near death experience

Near-Death versus Nearly Died

I’ve been involved with trying to understand and describe the Near-Death Experience since I had one on 7/18/1971, almost 45  years ago, and have seen it evolve from being called a religious experience to a psychotic break to hallucinations to confirmation that consciousness survives death of the body and proof of life after death. I’ve also seen it turned into something meaningless by people who could have been killed or nearly died or who had a close brush with death, such as this fish who had a series of unfortunate events–

neardeathNearly dying or even being resuscitated after one’s heart stops, is not a “near-death” experience as defined by Dr. Raymond Moody (Life After Life), who coined the term. What makes an event a near-death experience is becoming aware one is outside their physical body, still conscious, still able to see and hear what’s going on around them, with the ability to move through solid walls. Conscious awareness leaves the body and exists independently then returns to the body and remembers an out-of-body experience. Some people may only experience a brief glimpse and then their consciousness quickly returns to their body; some nothing at all; others may travel toward the Light, meet other beings, have multiple experiences in other dimensions, and be given the choice to return to their body. A brief flash or an extended period of time out of body, these are all near-death experiences.

There have been attempts in literature to explain these strange experiences, perhaps from psychedelic drug trips of the authors. I’d say from my own experiments with drugs trying to recreate my own near-death experience that Lewis Carrol probably did mushrooms (I saw all those strange underground people too) and Frank Baum probably did cocaine (I would compare it to LSD visions but it wasn’t around in 1900). It’s the shift from black and white to colors in Oz that make me think so. But not a one of them was comparable to my near-death experience.

1185114_825710760778035_1846995168_nI’ve seen some weird shit too that is very difficult to put into words that accurately describe what I experienced but since I experimented with LSD, cocaine, mushrooms, and MDMA (Ecstasy) 15 years later hoping to recreate my NDE, I have something to compare it to. I remember the details and the emotions I experienced during my NDE, but very little from any drug experiences even though they were more recent. The NDE changed who I am, the drugs did not. I have no fear of death since my NDE. The main thing I found is that every drug trip felt unreal, unnatural, bizarre, strange, not quite right, out of my control in one way or another. During my NDE, everything seemed more real than life on earth, like this was home, this was the true reality and I felt loved unconditionally, that I belonged, that I had done this dying thing before, and it’s all part of our spiritual journey. When I talk with another near-death experiencer, we know exactly what we’re trying to convey. We can finish each others sentences. But to try to tell someone who hasn’t been there is difficult.

I have to use analogies from the physical world. The closest I can come using a visual comparison to “seeing the Light” in the physical world is if you were SCUBA diving in crystal clear ocean waters, down about 50-60 feet… turn over on your back, become very still and look up at the surface of the water. In this crystal clear water, it seems like there is nothing between you and the surface, and you are simply hovering in space. There is no gravity or pressure on your physical body so it seems as if you are simply one with everything. And there is this light shining down from the surface. It is the sun, with rays of light that extend across the top of the water making it sparkle and twinkle like diamonds. Tiny water droplets form orbs that flirt about as if they might be angels. You can look into the light but it doesn’t hurt your eyes. It’s compelling, almost calls you to it; beckons you to join it, become one with it. And when we do, we remember who we really are and what we learned along the way.

And that’s what dying is about. It’s a welcome home after a sojourn on planet Earth. We just can’t re-create that with a drug trip. A drug trip can be a great experience or a terrible experience, it could expand your consciousness or shut down your mind. A near-death experience may cure cancer and heal a broken body or a wounded soul.

We’ll just have to wait until our bodies give out to experience that bliss and, really, drugs are an experience not a lifestyle… in the meantime we’re here to have fun, learn, explore, create, imagine, invent, play, learn to communicate, have relationships, help each other grow and thrive, figure out who we are and why we came here, so Earth remains one of the best places to live an occasional lifetime as a human along our eternal spiritual journey.

• • •

The 8th annual

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July 1 through July 31

This promotion represents a massive collaborative effort where thousands of Smashwords authors and small independent publishers show their appreciation to readers by offering their titles at exclusive deep discounts of 25% off, 50% off, 75% off and FREE. Use code SFREE at checkout.

All of Diane Goble’s ebooks are FREE at Smashwords

Conversations with a Near-Death Experiencer

More Conversations with a Near-Death Experiencer

The above two ebooks are combined in a single Kindle version titled

THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS

How to Die Consciously: Secrets from Beyond the Veil

Available in paperback and Kindle version titled BEYOND THE VEIL: OUR JOURNEY HOME

The Path to Peace & Joy

Reincarnation and the Evolution of Consciousness

Sitting in the Lotus Blossom

 

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Questions about near-death experiences & near-death experiencers

AmazonCover

THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO

COSMIC CONSCIOUSNESS

Readers’ questions to a near-death experiencer at BeyondtheVeil.net

Chapter One

Near-Death Experiences

*Nothing on earth had prepared me for the reality of life after death

Your Q&A approach covers every question that I had before I had thought of them yet. “Nothing on Earth Had Prepared Me For the Reality of Life After Death” was the most profound, insightful piece of writing I have yet found in all of the NDE books I have read. I know how impossible it is to put NDE subjects in relatable or fresh terms, but I think you succeeded. –RJ

*I wish I could have a near death experience

*What accounts for the differences in NDE stories?

*Difference between afterlife and near death experiences?

*PTSD from NDE’s

*Struggles after a NDE

*Difficult time getting over NDE

*Confused about NDE

*Difficult to embrace who I’ve become

*NDEr has revelation

*There are others out there

*NDE changed my life

*Reaction to anesthesia?

*NDE by drug overdose

*Childhood NDE

*I remember it like it was yesterday

*Why do some people not remember their NDE?

*What makes you decide to stay or come back?

*Has anyone ever experienced hell and came back?

*Did you come back from your NDE with a vision of the future?

*Medical professional skeptical but curious

*Organ recipient has NDE-like aftereffects

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to Cosmic Consciousness

is available exclusively on Kindle

Interview with Brabara Graver on Blog Talk Radio (9/27/12) about my Near-Death Experience

Listen tointernet radio with Barbara Graver on Blog Talk Radio