near death experience

Near-Death versus Nearly Died

I’ve been involved with trying to understand and describe the Near-Death Experience since I had one on 7/18/1971, almost 45  years ago, and have seen it evolve from being called a religious experience to a psychotic break to hallucinations to confirmation that consciousness survives death of the body and proof of life after death. I’ve also seen it turned into something meaningless by people who could have been killed or nearly died or who had a close brush with death, such as this fish who had a series of unfortunate events–

neardeathNearly dying or even being resuscitated after one’s heart stops, is not a “near-death” experience as defined by Dr. Raymond Moody (Life After Life), who coined the term. What makes an event a near-death experience is becoming aware one is outside their physical body, still conscious, still able to see and hear what’s going on around them, with the ability to move through solid walls. Conscious awareness leaves the body and exists independently then returns to the body and remembers an out-of-body experience. Some people may only experience a brief glimpse and then their consciousness quickly returns to their body; some nothing at all; others may travel toward the Light, meet other beings, have multiple experiences in other dimensions, and be given the choice to return to their body. A brief flash or an extended period of time out of body, these are all near-death experiences.

There have been attempts in literature to explain these strange experiences, perhaps from psychedelic drug trips of the authors. I’d say from my own experiments with drugs trying to recreate my own near-death experience that Lewis Carrol probably did mushrooms (I saw all those strange underground people too) and Frank Baum probably did cocaine (I would compare it to LSD visions but it wasn’t around in 1900). It’s the shift from black and white to colors in Oz that make me think so. But not a one of them was comparable to my near-death experience.

1185114_825710760778035_1846995168_nI’ve seen some weird shit too that is very difficult to put into words that accurately describe what I experienced but since I experimented with LSD, cocaine, mushrooms, and MDMA (Ecstasy) 15 years later hoping to recreate my NDE, I have something to compare it to. I remember the details and the emotions I experienced during my NDE, but very little from any drug experiences even though they were more recent. The NDE changed who I am, the drugs did not. I have no fear of death since my NDE. The main thing I found is that every drug trip felt unreal, unnatural, bizarre, strange, not quite right, out of my control in one way or another. During my NDE, everything seemed more real than life on earth, like this was home, this was the true reality and I felt loved unconditionally, that I belonged, that I had done this dying thing before, and it’s all part of our spiritual journey. When I talk with another near-death experiencer, we know exactly what we’re trying to convey. We can finish each others sentences. But to try to tell someone who hasn’t been there is difficult.

I have to use analogies from the physical world. The closest I can come using a visual comparison to “seeing the Light” in the physical world is if you were SCUBA diving in crystal clear ocean waters, down about 50-60 feet… turn over on your back, become very still and look up at the surface of the water. In this crystal clear water, it seems like there is nothing between you and the surface, and you are simply hovering in space. There is no gravity or pressure on your physical body so it seems as if you are simply one with everything. And there is this light shining down from the surface. It is the sun, with rays of light that extend across the top of the water making it sparkle and twinkle like diamonds. Tiny water droplets form orbs that flirt about as if they might be angels. You can look into the light but it doesn’t hurt your eyes. It’s compelling, almost calls you to it; beckons you to join it, become one with it. And when we do, we remember who we really are and what we learned along the way.

And that’s what dying is about. It’s a welcome home after a sojourn on planet Earth. We just can’t re-create that with a drug trip. A drug trip can be a great experience or a terrible experience, it could expand your consciousness or shut down your mind. A near-death experience may cure cancer and heal a broken body or a wounded soul.

We’ll just have to wait until our bodies give out to experience that bliss and, really, drugs are an experience not a lifestyle… in the meantime we’re here to have fun, learn, explore, create, imagine, invent, play, learn to communicate, have relationships, help each other grow and thrive, figure out who we are and why we came here, so Earth remains one of the best places to live an occasional lifetime as a human along our eternal spiritual journey.

• • •

The 8th annual

Smashwords Summer/Winter Sale

July 1 through July 31

This promotion represents a massive collaborative effort where thousands of Smashwords authors and small independent publishers show their appreciation to readers by offering their titles at exclusive deep discounts of 25% off, 50% off, 75% off and FREE. Use code SFREE at checkout.

All of Diane Goble’s ebooks are FREE at Smashwords

Conversations with a Near-Death Experiencer

More Conversations with a Near-Death Experiencer

The above two ebooks are combined in a single Kindle version titled

THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS

How to Die Consciously: Secrets from Beyond the Veil

Available in paperback and Kindle version titled BEYOND THE VEIL: OUR JOURNEY HOME

The Path to Peace & Joy

Reincarnation and the Evolution of Consciousness

Sitting in the Lotus Blossom

 

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Journey of a Mystic – a spiritual awakening

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THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO

COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS

Readers’ questions to a near-death experiencer at BeyondtheVeil.net

 

Chapter Ten

As a bonus, I’ve ended this ebook with two articles that were originally posted on an earlier version of my website, BeyondtheVeil.net, under “Spiritual Lessons.” This one relates to my own spiritual journey of awakening to higher consciousness thinking and living since my Near-Death Experience in 1971.

Journey of a Mystic

 In conclusion…

I feel the more information we have about how the universe works, the easier it is to conceptualize things that are beyond our normal understanding. It gives us a broader frame of reference to help us make sense out of it and fit into our thinking processes so we begin to see it in our Mind’s Eye during our meditations. This is the Time for Science and Spirit to reunite.

Sometimes when you hear a concept explained many different ways, the whole picture suddenly emerges. It’s hard to see the picture when you’re in the frame, you need to step back and take a wider view. This is how our minds synthesize knowledge. We suddenly get an Aha! or the light goes on, and we say, of course, I knew that, I just never heard it explained that way before! We’ve had a sudden Realization, taken a leap in consciousness, and will find it easier to grasp other higher concepts that eluded us previously. It’s about waking up to the truth and no longer being seduced by those who seek to control the masses through fear and intimidation.

So don’t just take my word for it, I’m not asking anyone to believe what I’m writing is anything but the ramblings of a delusional mind. I didn’t ask to have a near-death experience 44 years ago but I did, and what I’m writing is because of it. I see the whole and understand it from a higher perspective. The difficulty is putting it into words that will awaken others. That is my challenge in this life. I’m just putting it out there as I see it through my life and death experiences, and hoping others will think about it, add it to their growing knowledge, and continue seeking Wisdom.

If you want to see how easy it is to change your mind with new information, to shift your perception, check out this popular illusion…

illusion

Is it an old woman or a young woman?

Look again.

Can you shift your perspective at will…

or will you argue for your point of view?

• • •

Read the entire article in

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Cosmic Consciousness

available exclusively on Kindle

Questions about the afterlife and life after death

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THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO

COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS

Readers’ questions to a near-death experiencer at BeyodndtheVeil.net

Chapter Seven

The Afterlife

…your site certainly came into my view at the exact time period in which I could not have needed it more. Thank you for your courage in sharing your story, and for the manner in which you decided to share it. –Patricia

*Strange things taking place

*Dustin’s Wisdom

He told me that “I am in the kingdom of the glorious state of my evolution.” He is very wise.

*He was fine one minute, dead the next

*Wasn’t sure I believed in an afterlife

I was searching through the internet on after life experiences and found your web site and read about your experience. I can’t tell you how emotional it made me. My father just recently passed away and your experience gives me hope that he really is in a better place.

*Talk to him every day

*Why hasn’t my wife contacted me?

My wife and I often discussed these matters and we agreed that whoever died first would make every effort to contact the other somehow. It has now been a month but there has been nothing.

*Afterlife knowledge

*Who will we be with and what will we do there?

*I believe in life after death

In the last week of my Mothers life she was talking to people up on the ceiling. They must have been in two places as she all of a sudden would move her head quickly as if someone spoke from the other side of the room and she was listening to both or all of them.

*Can deceased pets communicate?

• • •

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Cosmic Consciousness

is available exclusively on Kindle

Questions about grief

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THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO

COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS

Readers’ questions to a near-death experiencer at BeyondtheVeil.net

Chapter Four

Grief

…your site certainly came into my view at the exact time period in which I could not have needed it more. Thank you for your courage in sharing your story, and for the manner in which you decided to share it. –Patricia

*Afraid my father was alone when he crossed over

*Grieving for twin

*Can’t get over mother’s death

*Searching for peace of mind

*I don’t feel my son around me

*How do I cope with the sadness?

*Does my husband forgive me for not telling him he was dying?

*Does he know I’m thinking about him?

*It must have been his spirit

*Do animals go to Heaven?

*Will I see my pet in the afterlife?

*Agonizing over daughter’s death

*I’m unable to let go of my spouse

*Loss of a sibling and the mother’s grief

*Your story helped me

*I have this need to know

*Devastated by the loss of my mother

*Is my brother at peace?

*Will my son be there when I get there?

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Cosmic Consciousness

is available exclusively on Kindle

Questions about death and dying

AmazonCover

THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO

COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS

Readers’ questions to a near-death experiencer at BeyondtheVeil.net

Chapter Three

Death and Dying

*Life has no meaning

*Is there a way to communicate with loved ones?

*Presence at the cemetery

*Worried about my dad making it to Heaven

I came across your NDE story. I am searching for answers. I lost my dad and have great difficulty. I worry that my dad might not have made it to heaven. He was a church going man, but as far as learning about salvation, I am not sure whether he learned what he needed to.

*Part of me now believes death is the end

*What was Dad seeing?

*Is it possible to know when we’re going to die?

*My step-son died in Iraq, now my son is going there

*Family Bonds

*Don’t rock the boat

I’m a hospice volunteer. At one of our training sessions on end-of-life issues, we were told by one of the hospice nurses that we should never tell a patient or the family that it’s all right to let go. I was surprised by this advice and can’t say I agree with it. Please let me know your viewpoint.

*Is a visitor watching over my daughter?

*How to approach the dying

*I am struggling to even accept I am dying

*He dreamt that he would die in a car crash

My son told me a few months before his passing that he dreamt that he would die in a car crash but I tried to convince him that he was wrong, but he told me that he seen other things that had come true and even said that I wouldn’t believe some of the things he had seen, he wouldn’t describe them to me.

*Angelic choir

*Grandma was telling me no from the other side

*Transition Guide training

*I am not much use

*My dog is dying

My only companion and friend is dying, my dog Betsy. I have made several promises to her, and I think we understand each other. I promised no drugs and euthanasia, unless she were suffering, which she does not seem to be. I promised I would be with her throughout it all–I am with her. Should it really be her time, do you have any suggestions for me to assist her further? 

*How do I approach hospice to offer my services?

*Interested in helping myself and others make a graceful transition

*What was my Gram aware of in her final moments?

*Speechless

I just visited your site. And I am speechless. I have been reading through your articles beginning with the right to die. I am caring for an elderly grandmother who I refused to let stay in a nursing home. Just recently we started a journal of sorts to organize her memories and life. I continued reading on through meaning of life etc and the hair on my arms and the crown of my head stood up. I was moved to tears. Some how I wanted to cry with joy for what I was reading. I was so deeply touched by your insights some how you’ve articulated so many things I’ve felt, thought and sensed.

*Concerned about final decisions

*Letting go to the Light #1

*Letting go to the Light #2

*My father is dying

*Conversations about end of life issues

*Should your doctor help you die?

Survey of Parade Magazine readers, September 1997– “As we increasingly recognize the limitations of medicine, most of us believe we should be allowed to take things into our own hands, our survey indicates. Two-thirds of the respondents (66%) feel doctors should be allowed to help terminally ill patients die with dignity.”

• • •

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Cosmic Consciousness

is available exclusively on Kindle

Questions about fear of death

AmazonCover

THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO

COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS

Readers’ questions to a near-death experiencer at BeyondtheVeil.net

Chapter Two

Fear of Death 

*Afraid I will never see him again

*What’s wrong with me?

I have feared death since I was 10 unlike other stories I hear about how people go through a traumatic situation and they come out scarred it just happened to me one night while my grandparents were babysitting. Maybe I remember the specific time because I’m still younger I don’t know but that night still burns in the back of my mind I wish it never happened. Ever since that day especially in spring (no clue there either) I am haunted with the idea that someday I am not here.

*There must be a bigger picture

*I try to scream away the fear

*Constant petrifying, paralyzing fear

Over the last six months I have been feeling increasingly panicky and have had several severe attacks that have been utterly petrifying but more disturbingly to me for the first time I have been consciously panicking about the fact that ONE DAY I AM GOING TO DIE AND THERE IS NOTHING I CAN DO ABOUT IT…..

*I dwell on the fear of dying

*This scares the hell out of me

*I don’t want to live with this fear

*Obsessed with the impermanence of life

*Overwhelmed with thoughts of dying

*Fear of death overwhelms me

*I’m tormented by fear of death

I just read about your NDE experience, I have read many cases on the subject and many books. The whole subject gives me great hope as I have been tormented by the fear of death for nearly all my life.

*Fear of death holds me back

*Why am I scared of dying?

*Dreams of death

*Panic attacks over fear of dying

*I have an extreme fear of death

Please help me learn how to overcome fear of death. I’m afraid to go anywhere or do anything. I’m a prisoner in my own house. I can’t go on this way. I’m 32 years old.

*How can I overcome my fear of death?

• • •

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Cosmic Consciousness

is available exclusively on Kindle

Pauline Interviews Near-Death Experiencer Diane Goble

Diane Goble, MS, CCHt

Author, Educator, Spiritual Counselor, Hypnotherapist, Transition Guide

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talks about her near-death experience while drowning and the after-effects

with Pauline (March 2015) in Sisters, Oregon

Part One (14:32)

Part Two (10.03)

Part Three (11:32)

For more information, go to BeyondtheVeil.net

9780963860651-Perfect.indd

Available at amazon.com and bookstores everywhere

Death with Dignity laws

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The recent death of a 29-year old woman who chose to use the Death with Dignity law in Oregon has invigorated the debate about our right to make choices about our healthcare at the end of our life. Brittany Maynard had a brain tumor that doctors said would end her life in a most undignified manner and she chose not to experience that part of her illness. She completed her Bucket List and enjoyed the last quality time she could with her husband and parents, and died peacefully at the time of her choosing at home in her own bed surrounded by those who loved her.

If you are facing such a decision, whether you are thinking about the Death with Dignity option or not, this book by a Near-Death Experiencer, will help you find acceptance and peace of mind as you navigate medical decisions, care options including palliative and hospice services, conversations with family and providers, filling out Advance Healthcare Directives and making decisions about how your want to die.

Beyond the Veil is for caregivers who will be transition guides for their loved ones, for families to help them have the necessary conversations, and for the dying person who wants desperately to know what is happening to them along their journey home.

Excerpt from Beyond the Veil: our journey home by Diane Goble about Death with Dignity laws:

Reasonable laws can prevent abuse while honoring self-respect, human dignity and compassion. Just as an obstetrician might administer a drug to hasten a birth, a doctor may prescribe a drug that will hasten not death but the rebirth of our spiritual nature. Prepared ahead of time and guided by a transition guide’s voice reading one’s Personal Transition Guidebook, it is a peaceful journey home beyond the veil.

Some people believe it is a slippery slope to allow this at all. They are afraid mentally or physically disabled or senile elderly people will be murdered for convenience. Perhaps in some societies where human life isn’t valued that could be true. It is up to those who believe in death with dignity to make sure laws are in place to prevent forced euthanasia by designating medical professionals and safe procedures to provide humane, compassionate assistance to those who decide of their own free will to exercise this option.

A May 2005 Galllup Poll indicated that 75% of Americans support “euthanasia” for certain patients but only 58% support “doctor-assisted suicide” for the same patients. Use of the term “suicide” was the only difference in the question asked. The Gallup Poll conclusion was that the use of the word caused the apparent conflict in values.

Opponents count on the negative emotional impact of the term. Calling it “suicide” or “murder” conjures up images that clash with religious beliefs and humanitarian values, but have nothing to do with personal choice at the end of life.

This is what Dr. Jack Kervorkian fought for–a patient’s right to choose and the physician’s role at end of life. It’s nobody’s business except the person who is dying, his physician and his family members (and sometimes not the latter). It’s continuing care through the end of life.

Instead of physicians abandoning their patients at the end of their invasive medical treatment options, they could stay with them to provide the medication that will quickly end their suffering if that is their patient’s final request.

Their Hippocratic oath says, firstly, do no harm, but if forcing a person to stay alive while their body  progressively deteriorates for years, whether physically or mentally, isn’t doing harm, I don’t know what is. Seems to me physicians need a better understanding of compassion. Continuing to swear an oath to Greek gods is out of touch with contemporary reality–the earth is not flat and doctors are not gods.

A Peaceful Death with Dignity

I’d like to express my appreciation to Brittany Maynard for going public with her decision to exercise her Death with Dignity option in Oregon because it will bring this conversation to the family dinner table where it belongs. Of course I’m sad she has this terrible condition, but if she can make something positive out of a bad situation, which she is by raising awareness, it gives hope to many people who want the same thing– if my death is inevitable, let it be peaceful and on my own terms.

This is what I encourage people to do on a daily basis through my writings and “Having The Conversation over Coffee and Cake” gatherings. I don’t encourage Death with Dignity, but I’m not afraid to address it as an option and provide resources, such as Compassion & Choices, if people want to consider it. This is a truly personal decision that should be between a terminally ill patient and those in his or her inner circle and it’s a shame the Maynard family has to be exposed to the vitriol that permeates Internet over their personal decision to allow Brittany to have a peaceful death with dignity. It’s as if  everybody suddenly noticed there’s an elephant in the room.

Those among us who think we have a right to an opinion about how any person decides he or she wants his/her death to be should be thinking about how they want the end of their lives to be, not someone they don’t even know. If, for whatever reason you think, having control over one’s own death at the end of life, is wrong then do it your way, whatever that is – and let me do it my way. Don’t force your views on me because you think you have all the right answers and I won’t interfere with your decisions about how you choose to experience your last days. And I’m referring here to people who have been given 6 months or less to survive a terminal illness, are in intractable pain or unbearable agony or suffering, and choose not to prolong their life.

That choice is still limited by the ability to self-administer the medication and therein lies the crux of the problem. If the person waits too long and loses decision-making abilities, or there is a sudden change in health that precludes swallowing or self-administering the medication, or if the person makes the request too late for all the paperwork to be completed, there are complications. This is where the law comes in. We can’t have people recklessly giving vulnerable people life-ending medications, or physicians or insurance companies or the government deciding when life no longer has value.

The law that was passed in Oregon takes into account the legal aspects of the issue to the extent that we can protect the vulnerable and protect physicians, hospice workers, pharmacists and families, from prosecution for helping a dying person carry out their wishes for a peaceful ending to their physical existence. This law has stood the test of time with no slippery slope or mass extinction for 17 years and is the basis for the laws passed in Washington, Vermont, and pending a vote in several other states.

Studies among physicians reveal a majority of physicians would refuse treatment and consider Death with Dignity for themselves, but they would suggest continuing treatments to their patients. They have the hypocrisy to claim that an oath written 2500 years ago by people who believed the earth was flat, and gods and goddesses ruled over humanity, told them to do no harm and give no poison. What really is the harm if the person is dying and is in considerable pain?

Which leads us to consider religious views that claim God said this or that, or a Jesus or a Mohammed said this or that, and believe that their holy book or their dogma is the one and only truth – and that it applies to the rest of us. And many people don’t believe… that there is even a God or a Jesus or a Mohammed to have a say so in the matter. Then we have many ethical atheists who think we only have one life and have no right to end it on our own terms.

We live in a world where millions of people die every day, often sick, hungry, dehydrated, neglected or savagely beaten, enslaved, decapitated, electrocuted, eviscerated, drowned, bombed, burned alive, as if they were meaningless cockroaches. But suddenly we become concerned and know what’s best for some poor person who has been suffering terribly with some dreadful disease or condition, and only asks for a peaceful death with dignity in the privacy of their own bedrooms, surrounded by their loved ones.

I hope Brittany Maynard’s plight will be an awakening to all you who have doubts about what is the right thing to for you in a situation like she is facing and begin to see that death is a sacred journey into whatever comes next. We will all go through it, we need to recognize that it is a graduation, not the end of our journey.

The message from my near-death experience is that We Don’t Die! Death of the body is not the end of life – life goes on and there is so much more to look forward to beyond the veil of illusion.

Peace & Joy!

Diane

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