention Coalition – Assisted Suicide: U.S. Overview by Margaret Dore (7/31/12)

JOURNAL ARTICLES

Reasons Why physicians do not have discussion about poor prognosis, why it matters, and what can be improved by Jennifer W. Mack and Thomas J. Smith in Journal of Clinical Oncology (7/2/12)

Redefining Physician’s Role in Assisted Dying by Julian J.Z. Prokopetz, BA and Lisa Soleymani Lehmann, MD, PhD in The New England Journal of Medicine (7/18/12)

VIDEOS

Euthanasia Debate  (6/30/12)
‘Canadians must act NOW against assisted suicide,’ says anti-euthanasia leader by Jean McCarthy – LifeSiteNews.com 7/3/12
Debating Euthanasia – Jennifer Tyron with panel 7/5/12 – Follow up to: Taking Mercy (3/21/12)
Aja Riggs, cancer patient, joins aid in dying lawsuit (New Mexico) (7/9/12)
Euthanasia debate with Philip Nitschke and Bernadette Tobin (7/20/12)
Sir Terry Pratchett on assisted dying (7/26/12)

BROADCASTS

Interview with Dr. Lisa Lehmann on the physician’s role in assisted dying for terminally ill patients (Director of the Center for Bioethics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital) – (7/12/12)

AARP senior end of life decisions by John Wright (7/20/12)

The Jefferson Exchange – Compassion & Choices: Oregon’s assisted-suicide law presents a number of hurdles for terminal patients to overcome to end their own lives. The group Compassion & Choices of Oregon works with the patients to overcome the hurdles.  Compassion & Choices provides access to a network of volunteers and professionals with experience in implementing Oregon’s Death With Dignity Act.  (7/30/12)

UNITED STATES

Central mechanism would remove physician from assisted-dying process by Sarah Guy( 7/24/12) – The development of a central state or federal mechanism in the USA that would confirm the authenticity and eligibility of terminally ill patients’ requests for death, dispense medication, and monitor demand and use, could remove physicians from the assisted dying process, say researchers.

Canadians and Britons would allow euthanasia under some conditions – Respondents in US are more likely to question whether doctor-assisted suicide should be permitted at all – Polls by country

Choice is an Illusion: A website opposing assisted suicide and euthanasia – many states

(News this month from California, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Texas, Wisconsin)

CALIFORNIA

Assisted suicide: compassion or crime? by Kate McGinty, mydesert.com (7/29/12)

MASSACHUSETTS

By whatever name, dignity by Lewis Cohen, MD, gazettenet.com (7/6/12)
Distilled to its essence, the ballot asks: Should dying people have the right to physician-assisted suicide?

In Massachusetts, during the months leading up to Election Day, the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church, pro-life groups, conservative politicians and segments of the disability community will unite to wage a fierce campaign.

Be prepared to hear from other opposition spokespersons that the law will target society’s most vulnerable populations. Get ready for fear-mongering to rival the rhetoric many of these same individuals have previously offered in their opposition to same-sex marriage, abortion and the right to choose birth control. We are going to hear claims that death with dignity sanctions elder abuse.

Do not expect the opposition’s leaders to cite the annual statistical report which the Oregon Health Authority publishes online. The 2011 data challenge all of these theoretical worries and concerns.

There is no factual basis for most of the arguments that will be offered, but they will make for thrilling election year drama.

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Death with Dignoty Act on November Ballot – abc40news, Springfield MA  (7/11/12) – w/video – Dr. Lewis Cohen, a local psychiatrist and professor at Tufts University School of Medicine, is one of the founding members of the petition.

The Death With Dignity Act is one of three initiatives that will be on the November ballot. If passed by voters the law would allow terminally ill patients to end their own life. “There are few people who we really can’t help with their suffering,” said Dr. Lewis Cohen.
“I can tell you as a psychiatrist a big piece of it is that people have to have the capacity to make this decision and they have to demonstrate it,” said Dr. Cohen.
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Beware slippery slope of ‘doctor-prescribed suicide’ – Letter to The Herald News (7/15/12) – One of the questions on the ballot in November will be legalization of assisted suicide, a.k.a Death With Dignity, or more accurately known as doctor-prescribed suicide.
There is no dignity in suicide. It is a terrible tragedy. If this initiative passes, it will shift our approach toward the sick and dying in this state from one of compassion and care to one of encouraging self-destruction. Doctor-prescribed suicide is medical abandonment.  A doctor will not have to be present when the patient takes the lethal drugs.
The Massachusetts Medical Society voted last December to reaffirm its opposition to physician-assisted suicide.
Life is the most basic gift from God, a gift which is entrusted to our care, not that we have control over it.
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The Evolving state of physician-assisted suicide by Jaime Joyce, theAtlantic, 7/16/12 – Should terminally ill patients have the right to kill themselves? Voters in Massachusetts will soon decide. Last Wednesday, the Secretary of the Commonwealth announced that on November 6, 2012, when Bay State voters go to the polls to pick the next President, they will also have their say on a ballot measure called the Death with Dignity Act. If passed, the law would make Massachusetts the third state to give adults diagnosed with six months or less to live the option to end their lives using a lethal dose of doctor-prescribed medication.

A study released by the Health Research and Education Trust shows that Americans are living longer lives than ever before. As a result, more individuals and families will face difficult questions about end-of-life care. In 2011, the oldest Baby Boomers turned 65. By 2030, the number of Boomers between 66 and 84 years old will climb to 61 million, and six out of 10 will be managing chronic health conditions. For the elderly and others facing terminal illness, doctors have numerous ways to prolong life. Palliative and hospice care are available to help patients find peace and comfort in their final days. But there are some people who want another option, which is the right to end suffering by taking their own life at a time and place of their choosing.
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Push for “death with dignity” in Massachusetts picks up steam by Kevin B. O’Reilly, amednews.com (7/16/12) – Early polling results: Sixty percent of Massachusetts voters support “allowing people who are dying to legally obtain medication that they could use to end their lives,” according to a Western New England University Polling Institute survey of 504 voters conducted at the end of May. Twenty-nine percent said they opposed the idea, and 11% declined to answer the question.

“This statute has worked as intended in both Oregon and Washington,” Crawford said. “The scare tactics the opposition uses simply haven’t come to life.”
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Assisted suicide backers confident they’ll win in Massachusettes – LifeNews.com( 7/27/12) – Massachusetts is the latest battleground over euthanasia with an initiative on the ballot in November to adopt a statute similar to those in Oregon and Washington, which allow physicians to prescribe suicide for their patients. As in Oregon and Washington, the Massachusetts proposal states assisted suicide would be legal for residents of the state in cases where a doctor has determined the patient has less than six months to live. However, the examples of the two Western states have shown that those safeguards do not work.
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MONTANA

“Does the Board really want to put itself in the embarrassing position of overstepping its authority by condoning this procedure?” Montanans against assisted suicide and for living with dignity (7/18/12) – I am having trouble understanding why our Montana Board of Medical Examiners would step out on a limb and seemingly promote, or at least encourage physicians to go along with a procedure, Physician Assisted Suicide for the following reasons:
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NEW JERSEY

Racial differences in end-of-life planning: Why don’t blacks and Latinos prepare for the inevitable?– Rutgers (7/20/12) – Both religious beliefs and cultural attitudes toward receiving support from family members accounted for the gap between white subjects and minorities, said Carr.
Older blacks are more likely to believe that God controls the time and circumstance of someone’s death and that it’s inappropriate to interfere.
“Their thinking is, ‘this is not our decision to mess around with,” Carr said.
For Latinos, the starkest contrast involved entrusting one particular family member with durable power of attorney. Only four percent of Latinos chose a relative to voice decisions for the incapacitated patient. The likely explanation is that if you grew up in a culture that’s close-knit, you make decisions as a family unit, you’re not going to choose one person,’’ she said.
In both black and Latino families, she said, there is evidence that people are more likely to view caring for ill or aging members as the norm, whereas white subjects had a greater fear of “burdening’’ family with their illness.
Because blacks especially have higher rates of illness, shorter life spans and less access to preventive care, it’s especially important for them to discuss what kind of treatment they would want in the event of a terminal illness and what family members’ roles would be, Carr said.
(more)

New Jersey Euthanasia Laws

NEW MEXICO

Doctors, patient challenge New Mexico assisted suicide ban by Diane Carman, healthpolicysolutions.org (7/11/120 – The question before the court in New Mexico is absurdly simple and yet impossibly complex. What is the meaning of “assisting suicide”?
If a terminally-ill patient refuses a ventilator or a feeding tube and the physician yields to that decision, is that assisting suicide? If the patient is in excruciating pain and requests total sedation and no nutrition or fluids, can the doctor be held accountable for his death? What if the patient seeks a prescription from her physician so that when the pain of dying is overwhelming she can seek the ultimate relief on her own?
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Death with Dignity? More like war on New Mexico’s elderly! by Anna Maria Hoffman (7/16/12) – Currently, Doctors Aroop Mangalik and Katherine Morris, along with cancer patient Aja Riggs, are challenging New Mexico’s pro-life ban on assisted suicide in court. They ultimately want to prove that their loophole “aid in dying” argument—giving conscious terminally ill patients lethal medicine to die—is not assisted suicide. In their view, New Mexico’s assisted suicide ban does not take advanced terminal illness treatment into account and does not bar physicians from practicing “aid in dying” procedures. Looks like these plaintiffs are circumventing the state’s law to impose their pro-death will through court.
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NDY quoted in article on New Mexico assisted suicide case by Diane Coleman of Not Dead Yet (7/17/12) – Throughout the 1980’s and across the country, courts repeatedly and unequivocally answered “no” (i.e. no problem) to the first two questions, but Compassion and Choices (C&C) often raises the specter of being hooked to unwanted tubes and forced to endure unwanted medical treatments when advocating for something completely different than the well established right to refuse treatment.  Despite nearly 25 years of widespread public education about using advance directives to refuse unwanted treatment, C&C counts on people to forget these facts and conflate the issues.  C&C is pushing for the term “aid in dying” to include not only refusing treatment, palliative care, and hospice, but also assisted suicide, rolling it all into one focus group tested phrase.
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OREGON

Assisted Dying: Experts Debate Doctor’s Roleby Katie Moisse, abcnews.com( 7/13/12) – Peggy Sutherland was ready to die. The morphine oozing from a pump in her spine was no match for the pain of lung cancer, which had evaded treatment and invaded her ribs.

“She needed so much morphine it would have rendered her basically unconscious,” said Sutherland’s daughter, Julie McMurchie, who lives in Portland, Ore. “She was just kind of done.”

Sutherland, 68, decided to use Oregon’s “Death With Dignity Act,” which allows terminally-ill residents to end their lives after a 15-day requisite waiting period by self-administering a lethal prescription drug.

“Her doctor wrote the prescription and met my husband and me at the pharmacy on the 15th day,” said McMurchie, recalling how her mother “didn’t want to wait,” she said. “Then he came back to the house, and he stayed with us until her heart stopped beating.”

But not all doctors are on board with the law. In the 15 years since Oregon legalized physician-assisted dying, only Washington and Montana have followed suit, a resistance some experts blame on the medical community.
(more)

RHODE  ISLAND

Rhode Island Euthanasia Laws

TEXAS

Houston man charged in wife’s assisted suicide by Philip Caulfield – NY Daily News (7/3/12) – Her husband, Mark Kelly, 47, reported his wife’s death, and admitted to police that he helped her kill herself because the couple was having financial problems.

Kelly was charged with aiding suicide, a state jail felony. He was being held on $2,000 bail and could get up to two years in prison if convicted.

WISCONSIN

Bishops urge against use of Provider Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (7/25/12) – The Roman Catholic bishops of Wisconsin recently expressed concern for “Upholding the Dignity of Human Life” in a statement warning against the use of Physician (or Provider) Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST).
(more)

Wisconsin Bishops warn against POLST end of care document by Jean McCarthy – LifeSiteNews.com (7/26/12) –
In a statement issued yesterday, the Roman Catholic bishops of Wisconsin are warning against the end of life care document called Physician (or Provider) Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST).  The bishops are concerned that use of this document could lead to acts of euthanasia.
(more)

INTERNATIONAL

(News this month from Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, The Netherlands, New Zealand, South Africa, Switzerland, Trinidad, United Kingdom)

AUSTRALIA

Euthanasia debate heating up in Tasmania by Alex Schadenberg, LifeSiteNews 7/2/12 – The euthanasia issue is heating up in Tasmania. The Tasmanian Parliament has debated euthanasia on several occasions and over the years it has had two inquiries into the feasibility of legalizing euthanasia with both enquiries deciding against legalization.

While in Tasmania, the big issue that the people shared with me was the crisis in healthcare that was occurring on the Island.

The Tasmanian people were very concerned that the Greens and Labor leaders are pushing euthanasia again to achieve cost savings in healthcare. Whether this is true or not, it should be noted that when the pressure to cut the cost of healthcare is mixed with euthanasia, that the pressure to die will soon outweigh the will to live.
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Opposition to relentless push for euthanasia legalization in Australia by Jason Rushton, LifeSiteNews.com (7/3/12) – More than 19 bills to legalise euthanasia have been introduced into Australian parliaments since 2002.

In the current South Australian parliament, a voluntary euthanasia bill has been introduced on five separate occasions, the latest one being defeated 22-20 as recently as June 15 of this year.
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Q&A with Alex Schadenberg, Executive Director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, and Labour MP Maryan Street (7/1/12)
Nitschke to establish euthanasia clinic in Tasmania, if euthanasia becomes legal by Alex Schadenberg, executive director Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, National Right to Life News Today (7/4/12) – Today I had the opportunity to speak to members of the Tasmanian parliament about why it is not safe to legalize euthanasia or assisted suicide. In response to a question from a member of the Tasmanian parliament, I reminded them that Philip Nitschke had already promised to establish a euthanasia clinic in Tasmania, if they legalize euthanasia.
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Is it possible to have safe, legal and rare euthanasia?  by Dr. Pravin Thevathasan, National Right to Life News Today (7/4/12) – A recent press release from the British Medical Journal states: “The BMJ supports a call from leading UK medical bodies to stop opposing assisted dying for terminally ill, mentally competent adults. Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying (HPAD) wants the British Medical Association and royal colleges to move their position from opposition to neutrality.”
It was an extraordinary failure of judgement on the part of what is probably the world’s most prestigious medical journal.
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Spreading the anti-euthanasia message down under by Alex Schadenberg, LifeSiteNews.com 7/6/12 – There were more than 400 people who came to the Life Dinner to hear my talk in Melbourne.

Attending the Life Dinner were several political leaders including The Hon Kevin Andrews MP (Liberal) who in 1996, steered through the federal parliament the legislation that overturned the Northern Territories euthanasia legislation.

Hon. Kevin Andrews informed me that politics is not only the art of the possible, but a good plan creates possibilities and can be implemented. The Andrews bill accomplished what was first perceived to be impossible.
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CANADA

Is euthanasia legalized murder? Dutch doctors have gone from fighting death to administering it by Anne McTavish, TroyMedia.com (7/3/12) – Carter v. Canada (Attorney General) is a hard case, and it’s bad law. It’s about people with serious, debilitating, terminal illnesses who want doctors to kill them. It’s not just that they want to die, it’s that they want to die later and to have someone else do it in a way that won’t hurt.

The plaintiffs and Madam Justice Smith focused on the seriously ill people and their situation. I want to focus on the doctors and the rest of us who will be harmed if this decision becomes law.
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Let terminally ill choose: One writer’s eloquence changed my mind about assisted suicide by Naomi Lakritz in The Edmunton Journal (7/3/12) – … that’s not what this is about. We’re not talking about fomenting a Jack Kevorkianlike ghoulishness among physicians. This is not about doctors rushing in with blood lust in their eyes, ready to knock off any patient who gives them the nod – or even a patient who doesn’t. It’s not about doctors making decisions for patients; it’s about patients making decisions for themselves.
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Choosing Death: We have to talk about it in thespec.com, editorial (7/3/12) – Canada is inching closer and closer to a national discussion about assisted suicide. And it’s about time.
In its most recent edition, the Canadian Medical Association Journal is calling for a Canada-wide debate. Circumstances are pushing the nation in that direction: In Quebec, the Dying with Dignity Commission (an all-party group drawn from the National Assembly) recently issued a comprehensive report suggesting, in part, that doctors who help a terminally ill patient die by suicide not be charged criminally. And a judge in the British Columbia Supreme Court in June struck down laws banning doctor-assisted suicide as unconstitutional, ruling on the case of a B.C. woman who has Lou Gehrig’s Disease.
…the very central question is clear: When a person is dying, when their quality of life has deteriorated to the extent that they don’t wish to continue, ought there be some avenue that is not illegal? We don’t need to reinvent the wheel, since other countries including Switzerland, the Netherlands and Belgium have euthanasia social policy.
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Where’s our right to die? by Santiago Wills, Salon (7/3/12) – …according to Howard Ball, a professor emeritus of political science at the University of Vermont, the legalization of physician-assisted death is a gesture of human compassion. As he details in his new book, “At Liberty to Die: The Battle for Death With Dignity in America,” the issue goes to the heart of bigger questions about the American soul — from the meaning of personal liberty to the importance of constitutional law.
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Another View: Let’s talk about assisted suicide in TheRecord.com (7/4/12) – In its most recent edition, the Canadian Medical Association Journal is calling for a Canada-wide debate. Circumstances are pushing the nation in that direction: In Quebec, the Dying with Dignity Commission (an all-party group drawn from the National Assembly) recently issued a comprehensive report suggesting, in part, that doctors who help a terminally ill patient die by suicide not be charged criminally. And a judge in the British Columbia Supreme Court in June struck down laws banning doctor-assisted suicide as unconstitutional, ruling on the case of a B.C. woman who has Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

The CMAJ editorial, provocatively headlined “Are we ready to perform therapeutic homicide?” makes the point that this is not a debate for courtrooms, lawyers and judges, but rather for average Canadians and their elected proxies in Parliament.

There’s the rub. The Harper government does not want this debate.
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Now’s the time to stand against euthanasia urges Canadian bishops’ group by Patrick B. Craine, LifeSiteNews.com (7/9/12) – “It is time to stand up and speak!” insists the Catholic Organization for Life and Family (COLF).

In a new reflection, the organization, which was co-founded by the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops and the Knights of Columbus, is calling on Catholics and people of good will to engage the debate on end-of-life issues. The plea comes in the wake of a British Columbia judge’s ruling that legalizes euthanasia and assisted suicide and the recent Quebec government report calling for “medical assistance in dying.”
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How about the right to cry for help? court ruling asserting a person’s right to assisted suicide reflects discriminatory attitudes toward the disabled – by Amy E. Hasbrouck, chair of Not Dead Yet, an international organization of people with disabilities who oppose the legalization of euthanasia and assisted suicide in The Gazette (7/9/12) – The long and the short of the reasons for judgment issued by Justice Lynn Smith is that legal provisions in Canada prohibiting assisted suicide law are unconstitutional because they impede disabled people’s rights to life, liberty and security of the person.

The judge believes that having a disability or degenerative illness is a rational reason to want to die, and that those of us with disabilities should be helped to die if we can’t do it neatly or efficiently ourselves.

The B.C. Supreme Court has chosen not to listen very closely to disability-rights advocates with more than 20 years of experience battling discrimination; instead, the court relied on the stories of people who have accepted the view that disability is undignified, and that people with disabilities should be given a streamlined path to death whenever they want it and however they want it.

Justice Smith assumes that, because it’s no longer illegal, suicide is somehow an affirmative right; and if you can’t do it the way you want to do it, then you should have the right to have someone do it for you.
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Churchgoers more likely to support euthanasia: Survey sunnewsnetwork.ca (7/10/12) – A new survey has found Protestant churchgoers are more likely to support doctor-assisted suicide in controlled situations than Canadians at large.
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Assisted-suicide ruling to be appealed by Ottawa – Civil-liberties lawyer calls move ‘perplexing’ in case of terminally ill B.C. woman- CBC News (7/13/12) – The federal government will appeal last month’s ruling by the British Columbia Supreme Court that partially struck down Canada’s ban on assisted suicide, Justice Minister Rob Nicholson says.
The ruling declared that the Criminal Code section targeting anyone who “aids or abets a person to commit suicide” should not apply to physicians in cases where terminally ill patients request to die.

Judge Lynn Smith halted her decision for a year to give Parliament a chance to rewrite the law, which she deemed unconstitutional because it unfairly deprives people with degenerative illnesses of their liberty, and because it discriminates against those with a physical disability who might need assistance to exercise their right to take their own life.

But she also granted an immediate exemption for Gloria Taylor, one of the women who brought the suit, and her doctor.
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Update: Government of Canada Condemns Gloria Taylor to a Slow Death by Cathryn Wellner (7/13/12) – On Friday the 13th, the Conservative government of Canada dealt Gloria Taylor a cruel blow. Justice Minister Rob Nicholson announced his government will appeal the ruling that would have allowed her to die with dignity.
A month earlier the Supreme Court of British Columbia granted the 64-year-old woman, who suffers from ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis or Lou Gehrig’s disease), the right to request the assistance of her doctor if she wished to end her life.
(more)

Conservative Government to appeal assisted suicide ruling after B.C.Supreme Court strikes down ban – National Post (7/13/12) – The landmark ruling last month said the ban is unconstitutional and gave Ottawa a year to rewrite it. Judge Lynn Smith also granted an immediate exemption to the law, allowing Gloria Taylor, one of the women who brought the lawsuit, to die with a doctor’s help.

In a statement, Nicholson said the government intends to seek a stay on all aspects of the ruling, including the exemption for Taylor, while it goes to the British Columbia Court of Appeal.
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It’s time for a national debate on assisted suicide– The Gazette (7/16/12) – Call it what you will – assisted suicide, euthanasia or therapeutic homicide – it is an issue that politicians are reluctant to engage, but one which is not going away.

Last month, a British Columbia Supreme Court judge ruled that Canada’s ban on assisted suicide is unconstitutional on grounds that it violates two sections of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms concerning the right to equality, and the right to life, liberty and security of the person.

The ruling did not strike down the law, but rather ordered the federal government to amend the provisions of the Criminal Code that currently make it an offence to counsel or assist someone to commit suicide. It did, however, extend an exemption for a plaintiff in the case, a 64-year-old B.C. woman suffering from Lou Gehrig’s disease (or ALS) to die with a doctor’s assistance.
(m0re)

Who decides how we die? – Edmunton Journal (7/16/12) – Why has Justice Minister Rob Nicholson appealed the B.C. ruling that struck down the law that makes physician-assisted death illegal in Canada? By refusing to allow Gloria Taylor, who is dying from Lou Gehrig’s disease, the right to a doctor-assisted death, Nicholson is committing her to a painful death. That is not justice. It’s unnecessary cruelty.
Nicholson states the laws surrounding euthanasia and assisted suicide exist to protect all Canadians, including the most vulnerable such as the sick, the elderly and people with disabilities. B.C. Supreme Court Justice Lynn Smith agreed, but after sifting through mountains of evidence concluded that in countries allowing medically assisted dying, there is no threat to these groups. Nicholson is ignoring this evidence.
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Assisted-suicide slope not so slipperyby Arthur Schafer, WinnepegFreePress.com (7/19/12) – Gloria Taylor, a British Columbia ALS patient, insists it should be up to her to decide when the prospect of continued life is worse than the prospect of hastened death. Once she reaches that point, however, she may no longer be physically able to end her own life. So, she claims, it is her right to seek assistance in dying from a willing physician.

“What I want is to be able to die in a manner that is consistent with the way that I lived my life. I want to be able to exercise control and die with dignity and with my sense of self and personal integrity intact,” she has explained. “I want to be able to experience my death as part of my life and part of my expression of that life. I do not want the manner of my death to undermine the values that I lived my life in accordance with…”

A great majority of Canadians supports Taylor’s position. Similar support existed 19 years ago for Sue Rodriguez, another ALS patient who took her case all the way to the Supreme Court. Rodriguez lost, but only very narrowly, by a five-to-four vote.

Despite strong public support for decriminalization of physician-assisted suicide, it remains illegal in Canada. Attempting suicide ceased to be a crime in 1974; but aiding someone to commit suicide remains an offence punishable by up to 14 years in prison. The voluntary request of the patient — even when she is a competent adult, rational and fully informed — is no defence.

In a dramatic decision, however, the British Columbia Supreme Court has ruled it is Taylor’s constitutional right to decide for herself whether she wants a physician to assist her to die. The federal government is appealing this decision. Ultimately, the Supreme Court of Canada will have to rule.
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It’s expensive to support the disabled– suicide kits are $39.95by Rhonda Wiebe (7/21/12) – Arthur Schafer’s portrayal of comments on the merits of physician-assisted suicide need challenging (Assisted-suicide slope not so slippery, July 19). Schafer, like many supporters of physician-assisted suicide (also known as “doctor-prescribed death”), does not seem to have considered the wider issues facing Canadians with disabilities, including the ongoing social prejudice and discouraging lack of living supports that we encounter on a daily basis.

The recent decision in the British Columbia Supreme Court regarding the constitutional right of Gloria Taylor, an ALS patient, to end her own life rather than live with disability only confirms what we with disabilities already know — that many Canadians believe it is better to be dead than disabled. What also became clear in the decision is that the judge believes it is better to be dead than disabled. The judgment was pronounced without considering the message it sends to all of us who believe that despite profound functional limitations, we want to live.
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Our right to die – cottagecountrynow.ca (7/20/12) – Last week the Canadian government announced plans to appeal a British Columbia court decision allowing doctor assisted suicide.
Last month, the British Columbia Supreme Court struck down a ban on doctor assisted suicide, but granted a one-year stay to give Parliament time to rewrite the law. There was an exception to the stay, though, that allowed applicant Gloria Taylor, who has ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease, to end her life when she sees fit with the help of a doctor.
The government’s decision to appeal the ruling is questionable.
Anyone at death’s door should have a right to die when and how they see fit. According to Section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights : “Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice.”
Not everyone agrees with interpretations of the section that it includes allowing a terminally ill person to die with medical help, but it’s a worthwhile interpretation.
A person of sound mind, who is suffering from an ever-worsening debilitating condition should have the option of choosing a humane death, not constant pain with no quality of life. That’s not living.
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Medical Nightmare: Doctors won’t let wife act on behalf of ailing husband by Peter Baklinski  – LifeSiteNews.com (7/20/12) – An Ontario woman is crying foul after a team of doctors effectively denied the woman her legal right to act on behalf of her husband who was hospitalized after a stroke. The woman is fighting to regain control of her husband’s medical treatment.

Marilyn met with her husband’s team of doctors who not only refused to change his drug regimen, but threatened that if she did not comply with the drug plan, she would loose her legal power of attorney over her husband.

“Not only did the meds not get changed, but I was threatened over and over,” she said.

One doctor allegedly told Marilyn: “One of us has to go, and it’s going to be you.”

“I was just telling them the truth as I knew it, hoping that they would change the meds, but it didn’t happen that way,” she said. “They have never honored my legal power of attorney.”

She alleges that doctors were responsible for bringing her before the Consent and Capacity Board so that she could be deemed “incapacitated” to represent her husband.

“They’ve put him on palliative care against the wishes of the family,” she said, adding that he is not receiving adequate hydration.

Not only this, but Marilyn says that she was barred from visiting her husband in December, but has since regained permission to visit under supervision.

“Putting this in perspective, if doctors are already imposing decision on patients as ‘medical treatment,’ how long does it take before they start imposing euthanasia and assisted suicide on patients as a form of ‘medical treatment’?” Alex Schadenberg, director of Canada’s Euthanasia Prevention Coalition asked.

Schadenberg pointed out that many doctors would not proscribe such treatment, but added that “there will always be some who will abuse the power that they have been given to take lives.”
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Ask the religion experts: Does the renewed debate on doctor assisted suicide say anything about the sanctity of life in modern times? – The Ottawa Citizen (7/21/12) – Cases in which there may or may not be doctor-assisted suicide are anything but abstract. This means discussions about this matter need to be undertaken within the wider context of the Canadian health-care system. For that matter, it cannot be addressed through law or medicine alone. We need broad reflection on the experience of death and dying.
Requests for doctor-assisted suicide appear to be signs of the failure of human community. It is difficult, if not impossible, to regard life as sacred if we have no assurance that we will be supported in all circumstances. We need to be certain that we will not be forced to endure dehumanizing medical procedures. We need confidence that we will not be abandoned in our suffering. With all the financial strains that our health-care system is facing, terminally ill people need to know that assisted suicide is not being promoted because it is actually cheaper than good palliative care.
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Dying in Court by Peter Singer – Aljazeera.com (7/21/12) – A Canadian’s fight for the right to die could provide an international precedent in the case for assisted suicide.
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Appeal is cruel by John Warren – Calgary Herald (7/21/12) – By refusing to allow Gloria Taylor, who is dying from Lou Gehrig’s disease, the right to a doctor-assisted death, he is committing her to a painful death.
That is not justice. It’s unnecessary cruelty.
(more)

Medically assisted suicide: Compassionate or criminal?– The Vancouver Sun (7/23/12) – Striking down laws against assisted suicide and euthanasia puts lives at risk and is likely to lead to the untimely deaths of vulnerable people whether they choose it or not.

Those who insist it should be legal out of respect for personal autonomy, so individuals have the free choice, don’t realize that legalizing it may have the opposite effect.
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Depression, not pain, main reason patients request euthanasia by Anne McTavish – Troy Media (7/24/12) – Yet again, our courts have been asked to change the law and allow doctors to actively end a person’s life (euthanasia) or to provide a patient with the drugs to kill themself (physician-assisted suicide, or PAS).
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BMA doctors argue assisted suicide is ‘never justified’ as they vote against euthanasiaby Claire Bates, Anglican Mainstream (7/28/12) – Doctors have reiterated their opposition to assisted dying at the British Medical Association’s conference today.

Campaigners wanted delegates to agree to take a neutral stance on the issue, but members of the BMA voted against this proposal. One delegate argued that killing patients was ‘never justified’ likening it to murder.

The Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying (HPAD) had called for the BMA to move its position from opposition to ‘studied’ neutrality.
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CHINA

10-year old American boy receives euthanasia – news.xinhuanet.com (7/23/12) – photo journey of the family with a 10-year old American boy diagnosed with neuroblastoma who goes through two years of treatments then chooses euthanasia to make his transition

FRANCE

President launches euthanasia debate – The Connexion (7/18/12) – PRESIDENT Hollande has reignited debate on euthanasia, saying he wants to “go further” than the existing “Leonetti Law” on the end of life, which rules it out. Visiting a hospice in the Hauts-de-Seine, the president said he wants to put in place a reform of care for the terminally ill in the “coming months,” possibly allowing for a form of assisted dying.
He has charged the president of a national medical ethics committee, Prof Didier Sicard, with running consultations around the country to feed into reforms.
However euthanasia pressure group the Association Pour le Droit de Mourir dans la Dignité, says the professor has a Catholic bias to his views.
(more)

GERMANY

Assisted Suicide: Germany loses Strasbourg case – BBC News Europe (7/19/12) – After suffering a bad fall in 2002 Mr Koch’s wife needed artificial ventilation and constant nursing care. She wanted to end her life, but Germany’s Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices refused to let her do so with sodium pentobarbital.
Mr Koch’s challenges on her behalf got nowhere in Germany as the courts cited the existing ban on active assisted suicide.
The Dignitas facility in Switzerland later enabled Mrs Koch to die.

European court rules on euthanasia debate – Deutsche Welle (7/19/12) – The European Court of Human Rights issued a decision Thursday on whether states may refuse to assist in a suicide. Germany’s laws on assisted suicide draw a fine line between what’s permitted, and what’s not. Questions remain.
(more)

Strasbourg hits euthanasia ball back into German courts – Deutsche Welle (7/19/12) – The European Court of Human Rights has ruled that it’s up to individual countries to decide on euthanasia. It also decided, however, that the German courts should not have thrown out a widower’s appeals.
(more)

INDIA

Government not in favor of euthanasia– The Times of India (7/28/12) – The minister said the law of the land prohibited active euthanasia and the Supreme Court had laid out guidelines for passive euthanasia. “In this situation, there’s no need for us to recommend anything. We feel our effort should be to help a person live, whatever be the situation. It’s about compassion and service.”

However, members were divided over the issue. Referring to the case of HD Karibasamma, a teacher in Davanagere who is seeking euthanasia due to health problems, Shivayogi Swamy said: “It’s torture for the patient and family members. It’s like death every minute. Moreover, such cases have financial implications. Several countries have legalized euthanasia. We should pass a resolution and send it to the Centre.”
(more)

THE NETHERLANDS

Thousands in Netherlands die without consent since euthanasia OK by Steven Ertelt, lifenews.com  (7/4/12) – Alex Schadenberg, the executive director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, has a message for Canadians: contact federal Justice Minister Rob Nicholson now, and urge him to appeal the recent decision by Justice Lynn Smith in British Columbia striking down Canada’s laws on assisted suicide. (video)

Legalising assisted dying ‘doesn’t lead to more opting death’by Stephen Adams, The Telegraph (7/11/12) –

The study, published in The Lancet, found rates before and after legalisation in 2002 were comparable.

The figures have been leapt upon by advocates of a change in the law here, who say they show there would be no “slippery slope” towards more people choosing assisted dying.

But opponents warn it shows there has been a big rise in the use of methods that border on assisted dying, such as continuous deep sedation.

In 2002 The Netherlands became the first country in the world to legalise assisted dying, although it had been tolerated since the 1970s. The rules only cover patients with an incurable condition who face unbearable suffering.

The Dutch academics found that between 1990 and 2001 the rate of euthanasia and assisted suicide cases rose from 1.9 to 2.8 per cent of all deaths.
(more)

Dutch euthanasia figures present muddled picture by Michael Cook, BioEdge (7/14/12) – It is true that there is a “V” shaped curve in the number of cases of voluntary euthanasia. In 2001, before legalisation, about 2.6% of all deaths were due to voluntary euthanasia. In 2005, this dropped to 1.7%, and rose in 2010 back up to 2.8%.
But what accounts for the drop? It was not lack of interest. The proportion of patients requesting euthanasia rose from 4.8% of all patient deaths in 2005 to 6.7% in 2010. And doctors were also more willing to grant it. In 2005, 37% of these requests were granted and in 2010 45%.
(more)

Doubts emerge about Dutch guidelines for terminal sedation by Michael Cook (7/20/12) – Should deep, continuous sedation at the end of life really be treated as normal medical practice in the Netherlands, ask three Dutch authors in the Journal of Medical Ethics. Although they do not appear to oppose euthanasia, they argue that “morally problematic aspects inherent to palliative sedation do not get the attention they deserve” under current guidelines. Since palliative sedation accounted for more than 12% of deaths in the Netherlands in 2010, this is an important issue.

Although euthanasia – which ends a patient’s life immediately – is the most visible and controversial aspect of end-of-life care for international observers, the innocuous-sounding treatment called “palliative sedation” (also called “terminal sedation” by some authors) also has been the centre of controversy in the Netherlands. In 2003, the then-attorney-general argued that the death of a deeply sedated patient because water was withheld was culpable homicide. However, his view did not prevail.
(more)

The Lancet proves euthanasia deaths are rising in The Netherlands by Alex Schadenberg, Executive Director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition (7/17/12) – The long awaited 2010 nationwide examination of the euthanasia law in the Netherlands was published in The Lancet on July 11, 2012. The study found that:

* the number of euthanasia deaths has grown significantly since 2005 (4050 in 2010, 2425 in 2005)

* the under-reporting of euthanasia in the Netherlands has grown since 2005 (23% in 2010, 20% in 2005)

* there is a growth in deaths by terminal sedation (12.3% in 2010, 8.2% in 2005)

* the percentage of requests for euthanasia being fulfilled has increased (45% in 2010, 37% in 2005)

* the number of deaths without request or consent has decreased (300 in 2010, 550 in 2005)

The media decided to ignore the significant growth in the number of euthanasia deaths since 2005, by reporting that the current percentage of euthanasia deaths in the Netherlands is similar to the percentage of euthanasia deaths in 2001, before it was officially legalized.

NEW ZEALAND

Panel discusses the euthanasia debate in New Zealand – TVNZ (7/1/12) -interview with Auckland Chamber of Commerce Chief Executive, Massey University Vice-Chancellor, Political Scientist and a cancer patient

Will assisted death be made legal by Noel Cheer, BusinessScoop (7/9/12) – Will Assisted Death be made legal? With Maryan Street’s Private Member’s Bill waiting to be balloted, the “voluntary euthanasia” debate has effectively been re-opened. The insistence that “I own my body” has lead to the claim that …Will Assisted Death be made legal?

With Maryan Street’s Private Member’s Bill waiting to be balloted, the “voluntary euthanasia” debate has effectively been re-opened.
(more)

Euthanasia may again test our politiciansby Katie Bradford-Crozier – newstalkzb.co.nz (7/24/12) – The controversial topic of euthanasia could once again be about to test our politicians.

Labour’s Maryan Street is submitting a Bill to the Members’ ballot that would see euthanasia decriminalised.

There’d be strict conditions, such as two separate medical practitioners having to deem the person concerned is of sound mind, has a terminal illness and hasn’t been coerced in any way.

Ms Street is hoping recent high profile cases will make MPs realise the time is right to take another look at the issue.
(more)

Euthanasis law would ‘force doctors to lie’by Natasha Burling – newstalkzb.co.nz (7/27/12) –

A doctor who cares for dying people says the introduction of a law legalising euthanasia would force doctors to lie.

A Bill decriminalising the practice has been put in the member’s ballot by Labour MP Maryan Street.

Capital and Coast palliative medicine consultant Dr Sinead Donnelly says if it was passed, it would be a disaster for society.

She says under the Bill, doctors would have to say the person’s underlying illness was the cause of death, not the lethal injection.

“And in this legislation they want the doctor to lie, to tell a lie, in addition to killing the patient, or to giving the patient, the person, the injection that killed them.”

Dr Donnelly says the legislation is incredibly poor and is shocked by it.
(more)

Man pleads guilty to assisting suicide by Anna Cross newstalkzb.co.nz (5/4/12) – Lesley Martin helped her ill mother die and says people are determined to have a peaceful and dignified death, so they take matters into their own hands.
She says it happens far more than what’s reported.”There is a well established euthanasia underground accessed in any country where legislation isn’t in place for people to access medically assisted dying openly and honestly.”

Euthanasia backers cite fear of burdening others by Bronwyn Torrie (7/27/12) – Healthy pro-euthanasia pensioners would rather cut their lives short than be a financial drain on society, a study shows.
Auckland University researchers interviewed 11 healthy men and women aged between 69 and 89 on why they supported voluntary euthanasia.

Reasons included not wanting to be a burden on their families and healthcare resources and fears of losing their independence and dignity.

“If you couldn’t do your basic care, couldn’t wash yourself or go to the loo by yourself, I don’t want to go on after that,” an 86-year-old woman said.

“And I don’t expect [my husband] wants me to go on like that either, or my family.”

Being remembered in “a good way”, not as a shadow of their former selves, was also important. Many had watched a loved one die and did not want to be in a position where they could not make decisions for themselves.
(more)

SOUTH AFRICA

Death is inevitable, pain is optional by Thalia Randall – Mail&Guardian (7/6/12) – Some believe that proper palliative care goes a long way towards countering arguments for euthanasia.
(more)

South Africa Doctors ‘Secretly Help People Die’– News24.com (7/12/12) – South Africa should legalise euthanasia as many doctors are already secretly helping elderly patients to die, Western Cape University Prof Sean Davison said on Thursday.

“Many doctors have said to me privately that they’ve helped people to die… at their request. It’s the choice of the doctor [though]… and they have to do it behind the scenes illegally,” he said.

With no choice whether to die or not, critically ill patients had to rely on the graciousness of their doctor.

“If you don’t have a law change, you might be playing Lotto with your doctor.”
(more)

SWITZERLAND

Canton votes for assisted suicide– thetablet.com (6/29/12) – Churches in the Swiss canton of Vaud have condemned a move that will permit assisted suicide in nursing homes and hospitals in the canton.

On 17 June, almost two-thirds of voters (62 per cent) in the canton voted in a legally binding referendum in favour of a proposal that would oblige nursing homes and hospitals to allow assisted suicide, provided the person who wishes it is suffering from an incurable illness or injury and is of sound mind.

Local Bishop Charles Morerod of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg, said the consequences of the decision were “terrible”.

Finding a place for assisted suicide in society by Clare O’Dea, swissinfo.ch (7/9/12) – The two main Swiss assisted suicide organisations – Exit and Dignitas – made it possible for 560 people to end their lives in 2011. This equates to one in three of all suicides in Switzerland.

While the right to die is consistently backed by a majority of the electorate, there are details within the practice of assisted suicide that split opinion, such as the vote in canton Vaud last month over exercising the right to die in a residential care home.

Voters in the French-speaking canton accepted the local government’s proposal to oblige nursing homes and hospitals to accept the practice only when the person in question is suffering from an incurable illness or injury.
(more)

Swiss voters OK assisted suicide in nursing home by Charlie Butts, onenewsnow.com (7/9/12) – The majority vote in the canton of Vaud was 62 percent in favor of bringing assisted suicide into the nursing homes. Rita Marker of the Patients Rights Council tells OneNewsNow the vote forces hospitals and nursing homes to accept assisted suicide.
(more)

Legalization of Euthanasia has not altered prevalence – PriMed Journal (7/11/12) – “In conclusion, eight years after the enactment of the Dutch euthanasia law, the incidence of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide is comparable with that in the period before the law,” the authors write.

TRINIDAD

Death with Dignity by Leonard Bernstein, Trinidad Express Newspapers  (7/30/12) – The “playing God” argument is a non-starter. For those who do not believe in a personal, vengeful God, it is meaningless. For those who do (as noted by Peter Singer), “God” allows them to make choices about these matters as about all others in their lives. Religious authorities not only feel that they have the right to set what they consider the moral and ethical parameters, but that their view should prevail for all members of society no matter the individual circumstances of, say, someone’s possibly painful imminent death. However, many others take issue with their edicts and want the autonomy to decide for themselves.
(more)

UNITED KINGDOM

BMA continues to oppose legalizing assisted dying – bma.org (6/27/12) – Doctors and medical students decided to maintain their opposition to legalising assisted dying.
The meeting decided not to move to a position of neutrality and also rejected a call to say that assisted dying was a matter for society and not for the medical profession.
Retired Manchester consultant in geriatric medicine Raymond Tallis spoke in favour of changing the BMA stance.
He emphasised that ‘neutrality did not imply indifference’ and ‘the medical profession must retain a central role in ensuring and defining safeguards’.
Professor Tallis said guidelines made it clear that doctors and nurses who helped with assisted dying will currently be prosecuted.
‘Assistance is therefore delegated to amateurs, who have to take on a dreadful responsibility at a time when they are already greatly distressed and may well be incompetent to carry it out,’ he said.
(more)

Assisted death or assisted living by Jill Shaw Ruddock – huffingtonpost – (7/3/12) – This week in the UK there is a renewed push by MPs to review the current guidelines regarding assisted suicide on compassionate grounds. Lord Falconer, who heads up The Commission on Assisted Dying reported that the current legal status is inadequate and incoherent. Understandably there are concerns that the elderly could be vulnerable to those who don’t have their best interests at heart.
(more)

Promoting caring, not killing by Ruth Bessant, Christian Today (7/2/12) – We are currently seeing a great deal of pressure applied by those wanting to change the law on assisted suicide with increasing discussion about whether care of the dying should include the option for a person to choose to end their own life with medical assistance, so-called physician-assisted suicide (PAS).
(more)

Patients dying in hospital in pain and lacking dignity: survey by Rebecca Smitg, Medical Editor, The Telegraph (7/3/12) – The survey, by the Office of National Statistics, found that half of families said hospital nurses did not always treat their dying family member with respect.
Almost a third said the quality of care in hospital was fair or poor and only 35 per cent of families rated pain relief in hospital in the final two days as excellent.
Hospital care was rated worse than that received by patients dying at home, in a care home or in a hospice on almost all of the 59 questions.
It is the first time such a survey has been conducted and responses were received from more than 22,000 families.
(more)

Solutions for our care crisis – Letters to guardian.co.uk (7/2/12)
Report on rally and mass lobby of Parliament to resist euthanasia – Christian Concern 7/4/12 – On 3 June, campaign group Care Not Killing, of which Christian Concern is a member, held a rally and mass lobby of Parliament in order to promote better palliative care and oppose the legalisation of assisted suicide and euthanasia.

Their speeches contained a range of arguments against weakening the current laws on assisted suicide and euthanasia.

Delegates later went to Parliament to talk to their MPs about the issues and highlight their opposition to any relaxation of the current laws.
(more)

The legalization of assisted suicide– don’t be fooled, it is primarily about money by Dr. Peter Saunders, CEO of Christian Medical Fellowship – National Right to Life News Today (7/4/12) –

Today, according to the Sunday Times, Lord Falconer will publish his new bill on assisted suicide.

In line with the recommendations of his sham ‘Commission on Assisted Dying’ he will push for doctors being given the power to help mentally competent adults with less than one year to live to kill themselves.

There has been surprisingly little media coverage about this event, but Dignity in Dying (the former Voluntary Euthanasia Society) are planning a mass lobby on Parliament tomorrow to launch an ‘enquiry’ into this new bill which they hope will be debated in the New Year.

Over the last six years there have been three failed attempts to legalise assisted suicide in Britain since 2006 all of which have failed due to concerns about public safety.

Right-to-Die groups in England increase lobbying efforts – by Myles Collier, Christian Post (7/5/12) – There is considerable attention being brought to assisted suicide and euthanasia in England recently. Several groups in favor of changing laws concerned with such acts have increased their lobbying of members of the British Parliament.

Dr. Peters Saunders, regarded as the leading advocate of right-to-life supporters, has cautioned that there will be an increase in the level of activity by those individuals and organizations that are pushing for new laws for those who wish to end their lives.

“Their glossy propaganda inserts are spilling out of commercial publications; they are spending hundreds of thousands; and clearly believe this is their year,” Saunders told the Christian Institute.
(more)

Draft Assisted Dying Bill is an important step towards a compassionate law on assisted dying– British Humanist Assoc. (7/4/12) – The All Party Parliamentary Group on Choice at the End of Life has launched a consultation on a draft Bill that would enable mentally competent adults with a terminal condition to seek medical assistance to end their life. The consultation has been welcomed by the British Humanist Association (BHA) as an ‘important step towards an ethical and compassionate law on assisted dying that protects the vulnerable’.

The draft Bill largely draws upon the recommendations of the independent Commission on Assisted Dying, which examined the problematic approach to the issue of assisted dying in the UK. At present, assisting another individual to die remains illegal, however the Director of Public Prosecution’s revised prosecuting guidelines recommend that amateur assistance for compassionate reasons should not be prosecuted, and large numbers seek assistance abroad. As a result, assistance continues to occur, but outside of a legal framework of safeguards that protect the vulnerable.
(more)

Support of doctor-assisted suicide by Bonnie Gardiner – YouGov.co.uk – (7/5/12) – 69% Britons say law should allow doctors to assist terminally ill to die; 46% if illness not terminal

Over two thirds of the British public have expressed support for the laws on assisted suicide to be changed so that it would be legal for doctors to assist in ending the life of someone suffering a terminal illness, our poll shows.

Support is not as strong for the aided death of patients whose illness is painful and incurable but not terminal, with around half in favour and one third opposed.
(more)

Why legalizing assisted suicide for anyone at all will inevitably lead to incremental extension by Peter Saunders – LifeSiteNews.com (7/6/12) – Pro-euthanasia activists always make a great play of how their proposals to help people kill themselves are extremely modest and are bound by ‘robust safeguards’.

Dignity in Dying, the former Voluntary Euthanasia Society, is a world leader in this art and their new draft bill, championed by Lord Falconer, is a classic example.

It’s only for the mentally competent, only for the terminally ill, only for adults they say.

There will be no killing of children, disabled people or demented people. It’s all going to be strictly controlled.

In fact it is only the beginning for two main reasons.
(more)

Euthanasia could be better than costly social care – pensioner – thisisgloucertershire.co.uk (7/10/12) – “The big question is: Who is going to pay for it?

“I often think that pensioners want to live in dignity and die in it too, and to that end one has to think about euthanasia.

“A lot of the success of this will rest on how much the social care will cost everybody, because a lot of people think the Government has limitless amounts of money, but it does not.”

In an announcement tomorrow, the Government is due to announce a new policy of national eligibility for free social care by 2015.
(more)

Former nurse urges Golders Green MP to back assisted suicide bill by Syma Mohammed, Ham&High (7/13/12) – A former nurse who was awarded an OBE for services to palliative care, is supporting a bill to allow terminally ill patients to have an assisted death.

Harriet Copperman, 67, of Diploma Avenue, East Finchley, lobbied her MP Mike Freer on Wednesday of last week after a draft bill was launched the day before.

Until this year, she was on the steering group of Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying (HPAD), an action group which supports the bill.

Ms Copperman said: “I spent all my time in care not being in favour of assisted dying.

“While palliative care can help a small population of people, I have come to appreciate assisted dying can be a part of palliative care.”
(more)

Legalising mercy killing could pressure the elderly into dying early, claims the writer PD James by Richard Alleyne – thetelegraph.co.uk (7/15/12) – James, who admits she herself fears a painful and undignified death, said that while a person should be allowed to choose to commit suicide if their life was “intolerable”, she was “less assured” by the idea of allowing others to do it for them.
She said that murder has to remain a “unique crime” and it would be dangerous to water it down by allowing euthanasia.
(more)

Breast Cancer Discussion Boards: A place to talk about death and dying issues

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Assisted Death Debate – News from June 2012

End-of-Life discussions about Assisted Dying/Suicide/Euthanasia in news articles, blogs, videos from the left, right and center during the month of June 2012. This is a place to find out what’s being talked about around the world as we sort out this highly emotional and controversial issue.

Become informed, open your mind,  join in the discussions. Our leaders need to know what people are thinking and we need to know what our leaders are considering in terms of laws. These are conversations we all need to have!

Happening in June

Swiss canton to vote on assisted suicide on June 17

Judges in UK High Court will hear two cases of locked-in syndrome hoping to change the law June 19-22

UK doctors planning to strike June 21

Annual Representative Meeting of the British Medical Association June 24-28

June 28-30 National Right to Life Convention topics: Medical Ethics 

-“Assisting Suicide – Latest Developments and Best Arguments” to counter “Whose life is it anyway?” and “Why would you force anybody to live like that?”
-Replacing Obamacare: A Detailed Pro-Life Counterproposal
-“Is Doctor Prescribed Death Coming to Your State Next?” or how to stop assisted suicide in its tracks.
-“POLST, MOLST and Similar Forms: What Should Be the Pro-Life Response”
-“Involuntary Denial of Treatment by Doctors and Hospitals: A New Approach to Protect Patients”
-“Defending the Rights of the Disabled and Vulnerable: A Tribute to Brother Michael”  (Terri Schiavo Life and Hope Network)
-“Terri’s Legacy: Building a Network that Will Save Lives” (Terri Schiavo Life and Hope Network)
-“Dying of Thirst! Medicine’s Intentional Killing Through Dehydration, and How to Protect the Vulnerable”
-“Death Panels Already a Reality in Texas” “Futile care law” allows hospital ethics committees to deny lifesaving treatment including but not limited to ventilators, feeding tubes, and antibiotics to patients whose quality of life is deemed to be “insufficient.”
-“Deadly Compassion: A Nurse and Patient Discuss Euthanasia”

BLOGS

Call them ‘Compassion Panels,’ not ‘Death Panels’ by Rev. Dr. Martha R. Jacobs (6/11/12)

The Demise of the Catholic Hospital Brand by Barbara Coombs Lee (6/19/2012)

The Major Myths about Death with Dignity Laws by Melissa Barber (2/27/12)

PD James, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Pope by Eric MacDonald, Choice in Dying: Arguing for the right to die and against religious obstruction of that right (6/6/12)

Finally! A Canadian Ruling in Favor of Assisted Dying! by Eric MacDonald (6/16/12)

The Euthanasia Prevention Coalition: Lies and Misrepresentation by Eric MacDonald (6/19/12)

End-of-Life medical advice: Devaluing patients in name of greater good? by David Shaywitz, Forbes (6/1/12)

Dying With Dignity: It’s your life, your choice (Quebec)

What we weren’t told about Terry Pratchett’s ‘award winning’ euthanasia documentary by Dr. Peter Saunders, CEO Christian Medical Fellowship, National Right to Life News Today (6/12/12)

Living with Dying – This Week in the Movement – Death With Dignity National Center
Euthanasia Prevention Coalition – Alex Schadenberg, Ex. Dir. & Int’l Chair (6/14/12)

PODCAST

Death With Dignity or Murder? – Francesca Bastarache interviews Dr. Marcia Angell

VIDEOS

Right to Die? Assisted suicide in old people’s homes (Switzerland)

Assisted suicide group on trial (6/22/12) – CNN’s Sanjay Gupta follows a case in which the right-to-die group Final Exit Network was involved in the death of a woman who claimed medical conditions she didn’t have.

Supreme Court Attorney Kathryn Tucker about Aid in Dying and its legalities by LivDelicious

How to Die in Hawaii by LivDelicious

“How to Die: What I Learned from the Last Days of My Mom and Dad” by Joe Klein in TIME Magazine. Discussion about fee for service reimbursement causing health care professionals to push for more procedures and tests instead of taking the time to have hard conversations about end-of-life care and following advance health care directives.

BOOKS

The Politics of Death by William M.Kirtley – interviews activists from both sides of the physician-assisted dying movement in Oregon. Over 15 years ago, the state legalized the practice under the 1997 Death with Dignity Act.

Kirtley’s book analyzes how this first-of-its-kind law passed as well as survived several legal challenges from both the local and federal governments as well as the U.S. Supreme Court. “Politics of Death” addresses the core issues surrounding the right to die movement, including patient autonomy, federal interference and medical ethics.

ARTICLES

From an Ethics of Rationing to an Ethics of Waste Avoidance by Howard Brody, MD, PHD – The New England Journal of Medicine (Perspective) – (5/19/12) – Bioethics has long approached cost containment under the heading of “allocation of scarce resources.” Having thus named the nail, bioethics has whacked away at it with the theoretical hammer of distributive justice. But in the United States, ethical debate is now shifting from rationing to the avoidance of waste. This little-noticed shift has important policy implications.
(more)

Daunting questions on our fate by Michael Brannigan, timesunion.com 5/31/12 – Does the case for terminal sedation actually weaken the case against physician-assisted suicide?
Terminal sedation, more clinically referred to as “palliative sedation,” is a legally sanctioned alternative to physician-assisted suicide, a last resort in palliative treatment. It involves inducing and maintaining unconsciousness in a terminally ill patient until the patient dies, and is often accompanied by withholding or withdrawing medical feeding and hydration.
(more)

Mapping Your End-of-Life Choices by Jane E. Brody – The New York Times (6/18/2012) – Robert H. Laws, a retired judge in San Francisco, and his wife, Beatrice, knew it was important to have health care directives in place to help their doctors and their two sons make wise medical decisions should they ever be unable to speak for themselves. With forms from their lawyer, they completed living wills and assigned each other as health care agents.
They dutifully checked off various boxes about not wanting artificial ventilation, tube feeding and the like. But what they did not know was how limiting and confusing those directions could be.
(more)

UNITED STATES

(News from Hawaii, Indiana, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Vermont, Washington)

HAWAII

Death with Dignity – KITV.com (6/8/12) – Compassion & Choices conference

INDIANA

Slippery slopes at life’s end by David Orentlicher, indystar.com (6/14/12) – Ethicists have debated whether aid-in-dying can be morally justified, and a key objection is the risk of the “slippery slope.” There may be a small number of patients for whom aid-in-dying is acceptable, but it would not be possible to limit access only to those people. Once the law permits some people to end their lives with prescription drugs, physicians will wrongly write prescriptions for other patients too. There may be people who are depressed about their illness and should be helped with psychiatric treatment. Or some patients may feel they have a “duty to die” to spare their families the financial and emotional burdens.
(more)

IOWA

Study: Lack of health care linked with death by Mike Wiser, WCFCourier.com 6/21/12 – Three Iowans died each day in 2010 because they didn’t have health insurance to cover medical expenses, according to a report released Wednesday by Families USA.
(more)

MARYLAND

Euthanasia: Putting love over legality by Les Kinsolving, WND.com commentary (6/25/12) – Les Kinsolving cites famed historical figures who favored mercy killing.
In the Old Testament’s first book of Samuel, there is the following historical report on the king of Israel:
“Then said Saul unto his armor bearer: ‘Draw thy sword, and thrust me through therewith, lest these uncircumcised come and thrust me through, and abuse me,’ but his armor bearer would not; for he was sore afraid. Therefore Saul took a sword, and fell upon it.”
(more)

MASSACHUSETTS

Massachusetts Voters Support “Death with Dignity” – Western New England University News (6/5/12) – Sixty percent of voters in Massachusetts said they support allowing terminally ill people to legally obtain medication to end their lives…
(more)

‘Death With Dignity’ in Massachusetts by Greg Pfundstein, National Review Online (6/4/12) – Elevating doctor-prescribed suicide to “treatment” puts patients at risk.
Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, the Libyan convicted of the 1988 bombing of a Pan Am flight over Lockerbie, Scotland, died of prostate cancer on May 20. Nearly three years earlier, on August 20, 2009, Scottish authorities had released him on compassionate grounds so that he could return home to die. At the time, he was thought to have three months to live.

Group, voters challenge Massachusetts assisted suicide measure by Calvin Freiburger, LifeSiteNews.com (6/13/12) – A legal challenge is underway against a proposed initiative that would legalize assisted suicide in Massachusetts.
More than 60 voters filed a challenge before the state Supreme Court on May 17, requesting that the initiative be amended to clarify its language. However, the Court has not held hearings on the request, and the wording is not expected to be changed.

Recognizing authentic compassion by Kathleen Grey, PilotCatholicNews.com (6/15/12) – Massachusetts has never intentionally promoted suicide; so why start now? For those who aren’t familiar with it, physician assisted suicide (PAS) is providing a lethal drug to an individual with a disease that may result in death within six months with the sole purpose of ending his or her life. On Election Day this November, the people of Massachusetts will be given the option to check “no” on the ballot against the so-called “Death with Dignity” Act. Proponents of this law seek to lure people into thinking that it represents an act of compassion and aid in dying, but those who know true love and compassion know that “Love is patient, love is kind… it bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things and endures all things.” (1 Cor 13:4-7, 13)
(more)

Assisted suicide supporters say ballot question will move ahead by Colleen Quuinn, The MetroWest Daily News 6/22/12 – The Boston Archdiocese, the Massachusetts Medical Society, the Massachusetts Family Institute, Massachusetts Citizens for Life, and some advocates for the elderly and disabled, have all indicated plans to mount a vigorous campaign to defeat the proposal, contending it is fraught with the potential for error and could be used to compel older, ill adults to end their lives.
(more)

Assisted suicide advocates, church ballot battle set by John Zaremba, Boston Herald 6/23/12 – Assisted-suicide advocates said they have twice the signatures needed to put a right-to-die question before Bay State voters, but the Catholic Church and other groups are vowing a vigorous fight leading up to the November election.
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NEW MEXICO

Their View: My right to a peaceful death by Aja Riggs – Las Cruces Sun-News (6/12/2012) – Less than a year ago I learned that I have uterine cancer. Since I got this diagnosis, I’ve been thinking, very seriously, about what the end of my life might look like and how I might have some choice in my dying process. It was a dilemma I’d been struggling with: I felt I couldn’t talk about my death with the people closest to me. I was afraid to talk about it with my doctor. I thought if it came to choosing a peaceful death, I would have to do it all by myself to keep from implicating anyone else.
To end that sense of fear and isolation that people have — about one of the most important events in our lives — is why I think aid in dying should be an option for terminally ill patients.

NEW YORK

Daunting questions on our fate, commentary by Michael Brannigan, timesunion.com 5/31/2012 – Does the case for terminal sedation actually weaken the case against physician-assisted suicide?
Terminal sedation, more clinically referred to as “palliative sedation,” is a legally sanctioned alternative to physician-assisted suicide, a last resort in palliative treatment. It involves inducing and maintaining unconsciousness in a terminally ill patient until the patient dies, and is often accompanied by withholding or withdrawing medical feeding and hydration.
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OKLAHOMA

Study links early death, lack of health insurance by Wayne Greene, Tulsa World 6/21/12 – Thousands of American and hundreds of Oklahomans are dying every year because they don’t have health insurance, a study by an advocacy group shows.
(more)

OREGON

Why one woman changed her mind on physician-assisted suicide by Suny Dhillon 6/23/12 – She opposed the state’s famed Death With Dignity Act when it passed in 1994, and three years later voted with those trying to have it repealed.
But over the years, her perspective began to change, she says in a telephone interview. She came to believe that necessary safeguards had been put in place and even the terminally ill who chose not to end their lives benefited from knowing they had the option.
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PENNSYLVANIA

Die the way you want to: Advance care directives should be as routine as driver’s licenses by Dr. Dan Morhaim 6/1/2012 – As an emergency room doctor, I’ve seen this all too often. An ambulance brings in a frail, elderly nursing home patient with shortness of breath, irregular heartbeat and plunging blood pressure. The wasted and contracted limbs indicate years of incapacitation, and the medical record reveals a long history of dementia. As we intensely work to restore stability, probing paper-thin skin for a vein, the patient suddenly goes into cardiac arrest.
Does the patient have an advance directive or a do-not-resuscitate order? No. So the ER team goes into full CPR mode, cracking brittle ribs with each chest compression. If “successful,” the patient will endure pain and confusion that may last for the rest of his or her life, however short or long that may be.
Is this care, or torture? The only ethical and legal way to avoid this scenario is when patients have made their wishes known in advance and appointed someone they trust to make decisions when they are no longer able to.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Woman Killed at Assisted Living Home – wltx.com 6/25/12 – Beaufort County deputies say an 84-year-old woman found dead in a Hilton Head Island assisted living home was likely killed by her husband, who survived a suicide attempt.
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VERMONT

Poll: 72 percent of Vermonters support Death with Dignity bill – Press release 6/6/12 – “This independent poll showing a more than 3:1 margin of support for the Death with Dignity bill is consistent with the polling on this issue over the years,” said Dick Walters, President of Patient Choices at End of Life – Vermont. “Perhaps the most significant finding in this new poll is the small percentage–just 6.9 percent–who said they were unsure about the issue. This result shows that the years of discussion of the issue have ensured that almost everyone is well informed and opinions are well established in favor of passing the bill.”

Legal Assisted Suicide: the Perfect Alibi – True Dignity Vermont: Vermont Citizens Against Assisted Suicide (6/14/12) – Lest we ever be tempted to believe that the Vermont Senate’s defeat of the bill that would have legalized assisted suicide has put the issue to rest, on June 10 the Rutland Herald published a pro-assisted-suicide commentary by a David Carkeet of Middlesex, “How to Debate How We Die”
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Comment & Debate: Untold Harm by Edward Mahoney, Burlington Free Press 6/25/12 – During the recently adjourned legislative session, the Vermont Alliance for Ethical Healthcare played a very active role in the defeat of S.103, “An Act Related to Patient Care at the End of Life.”
(more)

Comment & Debate: Momentum in Montpelier by Dick Walters, Burlington Free Press 6/25/12 – The majority of Vermonters support the death with dignity bill. They can be proud of the progress made in the 2011-12 legislative session toward enactment of this civil right. Grassroots action in support of the bill has helped it gain real momentum in the state capital.
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WASHINGTON

Put real dignity in choice to die by Curtis Johnson, The Spokesman-Review (6/10/12) – I spent some of my final days among the monarch butterflies in Pacific Grove, Calif. Their life cycle dictates that they die there every February. They have no choice.
I too will die soon.  I have rapidly progressing ALS – amyotrophic lateral sclerosis – better known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.  There is no cure, and it is 100 percent fatal. Yet, unlike the monarchs, I have a legal choice as to the timing of my death in Washington. That choice, however, is seriously compromised in my case.
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INTERNATIONAL

(News from Australia, Canada, China, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Russia, Switzerland, United Kingdom)

AUSTRALIA

Who are the vulnerable in the euthanasia debate? by Paul Russel  (Director of Hope: preventing euthanasia & assisted suicide, Vice Chair of the International Euthanasia Prevention Coalition) onlineopinion.com.au (6/1/2012) – This brings me to consider the whole question of vulnerability and the risk of coercion of patients. In terms of euthanasia and assisted suicide this vulnerability is often expressed in relation to those in our community whom we recognise as vulnerable in general terms. I’m thinking of people living with disabilities, the frail aged etc., in other words, those whom society accepts may need additional supports in their pursuit of acceptance, equality and protection from harm.
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Doctors hesitate to prolong their own lives to avoid pain by Adele Horin, The Sydney Morning Herald (6.9.2012) – It is a common refrain from doctors doing the ward rounds in the intensive care unit of any major hospital: ”Please don’t ever let this happen to me.”
Professor Hillman believes many doctors would not put themselves through ”the same hell we often put other patients through”.
Professor Hillman is a speaker at a conference at NSW Parliament House next week on living well and dying well. The conference is organised by the non-profit organisation LifeCircle which helps people caring for loved ones at the end of their life. ”We support people having a good life right to the end with the conversations that will benefit the person dying and those they love,” said Brynnie Goodwill, the chief executive of LifeCircle.
Martin Tattersall, the professor of cancer medicine at the University of Sydney, said: ”I suspect very few doctors would opt for second or third line chemo therapy; my suspicion is that doctors are more likely to prescribe futile therapy than accept it. They’re aware of the statistics.
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Euthanasia doctor fights to save job by Tom Bowden, adelaidenow.com (6/12/12) – EUTHANASIA campaigner Dr Philip Nitschke fears his medical licence is under threat over his involvement with the death of a Victor Harbor woman.
Exit International, a pro-euthanasia organisation founded by Dr Nitschke, right, believes an Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency investigation into the matter has been compromised by Right to Life doctors.
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SA Parliament kills off euthanasia laws for the moment by Daniel Wills, adelaidenow.com.au (6/14/12) – PREMIER Jay Weatherill has backed a failed bid to introduce new euthanasia laws in South Australia.
They were struck down by conservative Liberals and key  members of Labor’s Right faction in State Parliament yesterday.
Independent MP Bob Such said his proposal – which would only apply to people suffering from a terminal illness and where pain could not be relieved – had all the possible safeguards.
It was thrown out 22-20 in a conscience vote.
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Voluntary euthanasia back on Tassie agenda by David Beniuk, The Australian 6/25/12 – TASMANIA won’t find itself a centre of voluntary euthanasia tourism if it becomes the first state to decriminalise the practice, advocates say.
President of Dying With Dignity Tasmania Margaret Sing says a residency requirement in the bill will ensure that a fly-in mentality isn’t allowed to flourish.
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Mercy clinic bid for Tassie by Helen Kempton, themercury.co.au  (7/29/12) – TASMANIA could have Australia’s first mobile medically assisted suicide clinic if the state’s euthanasia laws are changed, as Exit International director Philip Nitschke expects.
It would be modelled on a service which has operated in the Netherlands since March, which received nearly 60 calls in its first two days of operation.
(more)

CANADA

B.C. Supreme Court strikes down ban on physician-assisted suicide by Sunny Dhillon – The Globe and Mail 6/15/2012) – In a decision released Friday, Madam Justice Lynn Smith says the Criminal Code provisions “unjustifiably infringe the equality rights” of the plaintiffs in the case, including Gloria Taylor, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
Joseph Arvay, who represented Ms. Taylor, said that his client cried with relief on hearing the decision. He said that he does not know what her plans are.
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How the End of Life can Intensify Love and Living by Barbara Stuary, Calgary Herald – Last week’s ruling by B.C. Supreme Court Justice Lynn Smith is unfortunate and I suggest that Justice Smith must not understand love.
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BC judge strikes download banning doctor-assisted suicide by Keith Fraser, The Province (6/16/12) – In a landmark ruling, a B.C. judge decided a Westbank woman suffering from ALS should be able to die a doctor-assisted death, and struck down Canada’s law banning the practice.
Gloria Taylor, 64, and several other plaintiffs had argued in court that the criminal law was unconstitutional and that people with serious illnesses should be entitled to take their lives with the help of a physician.
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Baseless concerns about euthanasia by Christopher A. Riddle, assistant professor of Philosophy, Concordia University, Montreal – The Province (3/28/12) – Alex Schadenberg’s argument against the legalizing of euthanasia revolves around a primary concern focused on the increased likelihood of the depressed to request euthanasia. He provides us no reason to believe that this increased likelihood is in and of itself problematic, but takes for granted that permitting depressed individuals to request euthanasia is an undesirable thing.
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Two sides in assisted-suicide debate remain worlds apart by Douglas Todd, Vancouver Sun (6/15/12) – Gloria Taylor doesn’t believe God wants her to suffer unnecessarily from what is commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, a condition that doctors expect will kill her within about three years.
That’s why the once-avid motorcyclist eagerly volunteered to be a plaintiff in the precedent-setting case, which was decided on Friday.
B.C. Supreme Court Justice Lynn Smith ruled that the Criminal Code provisions making physician-assisted death illegal are invalid.
(more)

Should Medically Assisted Suicide Be Legal in Canada? (Providentia: A biased look at psychology in the world – 6/12/12) – As the court challenge continues in British Columbia, the fight for medically assisted suicide is progressing in Quebec.  On March 22 of this year,  a Quebec commission on Dying With Dignity released a report after two years of public hearings on the contentious issue.  The commission heard from thirty-two experts in diverse fields such as law, philosophy, ethics, medicine, and psychology.   They also conducted public hearings and heard evidence from hundreds of individuals and groups and held meetings in Belgium, the Netherlands, and France to examine palliative care systems in other countries.  Finally, the commission received more than 16,000 comments by mail, fax, and email and examined online questionnaire responses from more than 6558 respondents.
(more)

Legalized euthanasia only a breath away by Margaret Somerville, The Globe and Mail (6/16/12) – Striking down, as unconstitutional, the Criminal Code provision prohibiting assisted suicide, as the Gloria Taylor case does, in effect legalizing physician assisted suicide, is a very bad idea and a step backward for Canada and Canadian values, ethics and law. Not least because it will, inevitably, lead to legalizing euthanasia.
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Catholic archbishop of Vancouver calls on government to appeal euthanasia ruling by Tiffany Crawford, Vancouver Sun (6/16/12) – Friday’s decision to strike down the law against euthanasia “sadly reflects a distorted view of equality rights that emphasizes autonomy over human dignity and the value of life,” said Roman Catholic Archbishop J. Michael Miller, in a statement.
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Physician-assisted suicide legal in three states by Christopher Reynolds, Vancouver Sun (6/16/12) – Three states in the U.S. are years ahead of Friday’s B.C. Supreme Court decision to strike down a law criminalizing physician-assisted suicide.
Legislation in Oregon, Washington and Montana allows terminally ill patients to end their lives by requesting prescriptions for lethal medication they administer themselves.
(more)
Judge rejects strongest arguments against physician-assisted suicide by Peter McKnight, Vancouver Sun (6/16/12) – One of the primary, and most persuasive, arguments against permitting physician-assisted suicide is that it could lead to the abuse of vulnerable people, that people who say they want to die may be suffering from depression or otherwise unfit to make such decisions.
So curiously, the most powerful argument against physician-assisted suicide seems, in our world anyway, utterly powerless when it comes to the removal of life-sustaining treatment. This is a point emphasized by proponents of physician-assisted suicide, and referenced by B.C. Supreme Court Justice Lynn Smith in her judgment declaring unconstitutional Canada’s absolute prohibition on the practice.
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Baby boomers won’t stay silent on physician-assisted suicide by Charlie Smith, straight.com (6/16/12) – Given the aging of the population and baby boomers’ desire to retain control over their lives, it’s hard to believe that the legislated ban on physician-assisted suicide will continue well into the future. This is notwithstanding opposition from the Christian Right, some disability-rights’ groups, and many palliative-care physicians.
In 2010, Georgia Straight contributor Daniel Wood wrote a cover story suggesting that this could become the most contentious public issue in the coming decades.
He cited a February 2010 Angus Reid poll showing that 67 percent of Canadians and 75 percent of British Columbians support the creation of a medically regulated system of euthanasia.
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The importance of picking a vocabulary for dying by Andre Picard – The Globe and Mail 6/18/2012 – In matters of life and death, words matter.
That is an important message that emerges from Friday’s B.C. Supreme Court decision that struck down the ban on …Well, on what exactly?
Gloria Taylor, who suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, won the right to end her life at the time of her choosing. Because of the physical limitations caused by ALS, the 64-year-old can get a physician to help by administering a death-hastening drug – the nuance that landed the case in court and on the front pages.
What do you call the right she won?
Physician-assisted suicide? Physician-enabled death? Physician-hastened death? Euthanasia? Voluntary euthanasia? Rational suicide? Suicide? Mercy killing? State-sanctioned murder? Death with dignity? And there are many more variations, each loaded with legal and moral baggage.
(more)

Assisted Dying: Who decides? by Juliet Guichn, The Vancouver Sun 6/21/12 – Who should decide life and death issues – the legislatures or the courts?
This question has returned to the forefront with the British Columbia Supreme Court ruling allowing assisted dying in limited circumstances. Critics of the judicial decision note that members of Parliament two years ago defeated a bill to legalize assisted dying, 228 to 59. Some believe that the courts should not trump the elected Commons.
Yet it would be a mistake to view this matter, and other bioethical matters like it, as a power struggle between two important governmental institutions.
To determine whether assisted dying should be lawful requires the detailed and nuanced contributions of medicine, law and ethics.
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Right-to-Die ruling leaves big questions by Iain Hunter, Times Colonist 6/25/12 – I wish those campaigning for my right to end my life when it becomes unbearable would show a little more restraint than they’ve shown recently.
Dying with Dignity has called the June 15 decision of B.C. Supreme Court Justice Lynn Smith, that the law against physician-aided death is unconstitutional, a “stunning victory.”
I think the right-to-die movement isn’t served by this kind of talk. If this is a war, I don’t know who the enemy is.
I don’t believe that those in our society who think that life, even when sadly depleted, has great value, or our legislators, who have decreed that euthanasia is a crime, set out to tyrannize or brutalize anyone.
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Medical journal urges Canadians to debate assisted suicide by Sharon Kirkey, Postmedia News 6/25/12 – A recent report from an all-party committee of the Quebec national assembly recommending medical assistance to die is moving the debate over euthanasia “from theory toward practice,” says the just-published editorial in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.
“Which way will legislation go? Will the rest of Canada follow? Those who care about the answers to these questions must speak up now, and with conviction.”
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Choosing when and how to die: Are we ready to perform therapeutic homicide? – MedicalExpress.com 6/25/12 – The Dying with Dignity commission of the Quebec National Assembly recently issued its report after two years of public and expert consultation and research.
Advocates of this approach argue that medically assisted death is a patient’s right. It should therefore be considered as an end-of-life care option rather than a criminal act.
(more)

CHINA

Reprieve for helping mom to die – China.org.cn 6/1/2012 – A chinese man who helped his bedridden mother end her life by providing a fatal dose of pesticide walked free from court after he was sentenced to three years in prison with a four-year reprieve for murder.
Panyu District People’s Court in Guangzhou, capital of Guangdong Province, said it was giving Deng Mingjian a lenient sentence because of the way he had cared for his mother before her death.

CZECHOSLAVAKIA

Poll: Czechs support abortion, euthanasia, death penalty – Two-thirds of the citizens believe that Czech legislation should make euthanasia possible…
(more)

DENMARK

Differences of opinion’ over assisted suicide emerging in ethical panel by Jyllands-Posten, the Copenhagen post (6/8/12) – Once unanimous in their opposition, advisory group now divided over making it legal to help people take their own lives.
After coming out decisively against active suicide twice previously in the past 25 years, parliament’s independent panel of ethics experts now appears to be divided on the issue.
(more)

Rare case of assisted suicide (Nyheder 6/8/12) – The court in Odense is about to try an extremely rare case in Denmark, in which a man from Funen is accused of helping his terminally ill father to attempt suicide.
This apparently involved a lethal mixture of 94 morphine pills and yoghurt. The father only died later from his illness, but the son is expected to confess to his failed attempt to help the father take his own life.
(more)

FRANCE

European Court of Human Rights to Rule on Two Euthanasia Cases by Gregor Puppinck (France) – lifenews.com 6/15/12 – Two cases, currently pending, will soon be decided by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR – Koch v. Germany and Alda Gross v. Switzerland). Additionally, the Steering Committee on Bioethics of the Council of Europe (CBDI) is currently writing a guide for the decision making process regarding medical treatment in end of life situations, which will include instructions related to the cessation of acute care and the transition to palliative care and palliative sedation with cessation of hydration and nutrition.
(more)

GERMANY

German Medical association opposes euthanasia by Alex Schadenberg, Executive Director, National Right to Life – 6/12/12 – The German Medical Association recently decided to oppose euthanasia, to forbid euthanasia organizations and to urge the government to make the commercialization of suicide a crime.
This German Medical Association clearly decided at its 115th annual convention to reject euthanasia while opposing the suicide program in Switzerland.
This statement was overshadowed by another important statement–the apology for the crimes that German physicians carried out during World War II, upon the Jewish people, people with disabilities, and others, including the crime of euthanasia.
(more)

INDIA

Govt cautious on euthanasia issue, unlikely to make law – hindustantimes.com (6/12/12) – Treading cautiously on the sensitive issue, the government is unlikely to make a law on euthanasia even a year after the Supreme Court allowed the high courts to take a call on withdrawal of life support for patients living in a permanent vegetative state.   The law ministry had recently made a reference to law commission on the issue seeking its response on certain questions. But sources said the law panel is not too keen to carry out any fresh study on the subject.
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IRELAND

Bill on living wills ‘not about assisted suicide’ by Marie O’Halloran, irishtimes.com (6/9/12) – MINISTER FOR Health James Reilly has insisted that a Private Members’ Bill on living wills is not about assisted suicide or euthanasia.
Dr Reilly said the Advance Healthcare Decisions Bill “is about allowing patients make decisions, when they have the mental capacity to do so, about what they want at the end of their day” in their treatment, “such as whether or not they want to be resuscitated [or] . . . to be administered particular types of medication like chemotherapy”.
He said Ireland needed “a legislative framework in this area” because we were “way behind many other jurisdictions”.
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RUSSIA

Third of Russians Approve of Euthanasia – RIA Novosto, June 6, 2012 – The Russian populace is evenly split on euthanasia, with one-third approving of the practice, one-third thinking it unacceptable and most of the rest are unaware of the concept, according to a new poll published by state-run Public Opinion Foundation.
(more)

SWITZERLAND

Swiss canton to vote on assisted suicide on June 17 by Michael Cook, BioEdge – 6/7/12 – The Swiss canton of Vaud will hold a referendum on June 17 to decide whether nursing homes and hospitals must accept assisted suicide on their premises. (Vaud is a French-speaking canton in the west, whose capital is Lausanne.)
Swiss law on assisted suicide is complex. Euthanasia is illegal, but assisted suicide is legal provided that assistance is not rendered for selfish ends. Nursing homes are not always in favour of allowing Swiss suicide associations to recruit in their premises. So Exit, a group which services only Swiss citizens, launched the current referendum.
(more)

Right-to-Die campaigners converge on Zurich by Clare O’Dea, swissinfo.ch (6/12/12) – More than 100 delegates from right-to-die organisations are expected in Zurich for the Congress of the World Federation of Right-to-Die Societies, which runs from June 13 to 16. A counter conference is due to take place simultaneously.
(more)

Right-to-die movement sees gains as world ages by Emma Thomasson (6/12/12) – Right-to-die activists hope more countries will allow assisted suicide or euthanasia in coming years as the world population ages, but opponents are determined to stop them, a dispute that flared ahead of competing conferences in Switzerland.
(more)

Pro-Lifers to Protest Worldwide Euthanasia Conference in Switzerland by Adam Cassandra, LifeNews.com (6/14/12) – Members of Human Life International (HLI) Switzerland are helping to organize a pro-life conference in Zurich, Switzerland on June 15 in opposition to a meeting of euthanasia activists from around the world.
“Our aim is not to disrupt their conference,” said HLI Switzerland Secretary Christoph Keel. “Our aim is to put other arguments to the visitors of the congress. We are going to organize discussions and we will be there at the entrance (of the conference) to distribute leaflets.”

Swiss canton sanctions assisted suicide – The Local, Switzerland’s news in English (6/18/12) – The canton of Vaud has voted in favour of allowing assisted suicide to take place in nursing homes, making it the first formal Swiss law on the subject.
More than 61 percent of voters in Vaud opted on Sunday in favour of allowing assisted suicide to take place in nursing homes, newspaper Tages Anzeiger reported.
The initiative came about as a local governmental counter-proposal to an earlier initiative launched by Exit, the Swiss organization that assists in suicides.
Exit had wanted to make assisted suicide available in all hospitals as well as to empower patients in all cases to be able to make the final decision on how they wished to die.
That proposal was rejected in favour of the counter-initiative which opens the door for patients who meet certain criteria to be able to take advantage of Exit’s services in nursing homes across the canton.
(more)

UNITED KINGDOM

‘Neutrality’ call on assisted dying (June 15, 2012) – Professional medical bodies should stop opposing assisted dying and take a neutral stance, the British Medical Journal (BMJ) has said.
In an editorial, the journal warns that legislation on helping the terminally ill die is a decision for society, not for doctors.
It mentions a new poll, commissioned by campaign group Dignity In Dying, which found that 62% of doctors want medical bodies to take a neutral stance on the delicate subject.
(more)

What’s wrong with assisted dying? by Peter M. Lapsley (6/4/12) – In her article ‘What’s wrong with assisted dying’, Iona Heath seems over-protective of people’s personal and individual rights to decide the courses of their lives. In particular, I would take issue with her assertion that ‘it is all too easy for sick and disabled people to believe that they are becoming an intolerable burden to those closest to them…’ The implication is that that is not a valid reason to wish to die. I believe that, for some people, it is.
(more)

Retired doctors working together to bring euthanasia to a town near you by Dr. Peter Saunders, CEO of Christian Medical Fellowship (National Right to Life News Today – 6/13/12) – I see that the Secular Medical Forum (SMF) is holding a fringe debate at the British Medical Association (BMA) annual conference featuring Raymond Tallis of ‘Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying’ (HPAD).
HPAD’s members were almost certainly responsible for nine almost identical euthanasia motions put forward to the annual representative meeting of the British Medical Association later this month.
These motions all call for the BMA to adopt ‘a neutral position’ on ‘assisted dying’ and all bear the fingerprints of the pressure group Dignity in Dying (formerly the Voluntary Euthanasia Society) which campaigns for the legalisation of assisted suicide for ‘mentally competent terminally ill adult patients’.
(more)

Doctors should stop opposing assisted suicide – Healthcare Today (UK) 6/14/12 – The British Medical Journal has reignited the debate on assisted dying for terminally ill adults who are mentally competent.
In an editorial, it has called on organisations representing doctors to stop opposing assisted dying, and while it stops short of asking them to back it suggests that the British Medical Association and royal colleges adopt a position of neutrality.
BMJ editor-in-chief Fiona Godlee said: “A change in the law, with all the necessary safeguards, is an almost inevitable consequence of the societal move towards greater individual autonomy and patient choice.
(more)

Assisted dying debate: Tony Nicklinson in his own words – BBC News 6/19/12 – Tony Nicklinson was left paralysed and with locked-in syndrome by a stroke seven years ago.
The 58-year-old wants a doctor to be able to lawfully end his life. A four-day hearing into his case is being heard at the High Court.
Here Mr Nicklinson, from Wiltshire, explains why he wants to change the current law on murder and euthanasia.
(more)

End of suffering of those who are terminally ill by Raymond Tallis, guardian.co.uk 6/24/12 – There is now an unanswerable case for the legalisation of assisted dying for those who are terminally ill…
(more)

BMA rejects assisted suicide move as on delegate likens it to murder by Ella Pickover, The Independent 6/27/12 – Doctors today rejected calls to take a neutral stance on assisted suicide.
Medics at the British Medical Association’s (BMA) annual conference in Bournemouth reiterated their opposition to assisted dying, with one delegate likening it to murder.
Members of the BMA voted down proposals for the organisation to take a neutral stance.
Doctors speaking at the conference cautioned that a change in position would send the wrong message.
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Prolonging suffering of dying patients through medical care is ‘evil,’ BMA conference hears by Rebecca Smith, Medical Editor in Bournemouth 6/27/12 – Prof Raymond Tallis called for the BMA to drop its opposition to a change in the law that would allow doctors to assist terminally ill, mentally competent adult patients to die.
Prof Tallis, of the organisation Healthcare Professionals for Assisted Dying, said: “Unbearable suffering, prolonged by medical care and inflicted on a dying patient who wishes to die is an unequivocal evil.
“What’s more, the right to have your choices supported by others, to determine your own best interest when you are of sound mind, is sovereign.
(more)

YAHOO! VOICES

Euthanasia – a Debate by Smita Sriwastav 5/31/12
An Overview of the Debate Over Euthanasia and the Right to Die: Please kill me… sign here by Jason Cangialosi 11/9/05
Euthanasia is it Murder? by Gage Sandlin 2/19/07
Euthanasia-Should Animals and Humans Be Treated Differently? by Lindsey Russell 10/27/06
Euthanasia: Issues of Society and the Acceptance of Suicide and voluntary Death by Anne Dietz 2/21/07
Euthanasia and the Right to Die by Sam Vaknin 6/27/07 –
An Ethics Case Study on the Right to Die and the Withdrawal of Medical Treatment by Heather Bloor
The (Jewish and Catholic) Bioethics of Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide by RebecaEJ 10/26/07
Study: Doctor-Assisted Suicide Isn’t a Slippery Slope to Abuse: Study found that only AIDS patients used doctor-assisted suicide at elevated rates by Sussy 9/28/07
Assisted Suicide and the Evolution of Law and Technology: A look at lega/medical history through Urofsky’s Lethal judgments by Max Power 11/8/06
The Debate Over Mental Health Professionals as Gatekeepers to Physician Assisted Suicide by Jeremy A. Springer, MSW 9/28/09
Legalizing Physician Assisted Suicide by Christy Edwards 7/10/07
Ethics in Perspective: Politics, Humanism, and Christian Morality by Nicholas Katers 4/10/06

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Mobile Euthanasia Units in the Netherlands

On March 1, 2012, Right-to-Die in the Netherlands rolled out 6 customized vans designed to carry out the death wishes of patients whose doctors refuse to perform requested euthanasia. Under the law, doctors who carry out euthanasia are protected from prosecution. Nevertheless, many Dutch doctors are still afraid of performing euthanasia.

They refer to their religious beliefs, or simply do not know all the details of the new legislation regulating this area. Because of their convictions or lack of legal or medical knowledge, many doctors are not in a position to carry out euthanasia.

There are 6 specialized teams for the mobile units, each with a doctor and one or two nurses, that will criss-cross the country  to carry out euthanasia at the home of patients who meet the criteria and have registered, and whose own doctors refuse to do so.

Patients must be mentally alert when making their request to die, face a future of unbearable, interminable suffering, and both the patient and the doctor, who has to obtain a second opinion before euthanasia is carried  out, must agree there is no cure. Each case is then reported to one of five special commissions, each made up of a doctor, a jurist and an ethical expert charged with verifying that all criteria have been observed.

Proponents say it will help carry out the increasing number of requests for euthanasia and help address the needs of people who may be overlooked by strict regulations. The number of cases in the Netherlands rose 19% in 2010 with a total of 3,136 cases, which represents 2% of all deaths annually. Right-To-Die Netherlands, which receives around 1,000 requests per year for its services, said it has already been contacted by 70 patients interested in the new mobile euthanasia units. The society, which today has 131,000 members and some 150 volunteers in the Netherlands, finances its activities through a yearly membership fee of 17.50 euros.

Critics are calling these mobilized teams “death squads.” Some say: service may result in deaths of patients who could be treated if they continued going to doctors or received some other kind of help. A physician from the Royal Dutch Society of Doctors said “requests for euthanasia must be handled by doctors who have developed a long-term relationship with the patient and have a full understanding of their case.” He says “we are not against euthanasia if there is no other alternative” and has serious doubts that a doctor focused on performing euthanasia would take a holistic view of the patient.

Concerning Mobile Euthanasia Units, in a Feb 25th article, “Assisted Suicide Will Lead to Abuse” in the Vancouver Sun, Cristina Alarcon agrees that legalization in the Netherlands “has led to a ‘kind’ of slippery slope” allowing the healthcare system to do what it wants with patients. She says that the non-compliant patients “are over-dosed with sedatives, starved and dehydrated” and then not reported thus “avoiding risk of prosecution for not following proper ‘euthanasia’ guidelines.” She feels this same thing could happen in Canada and would be “a perfect recipe for abuse.”

Actually, in mobile units in the Netherlands, the procedure can only be performed if the patients have an incurable disease, intolerable pain and no hope of improvement. Patients must also state clearly that they wish to die. Doctors who carry out euthanasia, helping patients pass away in a dignified and painless manner under those rules, are protected from prosecution. Patients may die at home or in the unit’s clinic.
http://www.health24.com/news/Public_health/1-4941,72916.asp

NO PROOF OF ‘SLIPPERY SLOPE’
Yet experts, ordinary citizens, and even some Dutch opponents of the euthanasia law say opponents are exaggerating in their criticism of the Dutch experience with legalized euthanasia.
“We’ve been studying euthanasia and other end-of-life decision-making ever since 1990 … and so far, we have no indication of a slippery slope,” said Dr. Johannes van Delden, a Dutch physician and ethics specialist, who has provided expert testimony at the B.C. Civil Liberties Association’s court challenge to Canada’s prohibition against euthanasia and assisted suicide.

Van Delden, one of six international and Canadian members of the Royal Society of Canada panel that recommended last autumn that Parliament allow a “permissive, yet carefully regulated” assisted death regime, co-authored a 2007 study that cited evidence rebutting a key slippery-slope charge.

“There is no evidence for a higher frequency of euthanasia among the elderly, people with low educational status, the poor, the physically disabled or chronically ill, minors, people with psychiatric illnesses, including depression, or racial or ethnic minorities,” the report asserted.
Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Assisted+suicide+debate+intensifies/6209384/story.html#ixzz1t0GRN8Vv

Nine Myths about Euthanasia in the Netherlands